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I asked a question I thought was very good quality, and it received two downvotes and two close votes without any explanation.

I have answered/asked/voted a lot, and this recent interaction was discouraging. If someone could at least explain what is wrong with, for example, my question, that would be nice so I could correct it. But I am very discouraged by what the meta seems to currently be.

Why is asking a good-quality but difficult-to-answer question so hard to do without getting closed/downvoted?

Edit: The duplicates listed on this question are from over 7 years ago. I feel like SO would have changed a lot, especially as a lot of the very general questions have been asked/answered, and new technologies/less general questions are more prevalent.

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    Stuff like this makes me want to stay as a moderator kinda :/ I wish I could help.
    – BoltClock
    Nov 24 at 15:08
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    I don't know what is wrong with your question. I see no reason why it was closed. The reason says that it lacks MCVE, but it looks to have one.
    – Dharman
    Nov 24 at 15:09
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    Asking questions on SO becomes difficult each day because the easy topics have already been covered. Asking a question now is not an easy feat. You must find an interesting topic and clearly explain what you want to achieve. I would say your question looks on-topic, but it might be a duplicate.
    – Dharman
    Nov 24 at 15:12
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    Notice that in recent history SO is downvoting less questions in proportion with the amount of questions asked. Note how the number of downvotes is constant while upvotes grows.
    – Braiam
    Nov 24 at 15:16
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    One could certainly argue your question is lacking debugging information, but, that's effectively your question, you have a problem, and you've debugged it, and none of your debugging attempts have resulted in actionable results. I do expect it to be difficult to find an answer to your question, but this isn't the kind of low quality/poorly asked question we should be going after.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 15:19
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    I agree that the referenced question is definitely not "lacking debugging details" (you provided a minimal code sample which, in theory, is sufficient to reproduce the problem), and I also don't have an obvious duplicate at hand (apart from the async/Task.Run/CancellationToken problems maybe). Not sure whether this one bad closure is suited to make a case against closure/downvote behavior in general, though.
    – janw
    Nov 24 at 15:23
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    Ah yes the "ego-centrism" and "questions are hard to answer" arguments for why questions are getting closed. Haven't heard that for quite some time. Usually from users who are clueless about SO and how it works, but that it is coming from two 29k rep users is actually funny.
    – Tom
    Nov 24 at 18:45
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    "I dont understand teh reasoning, so it must be because they dn't understand the question"
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 18:47
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    "Why is asking a good-quality but difficult-to-answer question so hard to do without getting closed/downvoted?" Is this only based on your experience with that one question (which has been reopened and currently a score of 4)? There are mechanisms in place to rectify possibly incorrect actions, and if a post is good and useful, it will eventually receive upvotes from other users it helped. Seems like they worked, so what is the problem? The only surefire way to prevent erroneous actions is to make such actions impossible. I doubt that would actually be helpful, though. Nov 24 at 18:57
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    or... maybe your view of what is and isn't on topic/useful/quality doesn't match that of the users who are willing to use the tools made available to them. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ That your opinion differs... doesn't mean theirs is wrong.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 19:10
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    One thing you could do (not that you are alone in this) is change the default text added when inserting images from "enter image description here" to, well, a description of the image, or nothing if it is adequately described elsewhere in the text. I doubt that's why you were downvoted, but who knows? Maybe some particularly zealous accessibility boosters saw the question? We can't possibly know why people vote the way they do. Nov 24 at 20:33
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    @Tom when a bad question is closed, I'm right with you. But on the rare occasions when a good question is closed, we should be asking the hard question of, "Why? How did a good question fall through the cracks?" Nov 24 at 22:44
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    @user4581301 eh, so, you only agree with that notion when you agree with the closure, that's... well, not really useful. Agreeing that a given case is a good closure or a bad closure doesn't help resolve the issue of why did 3 people think it was bad? or why do you think it's good? In the end, the best way forward is to simply treat all of the situations the same; use the tools available to you. Don't assume the people you disagree with are just angry people making bad decisions.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 22:50
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    @cigien: It really wasn't an answer to begin with. The question really was about why the OP's question was closed and shouldn't have been a vent session or a "what about the olden days" kind of question. But even if it wasn't, I'm still struggling to see how it answered the original form of the question to begin with. It doesn't illustrate why asking good questions is so hard these days as the answer just rambles about the day when they could post homework questions here, or act as a cautionary tale to those who just seek "handouts" as they put it.
    – Makoto
    Nov 25 at 1:39
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This question doesn't have any of the typical hallmarks of a question we get nowadays on Stack Overflow - one where the answer could be found in duplicates and is readily obvious to any average passer-by that these answers are useful and or good.

