41

This is the post. The title has usually been "How do I calculate square root in Python?", but the body is actually about a problem that's specific to division in Python 2 (namely that 1/2 is 0, not 0.5). So if you're not using Python 2 (which you shouldn't be since it's EOL), the top answer and most of the second answer are useless for you, but unfortunately due to the title, the question has solidified into the canonical question about square root in Python.

There have been multiple edits to change the title, but OP has rolled back all of them:

  • "Why does raising to a fractional power sometimes give the wrong answer?"
  • "How do I calculate square root in Python without using math.sqrt?"
  • "Why does a fractional power give the wrong result while a float works?"
  • "Why does Python give the "wrong" answer for square root?"

(Full disclosure: I've made some of these edits, including the one today.)

On the other hand, with the changed title, we don't have a canonical question for square root in Python.

So, I'm thinking, is there a way we could split the post into two separate posts? They're both good questions in their own right, so I'd love OP to get credit for them, but having them smushed together makes no sense. We'd have to split the answers too of course; some only cover the Python 2 issue while others only cover the generic question.

Otherwise, what other options do we have? How should we handle this? Maybe we could make a community wiki question?

P.S. I'd be happy to roll back my edits today while we discuss this, in the spirit of BRD.


Update: A mod has closed the post as a duplicate of Why does the division get rounded to an integer?, which seems like a good move. That leaves us with what to do about a canonical square root question. I'm strongly leaning towards writing my own community wiki.


Update 2: I posted a canonical question with a community wiki answer: How do I calculate square root in Python? If anyone thinks I should make the question a community wiki too, I'm all ears.

34
  • 10
    We do already have a canonical for Python division (which is python 2 specific). So this post either should be a duplicate of that or changed to be about square root only. I don't know if making it just about square root is possible, though, as that question really is just about the division error... Jan 19 at 4:47
  • 2
    "On the other hand, with the changed title, we don't have a canonical question for square root in Python." Do we actually need one? Jan 19 at 8:24
  • 2
    Sure, and a canonical for "how to perform substraction" as well. Just in case.
    – yivi
    Jan 19 at 8:25
  • 5
    @MisterMiyagi: Yes, we do apparently. If the question wasn't useful to many people it wouldn't have 165 upvotes so far. Things that seem trivial can be useful for people just starting up with the language or with programming in general.
    – user000001
    Jan 19 at 8:31
  • 2
    If the OP just refuses just leave it; I don't know why they are against having the title changed, though (perhaps it is childishness, as even a mod revision was rolled back). If it points to other well received duplicate candidates, or it is pointed to by other well received duplicates then even if someone doesn't hit that question initially after a search, they will after an extra click. It does make the question a bit of an XY Problem though. They are asking how to perform a square root, but actually they need to ask how to perform integer division.
    – Larnu
    Jan 19 at 9:45
  • 9
    Of course, changes should be made when it's an obvious improvent, @Lundin. In this case, changing the question from the logically wrong "How to calculate square root in Python?" (which could be easily answered without really addressing the presented issue) to something that actually describes the problem at hand is seen as an "obvious improvement" by many. In cases like this, "correctnes" usually trumps "ownership" on the site, in line with the goal of building a high quality Q&A repository.
    – yivi
    Jan 19 at 11:08
  • 18
    Actually @Lundin, we kinda can. And it's been done many times. When an OP rejects and stubbornly rollbacks improvements made by editors, sometimes mods do step in and end up locking the post for edits. You say "this isn't wikipedia", but in reality we do share some commonalities.
    – yivi
    Jan 19 at 11:16
  • 2
    @Lundin This is beside the point, but check that number, 26. Revision 1 doesn't count, and the OP did at least 11 of the remaining changes. There are actually 8 revisions that modified the topic in whole or in part.
    – wjandrea
    Jan 19 at 11:28
  • 2
    @wjandrea It's quite a common scenario that someone asks a question about something but the actual problem happens to be something else entirely. That alone doesn't motivate an edit, but is rather a reason not to edit. But it seems that the root of the problem is that people have started treating this question as a canonical, while it is fact not very good at all and shouldn't have been used as such, nor should it have been up-voted to the skies.
    – Lundin
    Jan 19 at 11:32
  • 8
    @Lundin re: license - actually, it is not true at all. The CC-BY-SA license allows complete and unrestricted modification of the work provided the changes are clearly indicated (see attribution terms) [and the license is compatible due to the "SA" part]. CC family is very permissive, and the author waives nearly all claims on the content. The only valid case where the author would be in their right to enforce their revision is if the licensee attributed the changed revision to the author. Jan 19 at 11:45
  • 3
    Woah, I thought this was just some 2 rep newbie who asked this question, the fact that it is a 20k member completely changes the context of the question
    – Krupip
    Jan 19 at 14:53
  • 4
    @Krupip: The question was asked in 2012. We don't know how much rep OP had back then, but I suspect it would be way lower than 20k.
    – user000001
    Jan 19 at 16:25
  • 3
    @Lundin NP. There was, indeed, a discussion about adopting MIT for code back in 2016, but the decision on that has been delayed indefinitely and never took effect. Thus, all contributions, including code, are governed by the CC BY-SA license. The only difference is that the post in question is licensed under the terms of CC BY-SA 3.0 which is not that different from the 4.0 version and still allows an unrestricted modification of the content provided proper attribution. Jan 19 at 18:12
  • 4
    @user000001 The question may have been posted in 2012 but the OP wrote a comment demanding that people not fix the title in 2019. Jan 19 at 19:50
  • 3
    meh, new title isn't as misleading as the original. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    – Kevin B
    Jan 20 at 16:30

