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It is possible to submit a revision for review BEFORE that post could again be closed and negative reputation applied?

To go into more detail, I posted a software-related question to Stack Overflow not long before making this post but that post was closed. Another user began communicating with me for a few minutes using the "add comments" section to clarify the reasons. I have a revision prepared that hopefully will meet the requirements we discussed, but I do not know how to submit my changes to that user so that I can verify that my new post will meet the requirements we discussed. Is it possible to do this?

The complication is with the reputation system on this site, specifically that I was given negative reputation "points" for reasons I do not understand given that I was more than happy to revise the question to fit the requirements.

Can you please tell me how I can submit my revised post for review without risking the problem with having it closed again and having problems with this reputation points system?

To clarify the context of my above questions, I have used this site off and on over the course of several years and have NEVER had a problem like this one before. This site has always been very professional with very polite, knowledgeable, and helpful people, so I am quite disturbed by being docked "reputation points" due to posting-related technicalities. I am more than willing to make any revision to my posts to conform to the standards (even though I strongly disagree with some of those standards). I am interested in asking a serious development question and have no interest whatsoever in having the finer points of a reputation system get in the way of doing so.

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How do I find out who rejected a post on Stack Overflow and submit a revision for review BEFORE that post could be rejected and negative reputation applied?

I mean, there is a review system for questions which are automatically identified as potentially low quality, although this doesn't stop you from posting it. In addition, you did receive a warning from the question asking form suggesting that your question could have issues. But in any case, most of the reviewing process happens by curators, and after the question was asked. In this case, at least three users with certain privileges, me included, found that the question needed more focus, and so it was closed as such.

I posted a software-related question to Stack Overflow not long ago but someone rejected my post. I do not know if it was the same user, but someone began communicating with me for a few minutes using the "add comments" section to clarify the reasons. I have a revision prepared that hopefully will meet the requirements we discussed, but I do not know how to contact any of the user(s) involved (most importantly whomever rejected my post) so that I can verify that my new post will meet the requirements.

That is not the way to go here. Rather than trying to pester the users who voted to close, you would edit the question with that revision and check the box that says your question is ready to be reviewed. This makes the question enter the reopen queue, from which curators observe closed questions to check whether they are in condition to be reopened.

Also note that any clarification that you might also obtain from other users is nice to have, but not something that is demanded from volunteers.

I have used this site off and on over the course of several years and have NEVER had a problem like this one before. This site has always been very professional with very polite, knowledgeable, and helpful people,

Users definitely tend to have a good experience for as long as they use the platform as intended and work towards quality questions and answers. This issue is what we call the primary clash of expectations. Expecting any question about programming to be on-topic is one example of this.

so I am quite disturbed by being docked "reputation points" due to posting-related technicalities.

Any reputation points lost from the question mentioned will be recovered when the question is deleted. Or, in the event that you manage to edit it into shape, it will organically receive upvotes over time, which offsets the downvotes.

But for what it's worth, reputation is not worth that much in this platform, unless for folks who are indeed interested in continuing to maintain the knowledge within. The privileges of asking and answering questions does not require any reputation (although they can be taken away for other reasons). So there is no need to fret much over downvotes. Understanding what kind of questions are considered on-topic is already a good step.

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  • Thanks, the "Clash of Expectations" thread explains a lot. A suggestion: I was a user who came across this site because there are VERY few places these days (at least that I have found) for developers to exchange knowledge with each other. So, given that most people who come here are looking for a forum, perhaps it needs to be explained in a very CONCISE way (just like with the rules of posting) that this site operates in a very unusual manner compared to regular forums. (to be continued)
    – ag87
    Jan 21 at 21:30
  • There is already info about this, but very few people read the rules of a forum because they are always too long, obvious (don't use obscene language etc.) and we just want to ask our question and get on with our day. A few short sentences when someone signs up for an account would help.
    – ag87
    Jan 21 at 21:30
  • Re "not something that is demanded from volunteers": There was no demanding. I appreciate when people answer my questions and always offer thanks (a big problem on this site, by the way in how you handle polite responses - if someone says "thank you" you should NOT delete it. No wonder there are so many upset users about this if nothing else. Politeness is NOT "fluff").
    – ag87
    Jan 21 at 21:34
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    it it's simplest form, the explanation of what StackOverflow is and how it should be used is... Ask questions, get answers. The tour does a great job of quickly getting to this point. However... it does a poor job of getting into the intricacies of what makes this place tick. What kinds of questions are successful, and what kinds of questions aren't. Even the example question in the tour is a rather... poor example of a useful question. If we can't even get things entirely right in a way that gets through to users with the tour, we have little hope in doing it on signup.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 21 at 21:34
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
    – Stephen Rauch Mod
    Jan 22 at 13:32

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