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I have a question about my post: MSSQL drop and recreate all dependencies (keys, constraints, views) for altering columns

I tried to ask this question three times.

  • The first time: it was flagged for asking for libraries - my mistake, so I removed the specific part that was asking for libraries and posted it again the next day.

  • The second time: I immediately got flagged for asking the same question. Sure, I asked the same question but to my knowledge, I just corrected my mistakes and it should be good? The question was open for like 2 minutes only, then it got closed again for being too unspecific.

  • The third time: I edited my closed question and changed the whole phrasing to make it more specific and to avoid being flagged again for it being too unspecific.

Why wasn't it flagged for "needs more focus" the first time?

Why did I have to post it 2 times just to find that out?

And is there any chance the question will be opened up again?

I changed the whole text and there is no notification or similar of anybody looking over it again. Will I have to submit it again tomorrow or is editing a closed question the same as reposting it?

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    If anybody wants to read the original question, i can provide that if needed.
    – marcus
    Feb 9 at 10:28
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    "posted it againt it the next day" I think this is your problem. You should edit the existing question instead of posting it again. If you repost it, it might lead to a question ban for your account
    – Dharman Mod
    Feb 9 at 10:36
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    Thanks for your feedback. I am new to this site, I don't see any information on a question being reopened when the edit is alright. Or any other kind of feedback to the edit. So you say it makes sense to wait, now that i edited the question, and that there will be some kind of response, telling me that the edit was good or bad?
    – marcus
    Feb 9 at 10:38
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    When you edit, there is a checkbox that will send this question for a review by other users. Use that box when you think your question is ready. However, I don't think your question is ready.
    – Dharman Mod
    Feb 9 at 10:39
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    You have come to the right place asking for help with your question. Meta is where you can find more people and they can guide you how to improve the question. Wait until some people share their opinions and ideas on how to improve it, then edit the question and mark it as ready for review.
    – Dharman Mod
    Feb 9 at 10:42
  • Thanks, found the checkbox, didn't see that before. What do think is not ready? I specified what my goal is, what I have tried, what did not work and what my Question is. I don't see any missing information for experienced users to answer it?
    – marcus
    Feb 9 at 10:42
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    You might also want to check help section on dba.stackexchange.com to see if your question would be more on-topic there. It sounds like it has less to do with programming and more to do with database administration. If your question really is about programming then it would help to understand what is the programming context of it.
    – Dharman Mod
    Feb 9 at 10:44
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    "How come it wasn't flagged for "needs more focus" the first time?" - well you can only flag for one thing at a time and library (or off-site resource) recommendations are pretty much the top trigger. So much so that you shouldn't even hint at it in the text to avoid false positives.
    – Gimby
    Feb 9 at 13:30
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    Handy reading on question crafting: codeblog.jonskeet.uk/2010/08/29/writing-the-perfect-question Feb 9 at 17:38
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    I think Needs more focus is kind-of apt, since the task has very many subtasks. Dropping a key is unrelated to dropping a view is unrelated to dropping a constraint. This will very likely involve separate code, I recommend asking one at a time, doing your research, and trying to share an attempt. Preferably you'd even separate it into list all views that depend on a column, and drop them, but dropping something you can list is trivial.
    – Erik A
    Feb 9 at 19:45
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    Questions are closed far too quickly. If problems were addressed with comments instead of knee-jerk close votes, your original question might have been redeemable. Feb 11 at 15:50
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    The question might have been better received on Database Administrators.SE. Feb 11 at 17:36
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    @KevinKrumwiede While I agree that early comments should address discrepancies, why shouldn't questions with problems be closed quickly? It prevents noisy answers that may or may not address the specific issue the question should be about. The question can be edited and improved to the point of actually being answerable and placed in the review queue to be reopened. If anything, it takes far too long to get questions reopened once they have been improved.
    – Drew Reese
    Feb 11 at 19:34
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    @Trilarion OP is asking a series of questions, of which the last one is not even the crux of their concern; I've rolled back the title because the change made it less accurate.
    – TylerH
    Feb 11 at 20:20
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    @Trilarion I agree questions should have a specific title where possible, and I agree with you that the current title has plenty of room for improvement. However, focusing it on the least of the multiple questions OP asked in their body was a clear regression from its original state.
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

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Why wasn't it flagged for "needs more focus" the first time?

