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Coming from this Cleaning up PowerShell tags discussion, I am trying to figure out the use of version tags as e.g. . Using the What are tags, and how should I use them? document (which unfortunately doesn't include anything specific about version tags) as reference:

A tag is a word or phrase that describes the topic of the question. Tags are a means of connecting experts with questions they will be able to answer by sorting questions into specific, well-defined categories.

Since I started being active in answering PowerShell questions at Stack Overflow more than five years ago, I never used version tags to filter PowerShell questions. Besides, it is hard to imagine that version tags will supply a category to a specific expertise (at least for PowerShell), meaning that an expert would only be interested in answering to a specific PowerShell version.

Tags can also be used to help you identify questions that are interesting or relevant to you.

As a user, searching for (an answer to) a question, I feel that version tags might actually reduce the value of the search in two possible ways:

  1. Entering the version tag in the search might not reveal my actual issue.
    Just looking to the title (not even to the content of the question / tag), it appears that there are quite a few questions specific to a PowerShell version that are not tagged accordingly. As an example:
  • This means that rather than adding value to my query by adding a version tag, I might devalue it as there is a reasonable change that I actually exclude a possible answer to my question.
  1. Questions only marked with a version tag are excluded from a general search.
    If a user is not aware that his question is version related, he might not be able to find the solution as not all version related issues are marked with a general tag (as e.g. ). This appears from the following queries:
  • In other words, a user might not be able to find the solution to his question if it is only tagged with a specific version. Does this mean that it is recommended to include all the possible version tags in a search?
  • This is related to the Wouldn't tag inheritance make sense? discussions.

From my (PowerShell related questions) view, tags like:

(or [*-dependent], or [*-specific]) would add more value to the tag list or related search...

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  • 11
    You can search generic tags and version tags with [prefix*] (e.g. [powershell*]) Feb 2 at 13:59
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    Version tags should be used in addition to the non-versioned, in my opinion. This means that people searching for a problem in a particular product ([powershell] in your case) can still find them, but then if the question is tagged [powershell-7] as well, and the user is using Powershell 5, they know that the solution(s) may well not work on their environment, or they might choose to ignore the qusetion entirely. They will also be very useful if/when version tags for answers arrive.
    – Larnu
    Feb 2 at 14:04
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    @Mark Rotteveel, good point for a search query. But how does this apply to the actual tagging? Take in example the question PowerShell inline If (IIf), the question only applies to versions prior to version 7. Should I tag it witch all prior versions: powershell-1.0 powershell-2.0 powershell-3.0 powershell-4.0 powershell-5.0 powershell-5.1 powershell-6.0 (which isn't even allowed...)?
    – iRon
    Feb 2 at 14:50
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    @iRon don’t retag old questions which weren’t version specific by the time they were asked. The questioner didn’t intent to restrict the question to versions prior to 7, it just happens that the issue does not apply to version 7 anymore, which would be a valid answer to the question. Tagging with an old version should only be done when the questioner wants to restrict the question intentionally, e.g. “I can’t use version 7”, but then, the highest version they can use should be added as tag. This doesn’t preclude solutions which would work on even older versions.
    – Holger
    Feb 3 at 10:06
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    @Holger, thanks for your comment (btw, I am the questioner of this specific question). Funny, what you are saying sounds like almost the opposite of what I thought the intention of a version tag is: Tagging what version is related to the question (in most cases, the cause of the issue), were you say: Tagging what version is related to the answer (in most cases the solution of the issue)
    – iRon
    Feb 3 at 10:23
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    @iRon no, I didn’t say that. I said precisely that version tags should be added if the question was intended to aim at a specific version. I noticed that you were the questioner after writing the comment, still, I’m very confident that back in 2014 when you wrote the question, you did not intent to exclude version 7. You just asked a powershell question and that’s what the tags should reflect. So, addressing newer versions in answers (and you did update your answer) is fine. So there is no reason to add version specific tags to that question, not even in hindsight.
    – Holger
    Feb 3 at 11:33
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    Soon we might get version labels for answers as well, it might become a hell.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 3 at 11:33
  • @Trilarion Thanks. I've been following this question for a bit, thinking to myself this exact thing, that version tags, separate from subject tags, were on the table for discussion, but I couldn't recall specifically where I had read that.
    – Drew Reese
    Feb 4 at 19:19

5 Answers 5

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Version-specific tags should be used to tag questions using version-specific features of a language.