8 Answers 8

12

The legal/technical angle

While we are each the author and copyright holder of content that we post, and our culture grants much deference to the author of a post, by participating in this site we have each granted a license to Stack Overflow (and its delegates, the community) to modify our posts.

Multiple users have indicated over the years that the title of this post does not match the content and, for the sake of clarity, have tried to amend the title to better match its content. You say that "we don't have a canonical question for square root in Python" and, while this has been disputed, it's also possible that the lack of truly canonical answers has, in part, been due to the author's resistance to modifying the title and thus clearing space for just that question.

If an author is unhappy with the community's edits, they may ask to be disassociated from their post, but the post is not "theirs" in any way that prevents others from "changing the title and content".

The practical angle

All legal issues aside, edit wars are frustrating for everyone and cause rancor and bad feelings. We have enough of that already, so while the site has every right to make appropriate edits, the title and content are not so terribly disparate as to justify the kind of efforts that would be required to divorce this author from the ability to rollback the post.

Closing as a duplicate is fair as it clarifies the post's content while still leaving it available for others to find (via whatever search mechanism they prefer), read and upvote, etc.

I would also echo the advice of others to write a self-answered question that can serve as a canonical reference for how to find the square root of a number in Python, if no such post already exists. While it may take a long time to build up the same level of views, etc, as the post under question, if it's truly useful and needed, then it will win out in the long-run.


Legal angle addendum

As requested, here is the portion of the license text that I personally find most relevant (IANAL):

Subscriber Content

You agree that any and all content, including without limitation any and all text, graphics, logos, tools, photographs, images, illustrations, software or source code, audio and video, animations, and product feedback (collectively, “Content”) that you provide to the public Network (collectively, “Subscriber Content”), is perpetually and irrevocably licensed to Stack Overflow on a worldwide, royalty-free, non-exclusive basis pursuant to Creative Commons licensing terms (CC BY-SA 4.0), and you grant Stack Overflow the perpetual and irrevocable right and license to access, use, process, copy, distribute, export, display and to commercially exploit such Subscriber Content, even if such Subscriber Content has been contributed and subsequently removed by you as reasonably necessary to, for example (without limitation):

  • Provide, maintain, and update the public Network
  • Process lawful requests from law enforcement agencies and government agencies
  • Prevent and address security incidents and data security features, support features, and to provide technical assistance as it may be required
  • Aggregate data to provide product optimization

Note that due to the age of the post it is technically governed by CC BY-SA 3.0, as indicated in the post history.