In this case, though, I don't see anything in the question that leads me to believe that the question itself is bad or that there was any reason to close it down or close it as a duplicate. So you're fine. No need to sweat it in this case since the Meta Effect has done Its Job™.

I also confess that I'm no expert in C# and am thus as useful as a rubber duck when it comes to the actual question, so I wouldn't really know how to rectify the situation of if this was a duplicate or not.

Not going to suggest anything against anyone specific, but I've said it time and again on Meta that something needs to be done about people who are a lot more close happy than is reasonable.

21

A link in the comments already explains why comments on downvotes are not required.

That being said, I'm also slightly baffled by the downvotes and close votes on the linked question, as it seems to be high-quality to me. It seems like the reviewers just got it wrong in this instance.

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    I guess I'm looking for guidance on how to ask a question now, as I do see a lot of questions (at least in c#) get closed very fast. Or is SO not the place for specific/focused questions?
    – davidsbro
    Nov 24 at 19:57
  • SO is for questions that fall in line with the topics and guidelines that govern questions on SO.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 20:10
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    Right. So when a question does fall in line, and still gets closed, then what?
    – davidsbro
    Nov 24 at 20:15
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    Then you use the tools at your disposal. Edit the question, cast a reopen vote, open a specific-question post on meta, etc.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 20:21
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    I was not aware of specific question on meta. It didn’t used to be a thing I don’t think
    – davidsbro
    Nov 25 at 3:40
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    There was a time when the SO community highly encouraged leaving a comment when downvoting, especially on questions where OP put in a decent amount of effort. It's destructive and lame not to. I don't understand why the community turned to the opposite.
    – Daniel W.
    Nov 25 at 16:40
  • @DanielW. I personally like to include some explanation for my downvotes so that the OP can improve the post, but an explanation isn't required for the reasons outlined in the FAQ. In this case, I disagree with the downvotes though because I think that the question is high quality (which is why I voted the other way). Nov 25 at 18:50
  • @DanielW.: "I don't understand why the community turned to the opposite." Because, more often than not, it leads to arguments. It's easier to avoid social interaction and move on. Nov 25 at 23:05
  • @DanielW - I stopped leaving a comment when the the user’s who were submitting low quality questions turned around and serially downvoted my contributions were on another community where they had enough reputation to do so. So now my only feedback is the close reason that often follows a downvote. If that’s not enough then SE should probably provide some additional features to provide more detailed feedback that protects the community users from revenge downvotes Nov 26 at 5:22
  • @SecurityHound serial downvoting is often detected and automatically reversed, no? Nov 26 at 15:38
  • @TankorSmash - Often this behavior was detected unless they knew about the serial voting reversal, then they would vote below the threshold, I reported the behavior but nothing was ever done about it (which is when I decided the close reason was enough feedback). Nov 26 at 15:44
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Regarding the close votes, the question has been reopened so I can no longer see the dupe-target it was closed as, but:

The question is about C# yet entirely fails to provide any information about what version of the .NET runtime is being used. That's an important detail; when it comes to debugging complex issues like this, it's a critical detail. Without the runtime version, I don't know which source code to look at to potentially help you (yes, the .NET source code is mostly available; your claim that "Due to the nature of not being able to see why the Ping is hanging" is completely false).

That, for me, is an automatic "needs details or clarity" close vote. Sorry, but regardless of how well-written your question is, if you fail to provide the most basic information, I have better things to do with my time than type comments in an effort to try to squeeze blood (information) out of a stone (you). The onus is on you as the asker to make your question answerable, not anyone else.


Regarding the downvotes:

While the question it may be well-described, at the end of the day it is describing an issue that has significant complexity, and thus requires significant investment from a potential answerer. Especially when you state "after hours (or days) of running" and "Most of the time all the tasks finish and are disposed; it is just randomly that they don't finish", it starts to sound like this is an environment- or configuration-specific issue that quite possibly can't be replicated by anyone else.

