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I want to ask a question, but it has already been asked. That would make my question duplicated.

Editing the question would need to remove particular details (which are not relevant to the actual question and misled responses) and add some context.

What should be done in this case?

Note that there is no answer. An example: the author asks in the title how to do X but then exposes problem Y, which would require solution X. But Y could also be solved by other means. I want to ask how to do X, providing more details about the X problem, along with a bit of research. I don't want any mention of Y.

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  • 6
    If the question is already asked, and the answer is there, why do you want to ask it again? It doesn't matter if the question is poorly worded if it's a duplicate, it's still a duplicate and the answer may well be well written. If you want to improve the readability of the question, such as fixing grammar, spelling, formatting, removing noise, then submit an edit for it.
    – Larnu
    Nov 25 at 21:41
  • 2
    So what's wrong with editing it?
    – Dharman
    Nov 25 at 21:48
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    You only mention the poorly written question. What about the answer(s) if any? Do they exist, are they helpful or confusing? What exactly is your motivation for asking again?
    – charlietfl
    Nov 25 at 21:49
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    There is no answer. And the main problem is that as the autor adds some details, it might end up getting an answer that solves the problem but it is not the actual solution to the question.
    – Josu Goñi
    Nov 25 at 21:49
  • 2
    If the existing question is unanswered what leads you to think that your version wouldn't suffer the same fate? Nov 25 at 21:50
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    If the question you have found would end up with answers that don't answer your question, then you aren't asking the same question...
    – Larnu
    Nov 25 at 21:59
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    @RobertLongson I think that by removing specific details and adding a bit of research on the question, more people might be inclined to either upvote it or find a solution. I have edited the question.
    – Josu Goñi
    Nov 25 at 22:02
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    FYI in order for a question to be closed as a duplicate, the canonical post must have accepted or upvoted answers
    – Phil
    Nov 25 at 22:25
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    If you can write a good question, and based on your history you probably can, write the question. No one's going to close it as a duplicate of an unanswered, poorly asked question. Well, no one who's not a jerk. Nov 25 at 22:25
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    unanswered question can't be used as a duplicate target
    – Juraj
    Nov 26 at 9:29
  • 1
    Maybe vote to close the original question, if it isn't answerable due to lack of focus. Nov 28 at 11:34
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Asking is cheap. I think you should not hold yourself too much, and just do the obvious. Want to get answers? - ask your question.

If the other question asks the same and is unclear, the right thing is to mark it as a duplicate of yours, the clearer one. However, if the two questions are different, both will serve a purpose. You can know that for sure only when you get answers.

The community will sort it out. The worst you can get - your question gets closed, or sits there indefinitely without answers. The best you can get - your question gets answered, and you don't care about the other question.

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    "I think you should not hold yourself too much", I agree with this, but SO is a very strict community when it comes to duplication, poor quality or lack of research effort, that is why OP is being so careful about this. Meta is a good place to rid yourself of the insecurities of maybe making a mistake in the SE network. Is this healthy? That is another question altogether.
    – Matheus R
    Nov 26 at 17:52
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    "If the other question ... is unclear" close it as unclear! Do not close it as duplicate. Unclear questions can't be duplicates because it's unclear what they are asking.
    – Braiam
    Nov 26 at 19:59
  • This is terrible advice. Why is it so highly upvoted? Why are we encouraging askers to create dupes and extra work for curators?
    – Ian Kemp
    2 days ago
  • Agreed, this goes against SO's sentiment. This will likely mostly result in post being closed and people thinking SO is toxic.
    – Nearoo
    2 days ago
  • I support this answer, but only because a comment on the question states that there is no existing answer yet so we are not talking about the sort of duplication which you can actually close vote just yet. A poor unanswered question should not hold you back from asking a better question which hopefully will get answered. This is assuming there is not a third question in play which IS answered, of course...
    – Gimby
    2 days ago
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The correct way of moderating duplicate questions is not to use the oldest post as dupe target but the highest quality post. So if you believe that you could ask a better question and/or receive better answers than an already asked question, go ahead. In particular, if the other question has not received an answer, it should not be used as a duplicate target.

You might want to add a comment inside/below the question along the lines of "I already saw this question <link> but it's not great because <reasons>" to show that you have already made some research effort.

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    If the question has not received an (upvoted or accepted) answer then it can not be used as a dupe target, unless both questions have the same asker. Nov 26 at 15:11
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    Definitely link the existing question when you ask. There's no better defense against a bad dup flag than "I already thought of this and here's why it's not a dup". Nov 27 at 20:10
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    Just curious – what's your evidence or reasoning for using the "highest quality" post as the "dupe target"? Maybe I just assumed for no good reason, but I've always thought the correct, or maybe 'just obvious', dupe target is the oldest question. 2 days ago
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    @KennyEvitt You need domain expertise about the topic and some experience of what makes a good question on SO. Unfortunately a lot of people pick the oldest one so a whole lot of our "canonical" duplicates are actually quite bad posts, in particularly incomplete answers where the complete answer is scattered across several. Or some of it is outdated. Then the whole thing gets ridiculously upvoted over time.
    – Lundin
    2 days ago
  • @Lundin I agree that 'highest quality' is a better metric for picking a 'canonical' question, but this seems like your personal policy instead of something that's been more widely agreed upon. I asked this followup about this just now. 2 days ago
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I would think the best thing to do would be to edit the question.

You claim that the original question includes details but they're NOT relevant to the "actual question" AND that those details "misled responses" (comments?). Those facts seem like great reasons to remove those details.

Or, instead of removing those details, include them – but also provide the context needed to explain why they're NOT relevant. That might be very helpful to other visitors to the question!

It also seems like you want to 'split' the original question. If that's reasonable, then I think it's fine to go ahead and ask your own "X" question. Do link to the original question, but explain why you think it 'really' covers separate "X" and "Y" questions, and be explicit about only wanting an answer to the "X" question in your own new question.

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