That's a problem if a post has multiple issues. People generally pick one and then the most popular is what is displayed.

Why did I have to post it 2 times just to find that out?

We do have a help centre with this information in. You can find it by clicking on the question mark icon at the top right of the page. We do have a problem that people want to ask questions without feeling they need to figure out how this site works and what questions are and aren't allowed, so you're by no means the first person to post away and assume everything will be OK.

And is there any chance the question will be opened up again?

Edited closed questions go into a review queue for reopening. If 3 experienced users agree it's now OK it will be reopened. Additionally editing a question moves it back to the top of the active questions list so people interested in the question's tags will see it and may also vote for reopening it.

At the time of writing this answer your question has 2 of the required 3 votes to reopen so the likelihood it will be reopened would appear quite high.

I should warn you though that deleting and reasking the same question may result in a question ban as all those deleted questions count against you for the purpose of the ban. It's much better to edit a question into shape than to delete it and ask it again.

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    Closed questions are almost never reopened. When they are, it takes several days at least. Feb 11 at 15:52
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    @KevinKrumwiede motivation to polish your question and make it perfect first time. You're asking people to give up their free time to help you after all. Feb 11 at 16:09
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    @RobertLongson, as a long time user of SO/SE, I know just how nearly impossible it is to make a question, or even answer, "perfect the first time". I've had people complain that I did too much research on a question at the same time as saying I hadn't done enough, as well as the "not enough" people posting links in comments for me to "check out" that were included in my question. The "rules" around this site are so subjective that people disagree on every one of them almost constantly. Your answer apparently isn't perfect, since it has downvotes. Feb 11 at 16:18
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    @KevinKrumwiede Stack Overflow provides no guarantee for timely answers. Many questions go unanswered for years before receiving an answer. So the concern about improving questions or reopening them taking too much time is unwarranted. If someone has an urgent need for assistance they should seek paid, professional help.
    – TylerH
    Feb 11 at 17:40
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    @TylerH But it is almost guaranteed to never be reopened. Time is a issue, but not the main issue that Kevin is raising.
    – TheMaster
    Feb 11 at 23:36
  • @KevinKrumwiede Well, the Moderation Tools page (sorry, but I think you need 10k rep to see it) shows that 17 questions have been reopened today ... and that figure is not unusual. Feb 13 at 22:59
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    @TheMaster YMMV there. While it's true that more questions get closed than re-opened, that's sort of the intent/design of such a system (you can only reopen a question that's... already been closed). I should note far more questions never get closed compared to the number that do get closed. Also, the mechanism for reopening is equally weighted to the mechanism for closing: three votes each (or 1 in dupehammer cases).
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 17:19
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    @TheMaster In fact, reopening is induced more easily than closing: an edit to a closed question can automatically start the reopen review process. There is no such automatic option for starting the close review process. All things considered, "almost guaranteed to never be reopened" is demonstrably false/inaccurate.
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 17:20
  • @TylerH Have to disagree with you there. First a comparison isn't even needed. Need to be closed questions, which do not get closed is just as much a problem as closing questions which never should've been closed or closed questions, which should've been reopened.They're all related.I don't choose to close questions as much because I don't trust that it'll be reopened, if edited properly.So, I usually wait for OP to edit or comment back.If there indeed was a robust high quality review queue, I would close in 0s. And No, I completely disagree that my inference is demonstrably false/inaccurate.
    – TheMaster
    Feb 14 at 20:04
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    @TheMaster You can disagree if you like, but that doesn't make it untrue; thousands of questions get reopened every year.
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 20:48
  • @TylerH That number means nothing. On average, around 2% of questions that are edited are reopened, while 16% of total questions are closed. Just because you say it's "demonstrably false" doesn't make it true. I think many agree with my statement: Questions that are closed tend to stay closed (+113/-27) than disagree. I think your statement would actually be demonstrably false.
    – TheMaster
    Feb 15 at 6:21
  • @TheMaster Actually, yes it does. That's what 'demonstrably false' means. You made a claim that questions never get reopened. I provided evidence to the contrary, demonstrating that your claim was false. What you're doing now is called 'moving the goalposts' by saying things like "well actually I didn't mean that; I really meant this instead, which is similar but slightly different enough to make me right and you wrong, ha ha checkmate!"
    – TylerH
    Feb 15 at 15:08
  • @TylerH That claim was never made. Did you miss the "almost" in my original claim? It means "nearly, but not exactly". 97+% is almost. 2+% is negligible. The goal post is exactly where it was.
    – TheMaster
    Feb 15 at 15:26
  • @TheMaster "almost" is insufficient to change the meaning, given the huge number of reopened questions that exist as a counterpoint. The bottom line is questions get reopened all the time. Yes, it's harder than closing questions, for inherent and obvious reasons, and yes, that's OK. Would some percentage value higher than the current value be better? Perhaps, but that's outside the scope of your rather narrow, rather easily disproved claim.
    – TylerH
    Feb 15 at 16:04
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so I removed the specific part that was asking for libraries and posted it again the next day.
The second time: I immediately got flagged for asking the same question.