Section 3 of the CC allows derivative works:

to create and Reproduce Adaptations provided that any such Adaptation, including any translation in any medium, takes reasonable steps to clearly label, demarcate or otherwise identify that changes were made to the original Work. For example, a translation could be marked "The original work was translated from English to Spanish," or a modification could indicate "The original work has been modified.";

I believe SO satisfies this requirement through its edit history and post timeline.

13
  • The problem with writing a self-answered question is that I don't want to take credit for it (rep or otherwise). The OP might see it sort of like pushing them out of their spot. I'll see if I can do a community wiki question.
    – wjandrea
    Jan 19 at 19:16
  • 15
    @wjandrea "The OP might see it sort of like pushing them out of their spot." it... literally is, that'd literally be the prupose of taking this action whether you make it a community wiki or not. Take credit for putting in the effort to make the site a better resource.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 19 at 19:52
  • @Kevin True, thanks, but I mean, OP saw the utility of having a question about square root in general back in 2012, though the way they wrote it is not ideal. Should I invite OP to post the canonical question about square root?
    – wjandrea
    Jan 19 at 20:15
  • 13
    No, you shouldn't. They could've updated their question at any time to match the title. They didn't. They've effectively "squatted" a commonly googled query and raked in upvotes with a question that doesn't fit. Jan 19 at 20:51
  • 1
    I took your advice and posted a self-answered question: How do I calculate square root in Python? :)
    – wjandrea
    Jan 20 at 21:24
  • 4
    "...edit wars are frustrating for everyone and cause rancor and bad feelings..." So we avoid them and duplicate content instead? I agree with the legal part but not with the practical part. Closing as duplicate is only possible if there was a prior question with the same scope. Instead I advice to really solve this edit war one way or another. And meta is the place to solve these kind of conflicts with moderators simply enforcing the consensus. If the edit war then continues, moderators should simply hand out suspensions.
    – Trilarion
    Jan 21 at 8:22
  • @Trilarion - It sounds like you are suggesting a mod ban every time there's an unresolvable difference of opinion. If so, not only would the community find such draconian measures untenable, but the mods themselves would likely rather quit than be forced to make those kinds of decisions. Suspensions are the last resort and typically used to deal with users who are defacing content, etc. You would have your work cut out for you swaying me that in this case the OP is defacing their content.
    – JDB
    Jan 21 at 21:58
  • @JDB I also think suspensions should be last resort. After commenting here I extended my ideas into a full answer and there I repeat that suspensions should be last resort but actually the way to resolve conflicts that cannot be resolved otherwise.
    – Trilarion
    Jan 21 at 22:34
  • 1
    Could you quote the part of the license that says that SO is allowed to modify my post and leave it under my name? That would be the weirdest copyright ever. I gave SO rights to my content to do with it as they please, but certainly not with my name under it. That's like saying Mozart is in the public domain, now I can change it as I want and still say it's Mozart. It's not Mozart if you changed it and the legal right to create derivative works does not change the fact that you cannot attribute the changes to the original author.
    – nvoigt
    Jan 24 at 10:30
  • 3
    @nvoigt - The full edit history is available for every post. I never said, or implied, that SO can edit your content as if you had written it that way. The last user to edit the post is clearly identified (as you can see from this very post), as well as the original author.
    – JDB
    Jan 24 at 17:59
  • 1
    @nvoigt - Updated as requested.
    – JDB
    Jan 24 at 18:23
  • Well, actions speak louder than words, don't they? SO will dock my account magic internet points if someone finds the post "not helpful". So... it is in my name. Unless you can vote on the edit history, that little fine print does not mean anything.
    – nvoigt
    Jan 24 at 18:50
  • 2
    @nvoigt - That has nothing to do with either copyright or content licensing. That is an entirely separate issue. As I said in my post, content authors, by custom, are given great deference for their posts. In my experience, mods lean toward the post author in case of a disagreement (unless the author is in violation of terms of service). Editors get no points and have little incentive to edit a post beyond just being helpful (or trying).
    – JDB
    Jan 24 at 19:07
9