A simple example would be and , where also exists.

As the tag wiki reads:

USE ONLY IF YOUR QUESTION IS VERSION-SPECIFIC. For questions about Python programming that are specific to version 3+ of the language. Use the more generic [python] tag on all Python questions. Use the [python-2.x] tags for Python 2 questions.

Always use the generic tag.
Additionally, use the version-specific tag if necessary.

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    Still really annoying that a lot of people don't get that memo. Would be nice if we could have warnings for versioned tags like these Feb 2 at 14:16
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    Good to know, unfortunately that warning "USE ONLY IF YOUR QUESTION IS VERSION-SPECIFIC" is missing from the PowerShell version specific tag wiki's
    – iRon
    Feb 2 at 14:32
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    Then someone should add them :D
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 2 at 14:32
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    I wouldn't say that the caveat "USE ONLY IF YOUR QUESTION IS VERSION-SPECIFIC" is always warranted (I am not saying it is for Python). On the contrary sometimes even if the question isn't about a specific version sometimes having the right tag is vitally important as you know which syntax can (or likely more importantly can't) be used. I, personally, tire of the amount of answers I've given to be told by the OP "I am getting error 'Invalid syntax near...'" because they are using a version from ~10 years ago and didn't tag that version.
    – Larnu
    Feb 2 at 15:26
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    @Zoe how about they don't need a memo?
    – Braiam
    Feb 2 at 15:36
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    @Larnu: Version-specific tags are always secondary (additional info) to version-agnostic tags. As such, version-specific tags should only be used when the question concerns version-specific code / functionality. I would consider your example of syntax changes to be enough reason to require version-specific tags.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 2 at 15:43
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    @Cerbrus but how does the OP know that the answer will involve version specific solutions if they don't know how to achieve the solution? String aggregation in different versions of SQL Server is completely different depending on the version.
    – Larnu
    Feb 2 at 16:51
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    @Larnu They don't. Fortunately, there's an edit and add comment button that nearly everyone can click.
    – Kevin B
    Feb 2 at 16:55
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    Which is why it's important the version tag is used in addition to the standard tag in some environment in the beginning, @KevinB , not just when the OP is asking about specific functionality added in that version.
    – Larnu
    Feb 2 at 16:57
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    Can't the generic tag be added automatically when someone selects the version specific tag? Feb 3 at 9:54
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    @WimDeblauwe: That'd require some software changes, as there is no such link available yet, but I'd like that.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 3 at 9:58
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    @Larnu: If an asker doesn't have any idea that their question is specific to some version, they shouldn't use a versioned tag; editors can add that. But in the question body they should specify what implementation they're actually using, e.g. awk --version = GNU Awk 5.1.1, or "compiled with -std=gnu++17". Pretty much regardless of lang, whether there are versioned tags or not, especially for any languages that undergo any kind of development / evolution / updates, like Python or C++, but if it's about an error message or something then it should definitely specify the implementation. Feb 3 at 10:34
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    @Larnu: In that case, answerers will have to look at the question body for the version (which should definitely be there, otherwise the question needs to be closed in that case) instead of taking a guess and answering blindly based on just the title or something. We expect answers to answer the question body, not just title, so I don't see this as a real problem. The first SME to come along and read the question body can fix the tags to head off potential problems if the version does matter. Feb 3 at 12:29
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    @KarlKnechtel: So, you're saying that version-specific tags are useful for when it's not the "current" version. I would advice against removing the 3.x tag, as they could become critical, when the next version is released... Besides, why remove an additional tag? It's not like more information is harmful.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 4 at 12:46
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    @Karl I get your point about thr Python-3.x tag, but I agree with Cerbrus that it's probably better to not remove such tags, unless you need to in order to add the generic tag.
    – PM 2Ring
    Feb 8 at 20:09
12

Something that I think is important to this discussion that I don't see get mentioned often is that the utility of version-specific tags really depends on how important the versions themselves are to the underlying language/ framework/ system.

