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I was recently banned from reviewing for two weeks because I approved a tag wiki edit that should have been rejected for plagiarism. The notice of the ban seems to be a generic "should have been rejected for plagiarism" message, without any specific details (links to the source of the copied material would be helpful). So I started looking to see where it could have come from. Eventually I found that the first paragraph of the edit appears to have come from the Introduction. Had I noticed this during the review I would have rejected the edit.

One other reviewer rejected the edit as plagiarism six days before I saw it in the queue. A moderator reviewed and rejected the edit less than a day after I approved it (which was the second approval on the edit). Is this a normal in a moderator review, or should it have been caught by a moderator follow up to the original rejection sooner?

I try to be diligent in my reviews, and I do check some things (like link additions or updates). Clearly I need to be even more diligent in reviews, particularly of tag edits. Locating a specific web page that content was copied from isn't always simple. How much time and effort should be put into checking the new text? Checking out a product's entire web site would be too much. Would using a search engine to see if some of the exact phrasing appears elsewhere be enough? That might not work if the text is in an image or video. In this case a search would have located the introduction page, but it wasn't always the first search result (depending on which text I searched for). How much copied content is too much? Is it ever appropriate to "accept and improve" the edit by removing the plagiarized content but keeping the updated links? Would a "reject and edit" (to update the links, after checking that the updates to them are appropriate) be more appropriate? Or should the entire edit be rejected with the plagiarism reason without any subsequent updates to links?

After seeing that I was banned and why, I searched here on Meta looking for plagiarism related posts, and found this one and its follow-up, Stopping tag wiki plagiarism, Part II: Taking Action. The later suggests short review bans ("just long enough to get the reviewers' attention. A single day would suffice in the vast majority of cases."). Is there a standard for how long such a ban should be? Is there a more recent meta post that mentions the longer ban? A two week review ban for one incorrect review seems excessive, but I don't know what all the moderator considered when imposing the ban.

Should there be (or is there somewhere) a guide for how to go about checking for plagiarism (hopefully in an efficient way)?

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    If you go to google, and search : apache druid "a real-time analytics database designed" it is the first result. Whether that's baseline for a ban? that's... more for the mod to decide
    – Kevin B
    Dec 23, 2021 at 20:05
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    On wiki's my main assumption is: This is plagiarized. Then I go looking for evidence to prove me wrong ...
    – rene
    Dec 23, 2021 at 20:07
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    "The later suggests short review bans ("just long enough to get the reviewers' attention. A single day would suffice in the vast majority of cases.")." - Sure, it may suggest that, it may also be very wrong, because there's every possibility a reviewer wouldn't see a short ban, or may simply click through a notification of being banned. -- "Should there be (or is there somewhere) a guide for how to go about checking for plagiarism (hopefully in an efficient way)?" - Try Google, such as in this specific case, where the plagiarism was blatant. Dec 23, 2021 at 20:13
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    Bonus: You were review banned yesterday at 15:50 (I believe in GMT, considering the dashboard doesn't offer a tooltip with the time in UTC+0), and you viewed the notice today at 18:27. This means you would've dodged the ban entirely by just under 3 hours if it was a single day. Dec 23, 2021 at 20:18
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    It is unfortunate, but rene's assumption is the correct starting point. Dec 23, 2021 at 20:24
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    Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/261592
    – TheMaster
    Dec 24, 2021 at 10:54
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    This got me recently too. I wouldn't expect to see a large amount of plagiarism nor would I have expected to have to check for it. Why is this a problem on tag wiki edits compared to questions and answers? Dec 26, 2021 at 10:49
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    No rules without tools. Punishing well-intentioned volunteers generates just one result over time: fewer volunteers. Instead of relying on volunteers to do complex academic tasks like look for plagiarism, maybe SO should adopt a detector like the one in turnItIn.com ." And, as for code plagiarism, that ship has sailed. copilot.github.com has the purpose of taking open source code and anonymizing it so it can be used under different license terms than the original.
    – O. Jones
    Dec 26, 2021 at 12:45

4 Answers 4

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A lot. A lot of effort. It sucks, but the current situation for tag wikis is broken.

Tag wikis really should be what Documentation, or Articles, or whatever you want to try to label the flavor of the day bad idea of doing this separately is... that is the space tag wikis should have allotted to them, a nice structured place which for a few bucks could be sponsored and cordoned off.

