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I've been suspended now for the second time because I thought that a given audit post needed further information.

In both cases the post does not contain any supporting description. According to my understanding in an quality post the poster shares why (s)he thinks the suggested solution might be helpful for the OP's problem.

So, that's why I picked "Share feedback". Did I misunderstand something?

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  • 1
    You don't need to share why you think your solution is helpful in your answers, no. You can explain why/how your answer works if you want, but it's not required. The difference between an answer that does or doesn't is that one might be a good right answer, and the other a great right answer.
    – Larnu
    Jan 20 at 16:42
  • 4
    you don't need to, but leaving a comment expressing that when it is missing shouldn't fail an audit.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 20 at 16:43
  • 1
    Not a dupe, but maybe useful as a reference: Is it consensus that commenting should (not) lead to failing review audits?
    – Tom
    Jan 20 at 16:46
  • 4
    Those are pretty frustrating audit failures, I really don't think you did anything wrong with those posts.
    – zcoop98
    Jan 20 at 16:47
  • 5
    The whole "Share feedback" is silly. With the options presented it should be equivalent to "Looks OK", but it's treated as "flagging" or "recommending deletion".
    – yivi
    Jan 20 at 16:50
  • 2
    When selecting audits the system should have an upper score limit. A score of 5 in in less than a week is indicative of a post receiving votes due to usefulness/interest, not quality, which often leads to incorrect audits. Maybe even limit by views.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 20 at 16:53
  • For the second answer, what explanation should they have given? I'm not familiar with the tech but npx clear-npx-cache is clear enough without need to clarify that it clears the npx cache. Still, you can use "share feedback" to leave a comment, which can be done to suggest improvements to an already acceptable answer, so I don't think it should be an audit failure per se.
    – Laurel
    Jan 20 at 17:23

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