As an example, one of the tags I frequent is , which has two major versions right now that are both highly active– and . While they're both versions of the same framework, there are major differences between version 2 and 3, and large snippets are almost never interchangeable between the two, as some of the core mechanisms and syntax of the library are fundamentally different between the two versions.

In this case, having one or the other tag on a question is essential for curators who want to sort through posts using a specific version. This, however, isn't necessarily as true for a lot of languages/ frameworks/ systems which have version tags on Stack Overflow.

I'm not an SME in Python, but I understand that the difference between Python 2 and Python 3 is significant, with some notable syntax changes between the two, which necessitates the and tags.

That said, is it equally as useful to be able to tag and search specifically for , , , , , , and (since these are all real tags)? Does each version carry enough design changes to warrant a new tag specifically for that version?

I actually have no idea– they very well might! My point is that this likely needs to be taken on a case by case basis. In my mind, there's definitely a place for version tags where version designations are clearly important and justifiable. But at the same time, I also think that for some tags, in some cases, they probably shouldn't exist, and likely unhelpfully fragment knowledge and curation more than they help categorize posts.

The way I see it, when someone brings this up for a given topic/ tag family, the applicable SME's and the community need to collectively come up with an answer for that specific case, and decide whether version tags are useful there or whether they just get in the way instead.

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  • An example of a question that there are tags for version specific stuff, but are not necessary at all stackoverflow.com/a/34913701/792066
    – Braiam
    Feb 2 at 19:43
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    In the case of PowerShell, each major version includes new cmdlets and functionality, usually enough so to warrant the use of version-specific tags alongside the main tag. However, we should hopefully no longer be seeing new posts using powershell-3.0 and earlier anymore, and once 2012R2 sunsets, powershell-4.0 will be added to that list.
    – codewario
    Feb 2 at 22:00
  • @BendertheGreatest so, instead of have n versions + 1 tags, not have just powershell and be done with it? If you expect no new questions with previous tags, why have them at all?
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 10:17
  • "for some tags, in some cases, they probably shouldn't exist", Somehow, I feel that the breakpoint for version tags is actually where they exceed (or are equal to) the number of allowed tags minus the mandatory one (= 4). Knowing that it requires multiple tags for an issue that is resolved in a later version (e.g. a bug) and therefore applies to all preceding versions. In other words, in the case there are more than e.g. 4 versions, it makes more sense (to me) to tag it version-specific and define the actual versions in the content of the question/answer.
    – iRon
    Feb 3 at 10:36
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    @Braiam Many questions exist specific to older versions, and newer solutions won't work for legacy environments using Windows XP/2003 through Windows 7/2008R2. These environments still exist, and while new questions likely won't be asked, we do still see some askers of prior versions in legacy environments. It's useful to tag these older versions so they are both easier to find for the niche admins searching on that version, for askers so they don't get solutions which don't work in their environment, and for answerers to reconsider whether they know the answer for that version.
    – codewario
    Feb 3 at 14:35
  • In addition, the powershell and powershell-core tags absolutely need to remain separated, especially the jump from 5.1 to 6.0. Keep in mind this is all PS specific, what works for this language would not make sense for all programming languages in regards to version specific tags.
    – codewario
    Feb 3 at 14:39
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    While niche admins might search for an answer to a specific version, it seems to me to make more sense to version the answers, and not the questions. Then anyone in a legacy environment can find the answer they need and we don't end up with almost duplicate questions with slightly different version numbers. Feb 3 at 19:13
  • @BendertheGreatest yet the same problems exist on those older versions: how to set a specific registry key dword? How to shut down the pc programmatically? etc etc etc, those things don't need versions on the question at all.
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 20:05
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    It is still useful for the asker to be able to communicate which version they are on. Its historical significance is still important. PowerShell has had a weird history with versions, and still does. It made sense back then to differentiate between PS v2 and the current version at the time, and it still makes sense moving forward as the syntax and available built-ins and features change across major releases. I would say that tracking between minor releases would be overkill in the case of PowerShell, but the major versions make sense for this language.
    – codewario
    Feb 3 at 20:21
  • I'd love to see java-9 and java-10 all be migrated to java-11, and java-12, java-13, java-14, java-15, and java-16 be migrated to java-17. Nobody cares which 6-month-but-now-EOL release a feature was introduced in. Stick with GA tags. Feb 4 at 4:35
  • "I'm not an SME in Python, but I understand that the difference between Python 2 and Python 3 is significant, with some notable syntax changes between the two, which necessitates the python-2.x and python-3.x tags." There are significant differences, and there was a time when the minor-version tags for 2.x would have had some relevance. That era is long passed, however. 2.x is two years past its sunset date. Feb 4 at 12:10
4