We unfortunately don't have a nice space, so in that place all sorts of well intentioned people try to fill gaps. Luckily it doesn't happen in highly trafficked places as much (such as C#, Java, JavaScript, Python, etc.), but it still does happen there. Almost all newly included tag wiki content is taken from official documentation, which is fine, so long as it is documented! There must be credit given when material is copied verbatim, and as a reviewer you are there not to simply usher content along, but to review that content for problems; in this case it means extra work to track down if it exists somewhere else. There are systems that college professors use for this type of work, automatically, so perhaps if someone was actually interested here they could tie into that... but overall this is fairly minor so its probably not worth it. The ban is minor as well.

I think you get that already,

Clearly I need to be even more diligent in reviews, particularly of tag edits.

which is the intention of the minor ban, to just draw some minor attention to the issue.

Would using a search engine to see if some of the exact phrasing appears elsewhere be enough?

This is really all you are expected to do for the most part in tag wiki edits. No one expects an all inclusive search, but at least googling the main content edited in should show if it was directly taken from a vendor site (often the case) or Wikipedia.

How much copied content is too much?

There isn't really a hard fast rule here. Any is too much, without citation, but for the most part about a dozen words or so seems to be where the legal line starts to play a factor.

Is it ever appropriate to "accept and improve" the edit by removing the plagiarized content but keeping the updated links? Would a "reject and edit" (to update the links, after checking that the updates to them are appropriate) be more appropriate? Or should the entire edit be rejected with the plagiarism reason without any subsequent updates to links?

This is all going to be a huge "it depends". There are yes and no scenarios for all of that. If it looks like the person was well intentioned and just slipped up, and you are so inclined, then edit the correct citations in and leave it be; or something in between. Please look at the guide that Stack Overflow authored to deal with proper attribution, How to reference material written by others, if you are going to begin introducing edits that attempt to remedy the plagiarism yourself.

Is there a standard for how long such a ban should be? Is there a more recent meta post that mentions the longer ban?

Not particularly, it really depends on the Moderator's review of your actions, both current and previous. Sometimes they will discuss in chat if it is a more complicated situation. However, the post does state that Moderators must explain the duration:

"They should also provide a short explanation to the user (this is possible when giving a review ban) detailing exactly what they approved, why it's bad, and linking to either this post or the previous one."

Should there be (or is there somewhere) a guide for how to go about checking for plagiarism (hopefully in an efficient way)?

Not entirely, although mostly the answer is "just google the content". I would suggest taking a sentence from the content that looks well written, and googling it in quotes to look for matches; as well, taking a whole paragraph (or a few sentences if the paragraphs are long) and searching it with no quotes to see if it was only slightly modified.

This post is close to a guide: How do I review tag wiki edits for new tags?

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If you grab a few words of the edit and search for them in quotes, you almost always find what it was plagiarized from. For example:

"real-time analytics database designed" in Google results

When nothing comes up, I do another search with a different phrase in quotes. I'm able to determine if something is plagiarism this way in under a minute. If you don't feel comfortable doing this, then you should skip.

While the policy for years has been "review-banning reviewers who approve blatant plagiarism", mods have found that short bans are ineffective because people just don't notice them. That's why longer bans are now being used, with a possibility of it being lifted if you can prove that you've learned your lesson.


For context, I've rejected a bunch of tag wikis for plagiarism, and what feels like 100s of Documentation edits too (see my old suggestion for Documentation). Between the two of them, they seem to almost always be plagiarized. When an edit adds a bunch of unquoted text, you should always view it with skepticism, especially if it sounds like it's made of buzzwords. Look at "slice-and-dice analytics" and "real-time ingestion, fast query performance, and high uptime": definitely not something written by someone who's not trying to sell you on the service.

The existing tag wiki text is also plagiarized, but that's much harder to determine definitively. The text on the page has changed several times since the wiki was created, and it's not clear from a Google search alone which came first: the tag wiki or some other source. (Remember, it's possible that another source plagiarized the tag wiki.) It's only through Archive.org that I can find definite proof that the tag wiki was plagiarized from a source that existed beforehand. And that's why it's important to reject these edits before they are approved and the water gets muddy.

I have no idea what this technology is really about, but I submitted an edit to try to at least have attribution for all the copied content in the wiki (and excerpt), which will hopefully be approved (see excerpt review, wiki review).