You need to edit the original question, not post a second one. People sometimes do that to dodge the reasons why a question got closed, so it is frowned upon. Plus it also creates a bunch of duplicates about the same thing.

Why wasn't it flagged for "needs more focus" the first time?

When closing a post we can only pick one reason, even if there are multiple problems with a question. Sometimes different close voters pick different reasons, which one that gets displayed when the question gets closed is as per majority vote - so if two people voted "duplicate" and one voted "too broad", it will get closed with the reason of being a duplicate. But the close vote of the person who voted "too broad" still counts.

Why did I have to post it 2 times just to find that out?

One can start by reading https://stackoverflow.com/help, the "Asking" part in particular, before asking the first question. A few of these things are also covered by the new user tour: https://stackoverflow.com/tour

And is there any chance the question will be opened up again?

It currently has two reopen votes by reviewers, it needs 3, so it seems likely. There is also a delete vote for some reason. I know too little of the topic to tell if the close, reopen or delete votes are justified or not.

I changed the whole text and there is no notification or similar of anybody looking over it again. Will I have to submit it again tomorrow or is editing a closed question the same as reposting it?

Whenever you edit a closed post, it ends up in a review queue for "reopen reviews", which means that a number of veteran users will take a look at it and vote to reopen or leave closed, if they think that the edit solved all problems with the question or not.

Therefore, editing a closed question is the preferred way, since that's how you can get it reviewed and re-opened. Questions are closed rather than deleted for one reason: to give the question a chance to get edited into shape and re-opened.

You should absolutely not post a new question with the same contents, as that will be regarded as trying to dodge the reasons that your question got closed to begin with.

Please note that posting multiple poorly-received questions, to the point where a majority of your questions were poorly-received, will count towards a question ban from using the site, regardless if you delete them or not! Deleted questions are still stored, just not visible, and will count towards such a ban. This is an automatic process by site mechanics that can't be reversed by moderators.