At this point there is, in truth, little you can do; people constantly performing "rollback wars" is not healthy for the site. Multiple people have tried to edit the question to be more representative of what the question is about, including a mod, and the OP has rolled back all of these changes. For some reason, they are not open to the question being amended to be about the actual problem. The question would possibly be a candidate for being locked if this continues, so that further edits can't be made.

As such the question is effectively an XY Problem; the OP is asking about how to perform a square root in Python, because they've tried and not got the result they expect, but what they should actually be asking about is how to perform integer division in Python.

So what can be done? Well I think that the closure by Zoe ♦ as a duplicate of question about division in Python is correct; that does indeed answer the actual question the OP has. Other than that, nothing. The question is clearly still helpful, and I suspect that people that are searching for something like "How to perform a square root in Python" are going to get directed to the question; it will tell them how to do it even though the question isn't actually asking that "under the hood".

The duplicate here is good though. If someone does land on the question and wants to know about division then they have another answer they can read. Duplicates and good signposts are great for the community; especially when there are similar, but distinctly different ways of asking the same question. This means that people with different, albeit the same, question can get directed to the same resource, which answers their question. This is just another example of that.

So leave it be; yes, the title is wrong for what the problem is, but the question has proven to be helpful to others, even if the question being asked and the problem needed to be solved is different.

4
  • 7
    You say nothing can be done here, but seeing who the user who posted the question is, this question appears to be a 20k user... you can definitely name and XXXXX those people. Also, regardless of how you, Larnu, feel about the questions duplicate status, the origional title for the question was god awful. "How do I calculate square root in Python" yet says "Yes, I know import math and use sqrt. But I'm looking for an answer to the above." That question title is objectively wrong and misleading. The current one is way better. "Why does Python give the "wrong" answer for square root?"
    – Krupip
    Jan 19 at 14:59
  • 1
    I didn't say that the [original] title is good, @Krupip , I didn't defend it's use. I actually imply that the suggest title is better, as it would be about what the question is actually about. None of that changes my point that people continually changing the title, and the OP rolling it back is not healthy.
    – Larnu
    Jan 19 at 15:03
  • 6
    The problem with just leaving it is that I want a clear canonical question I can point newbies to, but this question isn't good for that. It's centered on a problem that no longer exists in Python.
    – wjandrea
    Jan 19 at 21:30
  • @krupip in order to become a 20k user, it helps to have questions with clickbait titles. :) So 20k users don't necessarily know any better. Jan 21 at 16:25
8

Downvote

The "math construct", if I can say so, of the question is an exponent; the `**` means exponent. It just so happens that OP chose 1/2 as their example value of choice. Considering that a number to the power of 1/2 is the equivalent of the square root of that number they chose that question title.

But square root has nothing to do with the question space from a programmatic point of view.

The title is misleading because it's circumstantial that the exponent is one half. The same question could be asked about the value x = 27, then 27 ** 0.3, then 27 ** 1/3. I dare to believe that a general consensus could be reached on the value of not asking one post for every declination of that particular question.

Henceforth, I maintain that any mention of square root in this question is misleading. That question is not about square root in any form or intent, it's about exponential math, and then, accessorily, about the particular value of the exponent math, which happens to be integer division in the context of python 2.

That question has nothing to do with square roots and is deserving of the label of "unclear".