Effectively, you're asking for debugging by proxy, and that ain't how Stack Overflow works; this type of question would likely be much better suited to a forum post or GitHub discussion or reddit thread.

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    > I have better things to do with my time And closing/downvoting prevents other people which might have the time, and want to help, from contributing Nov 25 at 9:37
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    @BenWilliams Downvoting prevents nothing. Closed questions can always be voted to be reopened.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 25 at 9:42
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    I tried reading the question, and just wow... it may be a real issue, but I bet if the poster comes back in a few months and re-reads it they'll vote to close it too. It sounds like rubber-ducking. There may be a solution, but there is no direct question.
    – Andrew
    Nov 25 at 9:49
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    Downvoted questions are less likely to be seen, and not everyone has the rep to vote to reopen. Nov 25 at 9:50
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    @BenWilliams The author can always edit the question to fix the problems, which will push it into the review queue for reopening.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 25 at 10:04
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    @Andrew That's a good way of putting it - there's definitely a question, namely "how do I make this thing that's misbehaving not misbehave", but that's certainly not direct or easily answerable.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 25 at 10:05
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    You're probably right, a question asked with the best of intentions and dotting all the i's which makes it so looks are deceiving, but at the end of the day Stack Overflow is still the wrong tool for this particular job. Still, I see no particular harm in the question being attempted even if it is a bit of a crapshoot that someone might actually have seen the exact scenario before and thus does not need to go into a ridiculous problem replication session.
    – Gimby
    Nov 25 at 14:23
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    Seriously, close vote on a potentially good question because you're too impatient to use a comment for its purpose: "use comments to ask for clarification or add more information" <= which is exactly what the comment popup hint says? And the only clarification you want is which .NET runtime? If you have better things to do with your time then go do them, what's stopping you? Instead OP has to use the meta-effect to get it reopened; what about our time? This question can be answered by a person who's run into the situation before and those kinds of answers do occur here on SO.
    – davidbak
    Nov 25 at 14:30
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    @Gimby To be clear, I don't have a problem with the question as it stands (apart from the lack of .NET Runtime info), I just think it's likely to degenerate into a "have you tried X" comment chain (which has already happened) and that's not how the site is intended to work. Agree that the asker might get lucky via "I've seen this before", but if not likely the only way that question ever gets answered is via self-answer.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 25 at 14:30
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    @davidbak Did you completely ignore the last sentence of my answer?
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 25 at 14:31
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    So the comment popup tag is wrong? You don't use comments to ask for clarification? The questioner has to get it right the first time or mind-read the downvoters or he's screwed?
    – davidbak
    Nov 25 at 14:32
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    BTW: I myself have answered questions right here on SO because I happened to have run into the situation myself. And those answers have subsequently gotten upvotes from people who said, in comments "came here on a search, this worked."
    – davidbak
    Nov 25 at 14:36
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    A lot of questions one could ask about a snippet of C# code don't depend to any significant extent on the runtime used. While comments on downvotes aren't required, comments on close votes are an important courtesy, especially if it's a "needs debugging details" vote. OP commonly doesn't know what information is needed; if it were obvious, then OP presumably would have gotten further with the process of fixing the problem independently. If you think the runtime is important, you should say so, and explain why. Nov 25 at 16:21
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    "I have better things to do with my time than type comments" I find this to be an exceedingly obnoxious and arrogant attitude. The asker puts in a lot of effort to debug the problem, then to research the problem, then a lot of time to write out a detailed question, and you come along and say "Sorry, you didn't provide this one tiny detail that isn't obviously important and I'm not even going to waste my time telling you what's missing" and close-vote. The pervasive notion that question-askers must bow and scrape to the almighty answer gods is utterly revolting and I reject it completely.
    – Clonkex
    Nov 25 at 23:21
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    I appreciate your feedback. I added details about the .net version as well as that the issue occurs on different OS’s across different networks and hosts, even with a barebones project. So I don’t think it’s a local or config issue. I thoroughly made sure it wasn’t before asking. I should’ve made that clearer
    – davidsbro
    Nov 26 at 2:43
7

I think you have actually come to meta for two reasons:

  1. You wonder why the question has received negative feedback. I honestly have no idea why. You describe a difficult problem that hasn't been asked before with a good explanation and code to demonstrate it. You were around to answer questions in the comments. In all, your question is "better" (at least: more attractive to me) than the vast majority.