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    Not viable because closed questions are almost never reopened. Feb 11 at 15:51
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    @KevinKrumwiede there are 698 questions in the reopen queue at the moment, they will be reviewed and if sufficient information has been provided and issues have been addressed they will be reopened.
    – user692942
    Feb 11 at 17:10
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    From my personal observation—which is of course anecdotal—most closed questions are closed for good reason, most are not subsequently edited (at least not meaningfully), and even most that are edited are still not good questions. So I don't think "Closed questions are almost never reopened" necessarily implies any fault or undue difficulty in the reopening process, or any disparity between questions which are and which should be reopened. Feb 11 at 19:38
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    The above comment is correct, but the reopening process does need work. Unfortunately it's loosely defined work that does not have the same fit for all cases, making the work very hard to implement. Feb 11 at 19:58
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    Edits no longer automatically nominate a question for reopening. Now there's a checkbox to submit it for reopen review or not, so it's possible to fix a minor problem, or one of multiple major problems in response to comments, without using up your chance to have it reopened when it's actually ready. Feb 11 at 20:54
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This is an obvious UX issue, the close dialog should tell you in no ambigous terms that you should edit your question to get it reopened. We've improved the feedback loop from the reopen queue, but that doesn't help if the user isn't editing their previous question to trigger the loop. I would like that this issue is addressed on all close reason, where it follows the format of: short reason why it was closed, what to do to fix it, and last the full details about the close reason.

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    Yes, that is basic UX design. It is not that complicated. Feb 11 at 17:44
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I'd say this question boils down to the age-old maxim, There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch.

marcus, I do sympathize with your frustration. We do tend to have a hairtrigger response to questions that don't meet our guidelines or follow our rules. We do tend to downvote and close questions somewhat capriciously — because it depends in large part on who comes along and notices first, and everyone has their own, different standards. Despite major and somewhat successful efforts to change things over the past few years, we can still seem very unwelcoming to newcomers.

The thing is — and I apologize if this sounds like a cheesy rationalization, although I guess that's what it really is — at the end of the day you're not guaranteed to get an answer here, and any answer you do get isn't free. You don't have to pay for it in dollars or XP or anything, but you do sometimes have to pay for it in frustration. Sometimes you don't get an answer at all. Sometimes you don't get the answer you want. Sometimes you have to grovel, or comply with seemingly petulant demands for extra information. Sometimes your question gets closed so fast you don't have time to fix it, leaving you in a hard-to-get-out-of limbo, like what happened to you here.

And the worst part is, you can't even complain. There's no customer service desk you can go to. And if you dare to object to the way you've been treated, there's another hairtrigger response of ours that kicks in, namely to berate you for complaining, to remind you that the answerers are all unpaid volunteers, to point out that you're not guaranteed an answer at all — as in fact I did, myself, right here in this answer.

So, again, I'm sorry, but I realize that me being sorry doesn't help you get a better answer, doesn't change the way you have or will be treated. It is what it is, I guess.

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    And the reason we have such stringent standards is that there's a fire-hose stream of low-quality low-effort questions asking the same boring things over and over again, or where it's not even clear what they're asking. If a question smells like that at all, most of us would rather not spend our time on it. There's still a sufficient volume of good & interesting new questions, plus the existing library of past questions, to keep most people occupied. Plus it's a matter of expecting people to show respect for our time by putting effort into making their questions clear and on-topic. Feb 11 at 21:01
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    @PeterCordes And the reason that firehose has increased of late, I believe, is that one of our all-too-effective remedies against the low-quality questions used to be that we tended to be quite rude to their askers. Now that we are (relatively) more welcoming, we're getting more cruft. But, we still tend to be rude to people who, no matter how unwittingly, fail to "follow the rules", and that's lamentable. We don't expect an OP to know, say, every nuance of C before asking a question. So why do we expect them to know every nuance of asking questions on Stack Overflow? Feb 11 at 21:09
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    The other part of the problem (or, if not a "problem" per se, then at least, the other reason for questions like this) is that we maintain the quaint fiction that, because we assert that downvoting and closing questions is not intended to be hurtful to posters, that posters should not therefore feel hurt when we do it to them. Feb 11 at 21:10
  • Thanks for your response, the part with the "pay for it in frustration" really made me laugh. I learned a lot from my first question here and i will for sure improve in the future to make it easier for the people reviewing my question : )
    – marcus
    Mar 1 at 11:31

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