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    The review suspension system was substantially updated in 2020-07, which removed the need for moderators to issue long review suspensions in order to communicate the issues they found with the user's reviews. A moderator may sill use a long review suspension, and, perhaps, shorten it if the user demonstrates they've learned and won't repeat similar problem actions, but it's no longer necessary to use a long review suspension in order to communicate. I've updated the answer of mine to which you linked.
    – Makyen Mod
    Dec 24, 2021 at 18:02
  • @Makyen Thoughts on my tag wiki edits (see bottom of my answer)? The excerpt was unanimously rejected one vote for for "vandalism" (how?), the other for not defining the tag (not that the person before me did either — should I have removed the description entirely?). Is there a way for a regular user to fix existing plagiarism like this?
    – Laurel
    Dec 27, 2021 at 3:13
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How much effort looking for plagiarism is expected of a reviewer of a tag wiki edit?

Sufficient effort to spot plagiarism. Generally, copying a sentence or two from the post and pasting that into a Google search will do the job.

Is there a standard for how long such a ban should be?

There is no "standard" as far as I am aware; the length of the suspension will likely depend on a number of factors, such as: how blatant the plagiarism is, the individual's overall review history/quality (including any previous suspensions) and the moderator's mood and/or general nature.

A two week review ban for one incorrect review seems excessive, …

FWIW, I was once review-banned by a moderator (a different one, I guess, as it was before the last election) for the same thing; that was a 7-day penalty. The length may have been reduced because I had already "fessed up" to the crime in a chat-room (SOCVR), expressed my concern that I had missed what was a blatant copy-paste and stated publicly therein that I was expecting a deserved suspension (which came about a day later).

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    Side-note: Google is often the only choice. While answers recommending to search often recommend "your favorite search engine" (either by saying so, or using the genericized term "googling"), this is one of the cases where a google-based search engine (Google and Startpage.com, to name two) outperform the other engines. Mixing often increases coverage for the rare cases where google is useless and another engine isn't, but the vast majority of plagiarism is caught through google searches, because it's not like people even try to hide it. Dec 23, 2021 at 23:42
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    @Zoe What's wrong with Bing? ;) But I have also come across tag Wikis where a link to the website that is the source of the copied text is also included in the edit! (Even if it's the same author, that should still be rejected as "copied content" - because that's what it is.) Dec 23, 2021 at 23:45
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    This case included -- you don't even need to change the text, you can ctrl-c, go to the source website, ctrl-f ctrl-v, and it's an exact match. None of the text was changed to fit into the wiki format (or just to make it harder to find), because people (for reasons that I'm not going to discuss because it's an entire discussion on its own) seem to think copying content for wikis is fine. Ecosia (Bing-based), DDG, and Google (+ Startpage) all list the source for this particular edit as their top result, so it's not exactly hard to find Dec 23, 2021 at 23:46
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    I'm not sure what the problem with Bing, Yahoo, and DDG is. Maybe they have a smaller database? In either case, they often don't find as much as Google does. And I'm not saying this because I'm a fan of Google; I'm not, and I prefer Ecosia myself, which is bing-based. It's not really because it's bing-based, though, but I digress. Google is just better at these things, for reasons I assume only the algorithm developers could start to guess the answer to Dec 23, 2021 at 23:49
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    And yeah, some tag wiki edits even include links to where it's plagiarized from. Checking included links for a possible source of text is actually a really viable strategy. Dec 23, 2021 at 23:50
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    "moderator's mood" - is that really a factor? That sounds rather unjust.
    – richardec
    Dec 24, 2021 at 2:40
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    @richardec I doubt that it's a major factor. I was just trying to offer an indication that moderators aren't robots and can act differently - from each other and from time to time. Dec 24, 2021 at 3:45
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Probably there should be, but who reads rules in advance.

I've got half a year ban for the same -- this review https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/29940871.

Sure after the ban I found meta discussions about wiki plagiarism you linked, and sure next time I'll just skip those tag wiki edits.

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    "I've got half a year ban for the same" -- I think you'll find your current review ban also contains two failed audits. You also don't have what I'd classify as an exceptional review history. Going by history alone, your current ban would've been 2^8, or 256, days, at the typical doubling, and possibly a year. At slightly under 100 days less, you got off easy here. You're also explicitly informed about the tag wiki plagiarism check requirements when you get the privilege. Not knowing the rules doesn't free you of the responsibility they require. Dec 24, 2021 at 15:30
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    In fact, your ban was automatically started by the failed audits, and extended (manually) when plagiarism came into play Dec 24, 2021 at 15:31
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    stackoverflow.com/help/privileges/approve-tag-wiki-edits -- Alright. it is there. Perhaps an answer to OP's question either. Dec 24, 2021 at 15:37
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    "Probably there should be, but who reads rules in advance." hahahaha!!!!! +1 for the succinct transparent honesty. :-)
    – T-Heron
    Dec 26, 2021 at 15:13

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