  2. You feel bad about the negative reaction: "I have answered/asked/voted a lot, and this recent interaction was discouraging." To this my answer would be: Pay attention to downvotes or closing requests only by checking your answer. The downvoters and closers may have a point. In your case you could not see anything wrong; that is all there is to downvotes and closing votes. Apparently you disagree with some people; that happens.

If your good question is closed, flag it for mod attention. I'd be surprised if it didn't get reopened very quickly. Apparently it was. Then stop fretting about it — there is no benefit to wonder about the motives of people beyond the subject matter ("do they perhaps have a point?"), which you checked. Everything else is wasted time and emotion. The closing voters don't mean it personally.

For example, I see that πάντα ῥεῖ has voted to close. πάντα ῥεῖ is an experienced C++ expert user who, like most experts, must be assumed to be increasingly annoyed by the growing number of low-quality questions. Consequently, πάντα goes and regularly weeds out bad questions, something I appreciate and support. Bad question authors are wasting precious time and disk space, and they show a lack of respect: They don't have enough respect to read the tour, google their keywords and check their speling.

Because your question was in my opinion of good quality, I'd chalk πάντα's close vote up as collateral damage during a cleaning spree. Nothing to despair about.

-13

This answer was written before the question was edited to make it a different question. The original question asked why Stack Overflow has become very daunting for people asking questions.

It’s hard to ask questions because people with question are the least important kind of users of Stack Overflow.

There are several different users of this site. There are readers who come here from Google to read the answer to an existing question. There are important to Stack Overflow because the read and click on adds. Rank in search engines is important, and therefore the company wants to control both the quantity and perceived quality of question so that they achieve high search rank on Google. The also helps encourage people to come directly here and search for answers.

There are people who answer questions. The are obviously important to Stack Overflow, because they generate free content and also rate others' content for free. By free, I mean not for money. These people do get non-finical rewards such as points in the game or reputation as an expert in some topic. The company does work hard to encourage these people. A lot of the motivation to close questions to make sure the questions which stay open appeal to people who answer a lot of questions. People who moderate the site are a lot like people to answer questions.

Finally, there are people who ask questions. Since they are many times more people who ask questions than people who answer questions the company doesn’t need to encourage them. Answering questions is not as important as controlling the quantity and quality of the questions. The company creates tools to make it easy to remove questions which are perceived as low quality. A shared belief in what is a good question is strong here. The company uses quality tools to train people to think alike as to what a good question is. People who question what should be closed are quickly downvoted on Meta.

The company knows that people who ask questions often have a bad experience, and they pay lip service to improving their experience (like the wavy hand). However, the company over the years has done more and more to encourage people to close other people’s questions.

Like you, I came back to Stack Overflow after taking a break because I didn’t like how people who ask questions are treated. I don’t see things changing because Stack Overflow is not about asking questions; it’s about generating content.

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    There's just a lot of... assumptions that have been proven wrong by the actions the company has taken. For example, right out of the gate, the user that the SO team spends the most time on are the ones asking questions. 9 out of 10 new features added in the past 4-5 years have been to make things easier on new users. New user engagement is incredibly important to a functioning community like SO.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 23:06
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    I am one of the people who "the company does work hard to encourage" (hint - take a look at my user profile) - if you find the results of that incredibly hard work to reward me and others like me, please let us know, I definitely missed something. And the motivation to close questions - I wonder what would that be? There is literally zero motivation to do so (the only one [closing to promote one's post] is rightfully considered abuse), and in the case of duplicate closure, actively discouraging (try finding the dupe target if you did not have a bookmark already). Sigh. Nov 24 at 23:14
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    They even doubled the rep you get per upvote on questions iirc
    – Kevin B
    Nov 24 at 23:15
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    @KevinB and did so retroactively, I might add... Nov 24 at 23:15
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    Re "the company over the years has done more and more to encourage people to close other people’s questions.": No, they haven't. Nov 26 at 1:30

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