I feel that the necessity of using a version tag on a question depends on the language that is being asked about.

Let's, firstly, look at , or more specifically , which as mentioned in another answer states the following in it's usage guidance:

USE ONLY IF YOUR QUESTION IS VERSION-SPECIFIC

So here the tag is specifically stating that a version tag should only be used if the syntax you are using is specific to Python 3; if it's generally about Python it shouldn't be. Most likely this is something that the Python Community within Stack Overflow has come to a decision on to add to the tag (I don't actually know, I not part of that community).

Conversely let's look at the tags in my expert domain, . In the wiki for said tag it notes the complete opposite for :

Tagging Recommendation

It is recommended to use the tag together with the version- and/or edition-specific tag

So here, if you are tagging then you should also be tagging the version, for example . For SQL Server this is actually incredibly important. A new release of the product comes out every 2/3 years, and they almost always bring a wealth of new functions and features that prior versions are "envious" of (STRING_SPLIT in 2016 and STRING_AGG in 2017 are great examples, as how to achieve their behaviours are probably the most common question in the tag). There are also features that are removed or changed from editions.

As an answerer, knowing what features you can, or can't, use is therefore very important. Some questions cannot be answered reliably until the version is known, and so the tag for the version being added vitally important. Adding the tag after answer(s) are given could easily invalidate the answers; something that is very frowned upon.

As for , I will admit I didn't actually start using it until Powershell 5, and i'm not a subject expert. I do, however, know that there are quite a few difference between Powershell 5- and Powershell 6+ (which are/were known as Powershell Core). Even if the version tags for 1-5 aren't really relevant, it likely is important to know if a user is using "core" or not.


Either way, version tags are incredibly important. For those answering it means that they know what syntax can or can't be used. It also means that a question might be ignored by users that don't have access to that version, or because the version is so old or new they don't know enough about that version (I, for example avoid the few questions I see about SQL server 2000 as I never used it and it lacks a lot of functionality that even SQL Server 2008 had).

Like wise a user looking for an answer on an older version of the product may look at the question/answers still, but know that their attempts may fail if they are using an older version.


It's also worth noting that Version labels for Answers is planned to be added in the future, which I (personally) think will be a great addition. This means that even if a question is tagged with a specific version (or doesn't have a version tag at all), a new answer making use of new features could be added at a later date which the tags of the new version on that answer only. This means that anyone consuming the answer knows whether or not they can make use of said answer by knowing their version.