11
  • 2
    Now the question title ask two disparaged questions which makes it also too broad :D
    – Braiam
    Jan 20 at 17:37
  • Why do you say the question is about exponential math when the problem occurs in the division?
    – wjandrea
    Jan 20 at 21:09
  • The question is about square roots in at least some respects, because that's where the problem came up. Even if the cause of the problem is more general, it's still useful as a signpost (duplicate) for other people with the same problem in the same context.
    – wjandrea
    Jan 20 at 21:11
  • @wjandrea I believe I have explained rather clearly my reasoning here, is there a part I could make even clearer? Like, is it not clear from my post that it being square root (instead of cubic root for instance) is really just chance? Jan 20 at 22:42
  • Agreed. But even XY questions like that get 1000+ upvotes, presumably because all of those voters are also confused in the same way. Eternal September.
    – Fizz
    Jan 21 at 11:30
  • @Fizz just curious : why do you think the linked question is about an XY problem? Jan 21 at 16:28
  • @EricDuminil -s ours vs -X ours. Git is confusing like that.
    – Fizz
    Jan 21 at 17:31
  • @Fizz okay, but that's not an XY problem is it? It would if OP wanted to, say, repair their bathroom or travel to Spain. Jan 21 at 18:01
  • They wanted to ask about the "theirs" counterpart of one of those switches but asked about the counterpart to the other one. And then, after a bunch of answers were posted, the OP posted an "UPDATE" to their question that they were really asking about the counterpart to the other switch.
    – Fizz
    Jan 21 at 18:20
  • And see this comment: stackoverflow.com/questions/173919/… and another stackoverflow.com/questions/173919/… "the accepted answer is dangerous since it seems to answer what OP wanted but not what his question (title) actually asks."
    – Fizz
    Jan 21 at 18:27
  • @Félix I mean, you're saying you could generalize to cube root, 4th root, etc, but you could also generalize to any other operation besides exponentiation like multiplication for example, i.e. "Why is x*(1/n) always 0?" It's really the division that's the crucial part; that's where the actual problem is happening.
    – wjandrea
    Jan 21 at 22:06
3

How can we handle a question where the problem in the title is different from the problem in the body, and OP refuses to change the title?

Meta is the place to handle situations where different contributors cannot agree on the right course of action. Simply ask for the problem on Meta and state that you seek to achieve consensus again.

If a consensus is reached (one answer with a clear "winning" number of votes and a clear statement of what should be done) then do that and inform all involved parties of the reached consensus. If then disruptions remain, flag for moderator attention, so moderators can reprimand contributors of the reached consensus, lock the content or, as a last resort, hand out suspensions.

It's as simple as that and works for all kind of controversies and I can also not think of any other way to solve conflicts. If you really mean it with "the content on SO belongs to everyone" as outlined in the first part of JDB's answer, then consensus is the only possible way to solve conflicts that aren't covered by existing rules.

For the specific problem: Title and body of a question must be consistent, if that is not the case, one of them must be changed and changing the title is less work than changing the body, so I would preferably change the title. So whenever you encounter the case that the title and the body aren't consistent, ask the content creator for his intentions and then edit content according to the stated intentions. If no intentions are stated preferably adapt the title to the content. If the title gets changed back, ask on Meta for consensus and if then the title still gets changed flag for moderator attention, finally move on.

Summary: Do not engage in edit wars, establish consensus and leave the enforcement to moderators.

