23

Typing the Enter/Return key using Python and Selenium is specifically about Selenium in Python, but highly upvoted answers provide answers for Selenium in at least four different programming languages.

In this context, is it appropriate to broaden the question to multiple programming languages?

What triggered my question is that a new answer in the low-quality-answer queue attempts to improve on the existing answers for Java (I believe). Since this Q&A has probably become the de facto reference for hitting the Enter key with Selenium in any programming language, it is legitimate for new contributors to want to provide better answers or improve on existing ones, but given the question as it stands, it is also legitimate for reviewers to delete such new answers as not-an-answer. And indeed, that new answer has three "Recommend deletion" LQA reviews at the moment.

10
  • 1
  • 1
    I'm of the camp that these other answers should not be deleted, as they bring clear value for others, but I know that isn't everyone's stance. In the general case, I don't think widening the question's stance is a great idea most of the time, but if this question has already solicited many non-python answers, then this might be a good exception to make.
    – zcoop98
    Nov 12 '21 at 16:30
  • 1
    @zcoop98 Thanks for that link. It specifically addresses Selenium, I suppose not by coincidence, and it seems to imply my suggested broadening would be appropriate. Although maybe only in specific cases like this one.
    – joanis
    Nov 12 '21 at 16:30
  • Non-language-specific questions aren't even received well by the community. You surely can't broaden it to "How to do ___ in ___ languages?" You can't really broaden the question more, can you? There should be different questions for different languages, almost duplicates but not quite. Nov 12 '21 at 16:47
  • 2
    …it is also legitimate for reviewers to delete such new answers as not-an-answer. Is it though? They are still attempts to answer. As for the question, I don’t think an edit that changes the intent of the author is a good idea, regardless of what answers people write. From zcoop98’s link, it seems like this is normal for this tag anyway.
    – BSMP
    Nov 12 '21 at 17:03
  • 2
    Thank you for the responses. I'm not surprised there isn't consensus, it wasn't a straightforward question. I'll let it stand - I don't want to make a change like this without consensus.
    – joanis
    Nov 12 '21 at 23:02
  • 1
  • 4
    Only the OP should broaden it.
    – PCM
    Nov 13 '21 at 3:14
  • 4
    I had not looked at the edit history the way Oleg did and so did not realize that there was already an edit that changed the intent of the question. I would agree with restoring the original intent since the justification for that edit is a meta discussion saying adding tags to the title is unnecessary.
    – BSMP
    Nov 13 '21 at 5:17
  • @PCM I agree. The SO documentation for reviewing suggested edits states "Edits should maintain the post author’s original intent". Some previous (invalid) edits made to the linked question happened to produce answers that were useful to some, but they were not answers to the question that the author had asked. See Oleg's answer below. The genie is out of the bottle once we sanction amending the "post author’s original intent" just because there are some helpful answers which don't address the question but meet our personal approval.
    – skomisa
    Nov 14 '21 at 3:07
32

Actually, the confusing situation you got into might be a result of improper edits made to the post over the years. Consider the initial revision of the post from 2009 (which, with some refining edits, stayed mostly the same till late 2019), tagged only with :

Typing enter/return key in selenium

Looking for a quick way to type an enter or return key in Selenium. Unfortunately the form I'm trying to test (not my own code so I can't modify) doesn't have a submit button. When working with it manually, I just type enter or return, and just need to know how to do that with the Selenium "type" command.

Not language-specific, isn't it? The first time we ever hear of the question being language-specific is December 2019 where a user inserted "in Python" into the title in the 8th revision of the question. After that, an unsuspecting user added the tag in revision 10 (likely basing their decision on the "in Python" title).

Let's list the answers that mention languages other than Python in historical order, shall we?

I will let the community at large decide whether an edit invalidating 10 positively-scored (at the time of this writing) answers and a decade of history was justified, but I have to humbly remind that revision 8 violates one of the editing guidelines on Stack Overflow:

Avoid putting tags in the question title

As well as the golden rule reiterated multiple times: do not invalidate answers with edits.

8
  • 9
    The comment of that title edit even references that guideline. That comment is usually made when removing tags from the title, not adding it. It's odd.
    – gre_gor
    Nov 13 '21 at 6:51
  • What was the reason for the 8th revision? @jww Nov 13 '21 at 16:43
  • 7
    Wow, thanks for unearthing the history, I should have though of looking there! I am happy to see @DonaldDuck undid the 8th and 10th revisions. The question is much better again as it stands, and respects OP's original intent.
    – joanis
    Nov 13 '21 at 18:35
  • 5
    Sadly, the new answer I was reviewing, which prompted all this, got deleted anyway. It was just a one-liner without explanation, but different enough from other answers in the same language that it might still have added some value. Oh well, it's a very well answered question anyway, so probably nothing lost.
    – joanis
    Nov 13 '21 at 18:37
  • 1
    "the golden rule reiterated multiple times: do not invalidate answers with edits" - this is mainly a golden rule when it comes to changing the original intent of the author (which seems to clearly be the case here) and ideally when the original question is on-topic (which may or may not be the case here, although closing it and asking a new question may make more sense if it's not on-topic). Editing the question to reflect the intent of the author can be fine even if it invalidates answers (although that doesn't mean it's always fine, it would be a bit more subjective). Nov 13 '21 at 18:42
  • 2
    @joanis yeah, I wasn't even expecting to write an answer at first, but the bizarreness of the situation prompted me to look into the revision history :) That is an interesting case of someone unilaterally deciding that the question is about Python now when it never was supposed to be. Nov 14 '21 at 1:49
  • 1
    @BernhardBarker definitely, that's why I called it a golden rule, not a hard rule. I agree that it is not always applicable in the sense that it is absolutely ok to edit the post in shape if author's intent or answers completely miss the mark of either being on-topic or following the existing guidelines themselves. Methinks this old Q&A edit wasn't made in spirit of making the question more focused, though, and was rather an arbitrary edit ( as I would expect the culling/editing of other answers to happen in the process, for example ) Nov 14 '21 at 2:02
  • Now the question is answered if that post should be reverted to it's original state what is a very specific scope. But OP has asked if it's ok in general. So when it is appropriate to broaden a question if the answers are broader than what you have asked originally? Nov 14 '21 at 18:25
18

Looking at the history, you would not be broadening the question if you removed python from the subject as well as the python tag, instead you would be returning it to its original state.

None of the changes to this question were made by the OP, not even as comments as far as I can tell. It looks like a someone just made it up out of thin air years after the question and most of the answers were posted.

IMO those changes should be reverted.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .