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When I wanted to take part in the review queue just now, I saw this message:

You’ve been suspended from reviewing. You will be able to review again in 4 days. The following tasks were handled incorrectly:

Being suspended can be a frustrating experience, but correct reviews help us maintain quality content on the site. Take a look at your review history and consider how choosing a different action would have been more appropriate.

Now I have to admit, I am really puzzled as to what I did wrong. The suspension doesn't tell me, just that I should review my post. I did so and still don't know what behavior I should correct (to be honest, I feel like every suspension should come with at least a single sentence explaining what one did wrong..).


What happened:

I found a suggested edit that added an important tag to a question. The question had many other problems that remained unfixed. This was clearly a low-effort edit, but an impactful nonetheless. Also to date I have not found any clear guidelines that would say edits that don't fix everything should be rejected.

So I approved and edited the suggestion, fixing most of the remaining problems.

Some speculations on my part about why I got suspend - and what I would counter:

  • The edit should have been rejected - The edit in question added a very relevant tag. As noted in the comments, it leaves many problems open, but I could not find official SO guidelines that would say non-trivial edits should be rejected if they don't fix all problems.
  • The edit I made on top was not good - I did not change the inherent meaning of the post, but I fixed a lot of problems, like poor grammar, typing and formatting.

So to close this off, I have two questions - probably for a moderator:

  1. What was wrong with my review and how should I adapt my behavior in the future to make correct reviews?
  2. Why was this worth a suspension? Imho, a suspension should clear quite a high bar of "you broke this rule which you should have known, had you read resource X". So far the suspension feels a bit arbitrary and to be quite frank - not fair. I would like to know where I could have found such a rule/guideline.

This is not a discussion I am aware that the community has a strong urge to discuss if partial but substantial edits should be accepted, but it has been debated numerous times and this is not the place for it. This is about my suspension. In order to be suspended, the claims you make should already be established rules on SO (you can't suspend someone for a personal opinion of some.. right..?). Please guide me to an authoritative resource that shows what I did wrong.

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    The edit was a waste of reviewer time. It should've been rejected and edited to show the editor "This is how you should be editing", instead now they've got positive reinforcement (+1 approved edits, +2 rep) telling them that adding a single tag to an awfully formatted and filled with garbage post is useful.
    – Nick
    Jan 11 at 16:20
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    There's a ton of mistyped words in the question, starting with the missing capitalization of I in the title and im instead of I'm in the first sentence. Edits have to fix all major problems of a post.
    – BDL
    Jan 11 at 16:22
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    I have some sympathy as you realised there was a lot of stuff wrong with the post and clearly spent a while editing all the crap out of it. Your only mistake was accepting and editing rather than rejecting and editing.
    – user438383
    Jan 11 at 16:29
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    Thanks for all the feedback so far. If the policy on SO is to reject all edits that don't fix all problems in a post, I could accept that and change the way I review. But really, a lot of the wording on stackexchange makes it sound like any edit that is not a trivial edit is generally a good edit. So if this is the policy, I feel like a lot of text should be updated to reflect this. I would love to quote some text snippets, but since I am still suspended, I can't open the review queues.. Also when combing through the meta stackexchange site, I found conflicting wording on this topic.
    – Neuron
    Jan 11 at 16:41
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    Not necessarily fix all problems. I tend to put it up to effort, did the editor make an honest attempt to fix what they could but left a couple issues? These things happen, maybe approve. Did they leave the post in a really poor state and fixed 1 or 2 issues while several glaring issues remain? Reject and edit. It's not just about making the site better. It's also about teaching others to make the site better.
    – Nick
    Jan 11 at 16:43
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    @nick I am not saying your way of doing it is wrong. It sounds quite plausible. I just want to know how this is definitely the only way to act in this situation. It isn't clear to me from the resources I have found, that this edit should have been rejected. I can see that some people might have a very hard stance on this and I don't criticise you for your interpretation, but I feel like handing our a suspension is quite a high bar of "you clearly broke this rule", But I just can't see how this would be justified, given the guidelines provided on stackoverflow/stackexchange
    – Neuron
    Jan 11 at 16:48
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    "I just want to know how this is definitely the only way to act in this situation" - That unfortunately won't get an easy answer, there is no one correct way of acting (in the general case). In this specific situation, I personally think the only correct action would've been to reject because of how egregious the remaining issues in the edit were, others will have a different opinion. You'd need a mod to weigh in on the suspension (you actually got caught in the crossfire of one of my mod flags about another user).
    – Nick
    Jan 11 at 16:51
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    @Nick In this specific situation, I personally think the only correct action would've been to reject because of how egregious the remaining issues in the edit were - well, but that is a very subjective opinion on how SO should operate. I value your opinion on this (and I can follow your rational), but it is not "written law" on SO. So if this was the reason for my suspension, it would not feel fair. Right now we are in this weird state where everyone reviews differently, because there are no clear guidelines. This means that if an edit gets accepted is basically a matter of luck
    – Neuron
    Jan 11 at 19:22
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    Oh I agree with you (well, to some extent of course), hence the last part, you'll need to wait for someone to else to weigh in on it, just offering my two cents :-).
    – Nick
    Jan 11 at 19:24
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    Not at all, though, i suspect this is more an edge case, and potentially an overzealous (or mitsaken) ban, rather than you being so horribly incorrect that you deserve a suspension for one case. That or there's more history that we can't see
    – Kevin B
    Jan 11 at 19:39
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    It's funny how many people are supporting of this edit, when the problem is livy, not the python code. The python code only makes a request to the rest server, and the rest server either doesn't understand it, or is misconfigured.
    – Braiam
    Jan 11 at 20:36
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    I don't see how this review is worthy of a review suspension. My reading of Meta consensus is "Together, these reasons are compelling for allowing edits, even small ones." Even if we agree with Braiam that the python tag is not required, reviewers are not expected to be subject matter experts and the question clearly contains python code. Jan 11 at 21:13
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    when the suspension is based on multiple bad reviews it should contain multiple bad review references. (that's not to say the mod didn't simply make a mistake and not include them)
    – Kevin B
    Jan 11 at 21:48
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    @Nick, even if I agree with you that times have changed (which I do agree), I don't see how we can expect a user such as Neuron who has taken the time to familiarize themselves with the Meta history of a topic to intuit a shift in policy and change their behavior. Jan 11 at 21:48
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    To me adding appropriate tags does have a value; even if the text is not improved. The reason is that many browse questions based on tags and thus it will make the question reach the correct audience that can then correct it. However, here it seemed unclear if the tag was appropriate, and many improvements could have been made without domain knowledge. Jan 12 at 9:52
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Editing in some "cold, hard facts," since the OP has re-emphasized that is what they want:

  1. I don't wish to 'steal' the link given by Oleg Valter in his first comment but a very similar instruction is given in the "How do I use the Suggested edits queue?" guide:
  • Reject and edit if the suggested edit makes the post worse or doesn’t solve critical issues with the post. Then add your own edit - this will open an edit window allowing you to improve the post.
  1. You knowingly approved/rewarded what you clearly recognized was a very poor (incomplete) edit, and you have – deservedly – received a short review suspension because of that. As an analogy, consider that you took your car for an annual check-up/repair. All 4 tyres were completely bald, one of the headlights was broken, the boot (trunk) didn't close properly, there was a large crack across the windscreen and the cigarette lighter didn't work. The repairman fixed the cigarette lighter – but did nothing else – and charged you 1,000 Euros for his efforts. Do you just blindly pay that and then take your car to a second garage to get the remaining faults corrected?

As already mentioned, both by yourself and in the comments, there was a lot more wrong with the original question than just a missing tag. In choosing "Improve Edit" (which automatically approves the original suggestion) you are sending a very wrong signal to the editor, who will likely be encouraged by the +2 reputation and go looking for numerous other questions on which to add tags but leave otherwise unimproved (thus adding an unnecessary workload on other reviewers).

As a rule of thumb, for choosing between "Improve Edit" and "Reject and Edit", I ask myself the question, "Will I be doing more than the original editor?" If the answer to that is "Yes" (as it clearly was in this case – and by a very large margin), then "Reject and Edit" is the appropriate review verdict; if the answer is "No", then "Improve Edit" may be suitable – subject to other considerations, such as whether the original edit actually harms the post.

In this case, a moderator has given you a short suspension; use the time well (as you have done in raising the issue here) and learn from the feedback so that you will be a better reviewer in the future. Such short suspensions should not be considered punishment but, rather, as highlighting a need for reviewing your reviewing technique. (There have been year-long suspensions issued, and even semi-permanent 'bans' – those can be considered punitive!)

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    The fact that there was much more to improve shouldn't be a reason to reject an edit, though - at least based on my understanding of policy! The community had this debate nearly a decade ago and settled on allowing minor edits and removing the "too minor" rejection reason. There's no existing rejection reason that makes sense for rejecting an edit because it only slightly improves a post, and the absence of such a reason was a deliberate design decision meant to make it impossible to reject such an edit without abusing a rejection reason.
    – Mark Amery
    Jan 12 at 9:47
  • There used to be an option when improving a suggested edit to indicate that the edit wasn't helpful, so the reviewer could take a suggestion that only fixes some problems but not all of them and fix the remaining problems, while marking it as a rejected edit. This was removed in 2014 when the "Reject and Edit" button was introduced, but that starts from the original version which means one must go through and make all fixes manually or copy over the suggested Markdown from the Improve Edit form.
    – gparyani
    Jan 12 at 10:01
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    thanks for providing your opinion. I am well aware that some in the community think partial edits (even though substantial) should not be accepted. But there are also a lot who think otherwise. Because so many others have raised this opinion in the comments, I explicitly asked for links to resources. If this is the reason I got a suspension, it must be an accepted rule on SO. I want to see where it says that. A meta discussion or a resource on SO that proves your point. This is not a discussion, I want cold hard evidence, not opinions ;)
    – Neuron
    Jan 12 at 11:16
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    Guidelines on reviewing suggested edits, network-wide, step 5: "If there's clear evidence that the edit makes the post worse or that it doesn't solve critical issues click either Reject or Reject and Edit.". Jan 12 at 11:22
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    @OlegValter thanks! that is what I was looking for :) can you post it as an answer, so I can accept it?
    – Neuron
    Jan 12 at 11:26
  • Next, SO guidelines on making edits (I have a couple more refs saved): "Please refrain from making multiple small edits to the same post, especially when you can only suggest edits for review by others". Jan 12 at 11:27
  • @Neuron nah, no worries :) I am sure someone will post one, don't have the bandwidth to give a comprehensive answer... Jan 12 at 11:28
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    @Oleg Just copy/paste your two comments into an answer - some kind soul may come along and suggest an edit to it. ;-P Jan 12 at 11:29
  • @Oleg Sorry about mis-spelling your name! But I can choose to spell "tyres" the British way, surely? Jan 12 at 17:43
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    @AdrianMole definitely, sorry, I did not know that "tyre" can be spelled with "y", corrected on autopilot. P.S. Actually, it's the authorities that misspelled my surname back then, so you aren't very far from the truth :) Jan 12 at 17:49

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