6
  • While I agree with you in theory, it's a bit like saying that the UN is the place for nations to iron out their disputes; yet wars still happen when one or another refuses to yield to consensus. If the author of the post will absolutely not allow their title to be changed, even after a discussion on Meta, then what? Should mods "enforce" the consensus by suspending an active and helpful user over disagreement over a title? In this particular case, I would not think it helpful to push things that far.
    – JDB
    Jan 24 at 20:15
  • 1
    However, +1 for pointing out the role of Meta. This is the right place to have these discussions, not in the original post's comments or through edit battles.
    – JDB
    Jan 24 at 20:17
  • 1
    If the case is about the quality of a highly-trafficked post, yes, it's in the interest of the network as a whole to have that post in the best state it can be, regardless of what the author wants. It's why we also don't let authors just delete or deface their content.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 20:19
  • @KevinB - So in this case, in an alternate universe where the author did not relent, would you advocate for a suspension or for locking the post? The author was, after all, really trying to find a square root, so the title was not wholly wrong. Would you ban a 21k user over 10-year-old hair-splitting? Or would you lock the post and prevent any future improvement? Would it not be better to allow them to continue contributing useful content and just close this one disputed question and write up a better one?
    – JDB
    Jan 24 at 20:32
  • 2
    Lock it. That's why we have locks. This rollback war has been going on for years. One doesn't get their way just because they threw a fit.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 20:35
  • I appreciate your emphasis on consensus :) I was thinking I sort of jumped the gun by editing Merlin's question before posting on Meta, but on the other hand, the new title is in their words, and it's been a long time after the previous disputes.
    – wjandrea
    Jan 25 at 22:22
1

I vaguely recall that merging questions (which merges answers, while keeping just one of the questions, IIRC) is technically possible on SO. I'm not sure if the opposite is technically possible, i.e. to split questions. For messy XY questions like these, on a properly curated QA site, it would be split in two: the answers about how to do square root would be mod-moved to one thread and the others about division to another.

Whether SO can ever be a "properly curated QA site" is another matter.

5
  • AFAIK, this question already exist separately. So, splitting makes no sense.
    – Braiam
    Jan 21 at 13:47
  • It's not possible to split questions. At least not unless you have access to the database. You can repost (with attribution), but that won't retain any of the votes or other similar aspects.
    – Laurel
    Jan 21 at 13:50
  • @Braiam: mod-moving some answers would (make sense) though. This is easy to do with most forum-type software, including Discourse.
    – Fizz
    Jan 21 at 13:53
  • @Fizz to then have the same answers twice just that instead of different questions, the same? Again: makes no sense. We try to not have duplicate content.
    – Braiam
    Jan 21 at 13:54
  • Splitting a question is simply editing one part out and reposting it separately. My impression was that such edits have already been tried but resulted in edit wars.
    – Trilarion
    Jan 21 at 22:37
0

VTC as "unclear" because it's unclear which one they're asking (the question in the title or the question in the body).

If they're asking both, VTC as "Needs More Focus" for having multiple questions.

1
  • They're definitely asking the one in the body. So then "Needs more focus" would be applicable. Although the situation is resolved now.
    – wjandrea
    Jan 28 at 22:38
-6

The only solution that would make everyone happy is deletion:

  • The author gets to keep the post as it wants
  • The editors don't have to fight the author for keeping the question coherent
  • The community removes a bad signpost and have the bandwidth to actually create a good canonical post
  • The viewers aren't mislead by the question wasting their time

Obviously there are better solutions, but that requires that everyone is a good sport, making sure that the title and the body agree, but we can't have nice things.

3
  • 5
    change that to "make everyone unhappy" and this is quite accurate Jan 20 at 16:12
  • 3
    sometimes, everyone being unhappy is the only fair option
    – Kevin B
    Jan 20 at 16:31
  • 1
    @FélixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier everyone getting exactly what they want don't make people happy? Preposterous!
    – Braiam
    Jan 20 at 17:34
-28

I disagree both with the title change, and with the closure as a duplicate of a question about division.

It is true that the root cause of OP's problem was integer division, but the old title was better fitting to the existing answers.

The question became popular because it shows how to get a square root in Python. People searching for this found the question, and the useful answers that show how to do it.

Thus, the title should be rolled back, and the question should be reopened. There is no point in destroying a useful resource, just because OP's initial problem had a deeper cause.