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  • "knowing what features you can, or can't, use is therefore very important" I was under the impression that you were answering to the future reader, not just the asker. The last time I needed trim in mssql the answer was using trim() or ltrim(rtrim()) depending on the version. That answer was more useful to me since the author didn't limit itself to whatever version the asker had.
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 12:09
  • TRIM, however, has additional feature to LTRIM/RTRIM, @Braiam . You can't do RTRIM('()' FROM LTRIM('()' FROM MyColumn)) for example, but you can do TRIM('()' FROM MyColumn)
    – Larnu
    Feb 3 at 12:10
  • But I just needed trimming whitespaces, and that's what the answer did for any version of mssql server under the sun. I don't care about additional features, I want to solve my problem (removing whitespaces) and the answer did that for any user that read it. For those people, people that actually want to solve problems, having a separate question and answer for every version is counter productive.
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 12:12
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    I didn't say there should be separated questions for different versions, @Braiam ... Where are you reading I say this? In fact, the Version Labels for Answers proposal would make that even less needed.
    – Larnu
    Feb 3 at 12:13
  • You are advocating for version specific tags, with version specific answers, that would exclude answers that are not targeted for the version not listed on the question. The logical conclusion to that is that we will create a new Q&A pair for each new version. Heck, some people already do this every time there's a new version of xcode, android, etc.
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 12:18
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    I am advocating for version tags, @Braiam, I didn't say i advocate for different questions for every version; those words were never typed into my keyboard. You're putting words into my answer.
    – Larnu
    Feb 3 at 12:24
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    "if the syntax you are using is specific to Python 3". Maybe more specific to PowerShell (than Python or SQL) versions: what if I have done some homework prior asking and already aware that the issue is related to all versions prior a specific version (let's say prior 5.1) and seeking for a workaround (for e.g. something similar of using the Get-ComputerInfo. Just adding the version "I am using", will (to my opinion) actually take of value from my tagging...
    – iRon
    Feb 3 at 12:35
0

As I see it, a tag acts in two ways:

  • First, it focuses the question on a specific version of a tool, so the answers can be appropriate for that reality. For example, MySQL 8 is quite a different animal compared to MySQL 5, and answers benefit from the version detail in this case.

  • Second, it provides a search criteria when [casual] users are searching for posts.

Now, I think "version tags" serve the first goal quite well. However, I feel that they fail the second one. To be honest, I don't think many people use wildcards (like mysql*) when searching for a tag.

Off the top of my head, I see two solutions for the issue:

  • Multi-tag questions. For example, the OP could tag the question with mysql and mysql-8 as well. In an extreme case the OP could tag with mysql, mysql-8, mysql-5, and mariadb. However, I don't think we should ask the OP to do this. Besides, there's a limit of 5 tags per question and I don't think they should be used in synonyms. And that brings me to...

  • Implement automatic synonyms in stackoverflow searches. This won't require the OPs to strictly behave "correctly" but will resolve the problem automatically behind the scenes. This is common in search engines that consider mysql related to mysql-5 and mysql-8. In a second degree of similarity they can also be related to maria-db or even to mispelled strings such as mysl. Of course, this is probably a major request to the stackoverflow engine, but it's just an idea.

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  • If that's how tags work in the practice, then the main purpose is lost: Tags are a means of connecting experts with questions they will be able to answer by sorting questions into specific, well-defined categories. How version specific tags fulfill this specific purpose?
    – Braiam
    Feb 6 at 2:26
-15

What is the use of version tags?

As someone that has been on several sites that had version specific tags, there's no use for them if there's more than one topic that has versions on topic. It is supposed to be used sparingly, but that is hard to police.

The usage is if the question is "version specific", but I rarely found any issue that is version specific that isn't also transient (think bugs where the only solution is literally patch the stuff), which invariably turns those questions in effectively bug reports. Heck, I've even created the patch for one of those. On the other hand, there has been rarely any question where I can't answer authoritatively that the version has been relevant to the answer as I build my answer to be forward and backwards proof, which is the best™ way to answer questions and prevent answer obsolescence which is a ongoing issue. The only argument I've seen for it is busybody categorization.

