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I happened to look at and it says (quoting from somewhere):

record transactions between two parties efficiently

The chains for Bitcoin and Ethereum are anything but efficient in terms of fees, processing power or Transactions Per Second and there is as yet no major chain to the best of my knowledge that implements Proof of Stake. I think that subjective word should be dropped (replacing with "inefficiently" would be too subjective the other way!), but I thought I'd see what the consensus is rather than efficiently burninating that adverb off my own bat.

BTW, Merriam-Webster also has the same quote:

The technology at the heart of bitcoin and other virtual currencies, blockchain is an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way.
— Marco Iansiti and Karim R. Lakhani

I suppose it might be an efficient solution to the Byzantine Generals problem, but...

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  • 2
    "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way" is a quote from here
    – VLAZ
    Nov 11, 2021 at 6:13
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    Also, for reference the whole tag wiki is copy-pasted from this older revision of Wikipedia. The latest version of the article does not use that quote in its body.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 11, 2021 at 6:20
  • 76
    The word "efficiently", even if it were factually correct, would still be completely unnecessary for the purpose of describing what questions the tag should be used for.
    – kaya3
    Nov 11, 2021 at 8:20
  • 4
    I don't know enough about blockchains to say whether this is the case or not, but please bear in mind that the word "efficient" may have a precisely-defined technical meaning in this context, and blockchains may satisfy this technical definition. For example, in the context of algorithmic complexity, there is the notion of "step-efficiency" which means that a parallel variant of an algorithm, even with the added work of splitting the work and merging the result, has the same step complexity as the equivalent serial algorithm. It could be a horribly inefficient algorithm in terms of its step … Nov 11, 2021 at 8:38
  • 3
    … complexity in general, but as long as it is equally inefficient as the corresponding serial algorithm, it is still step-efficient. For example, parallel bubble sort can be made step-efficient, I believe. It is still an inefficient sorting algorithm, but it is no more inefficient than serial bubble sort, and thus step-efficient. Nov 11, 2021 at 8:38
  • 3
    And out of technical contexts, “efficient” implies a judgment call on how you count cost and benefits. Therefore arguing it is not makes the same mistake you point out. Thus I would say your point is valid, but not the way you defend it.
    – spectras
    Nov 11, 2021 at 8:40
  • 2
    there is nothing efficient about blockchain (at the moment). Not it's energy use (for POW based chains) nor it's speed (for any chain).
    – Joel
    Nov 11, 2021 at 9:29
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    Also, blockchain is not the same as cryptocurrency. I'd say that blockchain is pretty "efficient", it's just a transaction ledger, but crypto like Bitcoin is a climate crime.
    – DavidG
    Nov 11, 2021 at 9:48
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    I think it's misleading. The only way a blockchain is the most efficient method is if you have the requirement that you cannot possibly rely on a centralized entity. Once you remove this requirement, recording transactions using traditional methods (like a SQL database) is far more efficient (both from a user and developer standpoint).
    – oscfri
    Nov 11, 2021 at 10:18
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    Why does this matter? Blockchain is nothing but overhyped BS regardless of what people claim about its possible applications. If people want to cram nonsensical marketing buzzwords into its tag description, good for them. The rest of us will continue ignoring the tag and technology while we continue building actual software for the real world.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 12, 2021 at 7:53
  • @IanKemp Are you confusing blockchain and crypto?
    – DavidG
    Nov 12, 2021 at 9:46
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    @DavidG No. Blockchain has not proven itself useful for solving any problem, besides inventing cryptocurrency which in and of itself is a problem.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 12, 2021 at 9:56
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    a git repo is a blockchain
    – user253751
    Nov 12, 2021 at 11:24
  • 2
    @user253751 You are wrong.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 12, 2021 at 13:54
  • 2
    @DavidG I'd honestly be interested in hearing about those. Got any links to repos or blogs?
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 12, 2021 at 13:56

4 Answers 4

12

Given the upvotes on all the answers suggesting removal (e.g. +50 -0 on reducing activity's), and lack of any serious opposition to the idea, I've edited the tag wiki to remove that word, since I have the rep to make tag-wiki edits without bothering reviewers. https://stackoverflow.com/posts/23846991/revisions.

TODO while we're looking at it:

  • More guidance on tag usage (what kinds of blockchain questions are on-topic) and on related tags.
  • Probably just link wikipedia for a definition of what it is.
  • Maybe add other links for useful libraries with implementations of it, and/or articles about developing / working with and debugging block chains.

I've never interacted with the blockchain tag on SO, or worked with blockchain software, so I didn't attempt to do more with my edit. (And no, git is not a "blockchain" in the sense meant here. Merkle trees long predate the modern distributed-ledger meaning. And BTW, the Q&A explaining that is the highest-voted question in the tag :P)

I do know enough about what it is and how the proof-of-work operates to know that it's not efficient in most senses of the word for use-cases that need to resist hostile blocks, e.g. compared to just centralizing trust in a single ledger (database).

Whether there's some technical sense in which "efficient" is meaningful isn't really relevant to whether it belongs in a tag wiki, or in a paragraph that's mostly describing it qualitatively as an introduction. Discussion along those lines in comments hasn't led to anyone arguing that we should keep the word "efficient" in the tag wiki based on it, just that it might not be technically incorrect and the intent of whoever wrote it might not have been purely marketing fluff. Again, that doesn't mean it belongs in the tag wiki, and I think everyone's in agreement on that.

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60

"efficiently" is not needed here at best.

Practically it is a marketing buzzword fluff and should be removed.

When it is efficient and not heavily depends on situation. For vast majority of transactions, storing value, confirmation, distribution, recording information and other purposes blockchain is extremely inefficient. While being efficient in some very specific cases, especially where there is no entity that can be trusted.

When it is efficient and when not deserves extensive description, far longer than paragraph above. Which is already too long to put into summary like this one.

And anyway

The word "efficiently", even if it were factually correct, would still be completely unnecessary for the purpose of describing what questions the tag should be used for.

-- kaya3


Also, right now it appears to describe cryptocurrencies - not blockchains, though "transactions" can be interpreted here as database transactions.

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  • 21
    +1 for "marketing buzzword fluff". I don't like weasel words in tag description.
    – CodeCaster
    Nov 11, 2021 at 16:07
  • Sadly until operation Star Goat gets off the ground we're stuck with marketing. Nov 13, 2021 at 0:25
  • I've edited the tag wiki to remove that word. stackoverflow.com/posts/23846991/revisions. TODO while we're looking at it: more guidance on tag usage (what kinds of blockchain questions are on-topic) and on related tags. And probably just link wikipedia for a definition of what it is. (And maybe other links for useful libraries with implementations of it, and/or articles about developing / working with and debugging block chains.) Nov 13, 2021 at 6:30
18

The tag description is horrible marketing-speak - just tap edit and change it.

No need for a meta discussion to change a tag description.

(It is a common problem on the site that tag descriptions are either (a) just very bad or (b) copied from some marketing slab of text and very bad. This often happens for example on the software sites, where people paste in the marketing idiocy for some technology or other. I constantly just edit and change such tags.)

Say the tag was for the "most noble" cause in the world, it's a tag for a children's charity. In the tag you wouldn't describe it as a "worthy" charity or a "heartfelt" charity or a "uplifting" charity, it's just a charity.

Just tap edit and change it. If, incredibly, someone wants to change it back or it sparks a debate, it might then be mentioned on meta.

It is a blatanatly risible tag description, tap edit and fix.

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    Thank you for this sensible, and only correct, answer. Of all the problems that Stack Overflow faces, someone decided to make a Meta post about this non-problem... the mind boggles.
    – Ian Kemp
    Nov 12, 2021 at 13:57
  • 2
    Perhaps if it was just changed, it would be changed back, and a meta post would be needed anyway.
    – user253751
    Nov 12, 2021 at 14:05
  • 6
    @user253751 - not really, no. The well-established, completely commonplace, procedure on all SE sites is that, if a tag needs editing you just edit it. (In the very rare case, it has happened maybe "once" that a discussion arises - whatever.) You simply don't start a meta about editing a tag, you just edit it as you see fit.
    – Fattie
    Nov 12, 2021 at 17:51
  • @user253751 Then in such case it would be useful to make a meta post. Nov 13, 2021 at 20:01
6

I want to believe "efficiently" was used simply for making the description more appealing, i.e. just a connector or fluff that was thoughtlessly added into the description to give it a better appearance.

Either way, it adds no significant meaning in the context of a tag description. Whether it is efficient or not doesn't matter when you're looking just for the meaning of the word and when to use it in SO and not trying to buy in the technology.

So, regardless of whether the blockchain can or not be considered efficient, which as some other users have pointed out, I think depends a lot on our metrics for an efficient ledger, the context of use and the specific implementation; I think the word should be removed from the tag description simply for not being meaningful to know when to use the tag in a SO question.

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