16
  • 17
    Nothing was "destroyed".
    – yivi
    Jan 19 at 8:12
  • 1
    @yivi: Destroyed in the sense that with the new title, people from search engines are less likely to find the question, when searching about how to get the square root. The views in the question will likely diminish after the title change and closure.
    – user000001
    Jan 19 at 8:15
  • 18
    "It is true that the root cause of OP's problem was integer division, but the old title was better fitting to the existing answers." - that's why dupe closure makes sense. The title still indicates the problem, the dupe target covers in-depth why. Deletion doesn't make sense (and hasn't happened either), because that would be destructive. Jan 19 at 8:15
  • 7
    Closure also doesn't affect search ranking; duplicates regularly show up in searches for "non-standard" terms, and this is one of the major reasons we have duplicate closure in the first place. Jan 19 at 8:15
  • 1
    @Zoe but the people searching how to get a square root won't find the question any more due to the title change. It's hard to get a question show up as a high ranking search result, edits like this are the opposite of SEO for the question and for SO in general.
    – user000001
    Jan 19 at 8:18
  • 10
    Why not write your own question about how to get the square root in python and self answer it? It will get a high ranking eventually if it's useful. Jan 19 at 8:40
  • 1
    @RobertLongson: If the original question remains edited and closed I will do it. But a new question is sub-optimal, because a) it would be stealing points from OP, b) the old one was raked highly on search engines, it is not certain that a new question would have the same luck.
    – user000001
    Jan 19 at 8:55
  • 5
    a) suggest the OP do that via a comment on the question and do it yourself if there's no response. b) have patience, if nothing else matches and you have a good title then that should be all you need. Jan 19 at 8:57
  • 1
    "The question became popular because it shows how to get a square root in Python." That is a wild claim. Apart from reading minds, there's no way a human can confidently affirm this. To get a claim of my own: judging from the votes on the answers, it seems people were a lot more interested in the integer division than looking how to actually make a square root: the actual answer that says how to do it with an import has less than half the votes. Jan 20 at 17:06
  • 1
    @FélixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier: No I don't think so, for the vast majority of the question's lifetime the title was "How to calc square root in python", and all answers show how to do it.
    – user000001
    Jan 20 at 18:49
  • 7
    @user000001 I don't understand what you are talking about, are we looking at the same thing? the highest voted answer, posted in 2012, doesn't even mention square roots, and really simply explains the fact that 1/2 gives 0. For the vast majority of the timeline, the vastly most voted answer is not even answering how to square root, it explains integer division, and would be exactly the same with any other fraction. Jan 20 at 22:46
  • 1
    @user000001. Thanks for defending my post. Since I wrote that question, it has been my favorite question on SO. Yes, the title is somewhat incorrect to underlying problem in Python2. When I wrote that question I didnt know about interger division. There really no way to know that. With hindsight all the commentors miss this: Since I have watched the question rise in popularity, what people dont know is that the answer has always had 2 to 1 upvotes. The answer is very clever. Read the answer have a laugh, NEW question replacing this is unusable. Congrats SO. python>>> "import this"
    – Merlin
    Jan 24 at 18:18
  • 1
    If @wjandrea really want to, he could written his self answered question. SO never would have stopped him. What got to him was the old question was highly rated. Again before the mods removed much of the content, the answer was the reason it was popular -- not the question. He "stole" the title and question, and now the rep points. In so much as care about rep points, I dont. I havent read the answer LTDR, if doesnt introduce integer division, all resulting code will the "wrong answer." Thanks again.
    – Merlin
    Jan 24 at 19:19
  • @FélixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier. You are incorrect. The highly upvoted answer has this: "It's not wrong, it's the right answer to a different question." This was the best part of this answer! The mods removed the comments to this answer. That comment had almost always had half the upvote as the question upvotes. Python devs get it! We have our silly quirks. We "ask for forgiveness, not premission." The new question will likely never reach the old level of engagement, because it lacks cleverness.
    – Merlin
    Jan 24 at 22:00
  • @Zoe. IMO: The mods should not removed/edited the question and anwwers comments.
    – Merlin
    Jan 24 at 22:05

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