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    So, how about features that are only available in a new version of a language? Syntax that changed between versions of languages? Why shouldn't we add a tag to clarify that? "it is busybody categorization" isn't a very compelling argument... That just boils down to "I don't like it."
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 2 at 15:57
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    I'm not quite sure what point this answer is trying to make. If an issues is not transient, it seems to be version unspecific by definition. Feb 2 at 16:00
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    @Cerbrus or conversely - functionality only available in old versions of the language. There are still a few environments here and there that do not use ES6+ features for JavaScript, so occasionally we do get questions that would exclude new versions and only want to know how something is done in an old version. We also get questions about AngularJS which is the older version of Angular. And similar for other libraries.
    – VLAZ
    Feb 2 at 16:14
  • @Cerbrus addendum to an answer like it's done here stackoverflow.com/a/34913701/792066 So, I don't see the point.
    – Braiam
    Feb 2 at 19:42
  • @MisterMiyagi I hear you, I regularly remove version specific tags from questions I find. But ask yourself this, if someone finds it without version tag but the question mention a version, what's the thing that is likely to happen?
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 10:04
  • @Braiam Sorry, I still don't get the point you are trying to make. Perhaps explicitly pointing out what happens or is the case and why that is bad would be helpful. Feb 3 at 10:11
  • @MisterMiyagi people has a fetishism to add version tag to all questions, no matter what. Just because. Considering that, then, what is the stated purpose of version tags vs what actually happens?
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 10:16
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    "people has a fetishism to add version tag to all questions, no matter what" I cannot second that impression. In the tags I frequent, I rarely see overspecified versions; the frequent major-version tags are appropriate (or at the very least not harmful) and minor-version tags usually only get added after the issue has been pinpointed. Feb 3 at 10:24
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    "fetishism", "busybody categorization"... May I suggest using a less derogatory / aggressive choice of words to make your point? You're also basically claiming people just add versioned tags "because they wanna" and then ask us how that helps... The burden of proof is on you to prove that that's how versioned tags are used.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 3 at 11:15
  • @Cerbrus but it is fetishism and it's busybody categorization. No one has an practical example showing me when version tagging has been useful (and remember, I was very active on two sites that have version tags, one of which got rid of it). I breath and ate version tagging on the daily, never was useful to me. In fact, it was a detriment, since questions that I should have been able to answer, wouldn't have presented to me, since only the version tag was used.
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 20:08
  • @MisterMiyagi I've seen people adding version tags on questions years after the fact (python, html and css) where answers demonstrate that there are solutions for every possible iteration of the software in question. Practically, needlessly categorizing something as more "specific" than the problem itself as presented is.
    – Braiam
    Feb 3 at 20:10
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    There are good examples of practical usage of versioned tagging in the other answers here… You just choose to ignore it, and call it names… Not exactly constructive.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 3 at 21:30
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    @MisterMiyagi There are certainly questions where it is useful to know which version of a thing people are using. But that doesn't require a tag; it only requires people to include the information in their question. For it to be useful as a tag, both the author and future searchers need to know which versions their problem applies to; and that is rarely the case. If someone tags a question for python-3.6 because they believe that's what they're using (correctly or not), that does not help someone searching for the same problem but using python 3.7.
    – khelwood
    Feb 5 at 20:01
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    @MisterMiyagi "I think the Python 2 and 3 information in these questions is relevant because the respective issues don't apply to the other" well, here's the thing, I think I can count with the fingers of my hand that there are valid questions that would be applicable to one version and not the other, and most people I've seen expert at python, are capable of answering all of them (integer division, print(), etc.). So, I ask, if they can answer those questions regardless, why having more tags?
    – Braiam
    Feb 7 at 18:46

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