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I got suspended again this time for failing the first-question audit. The two questions that I was suspended for were closed due to the reason "not reproducible or caused by typos". The questions were as follows:

  1. https://stackoverflow.com/q/69279829/15993687
  2. https://stackoverflow.com/q/69388265/15993687

Wouldn't it be good enough if we just check if the question is understandable and related to programming? Should one have to run the snippets to check whether if it was caused by a typo or was not reproducible?


Edit: Stop saying I need to skip, I have indeed skipped a fair number of questions.

My question is: Should the first questions closed due to typo come under audit?

This would mean that the reviewer would have to run the snippets for themselves, which I believe is going to be tedious and we'll never get the required number of reviews done.

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    The questions aren't visible to me (under 10K rep). Were they HTML/CSS/JS questions with a literal runnable snippet or do you just mean copy/pasting the code in an IDE to see if you can reproduce?
    – BSMP
    Oct 29 '21 at 1:01
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    I think the answer is going to be "Yes" either way; there was a recent question about the Late Answer queue and the response is that both it and First Questions do require subject matter expertise: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/412489/4076315
    – BSMP
    Oct 29 '21 at 1:11
  • So how often do people skip the questions? How do people review 20 to 40 questions per day? Does the question in which they have knowledge come up that often?
    – Art
    Oct 29 '21 at 1:23
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    Also, here is the quote from the first question help centre "The First questions queue contains the first few questions created by new users, who may not fully understand the best way to ask questions, or what's on- and off-topic on this site. The purpose of this queue is to give special attention to users who may need to be educated on some aspect of our model, and to questions that are more likely to need improvement." nowhere does it say that it requires subject matter expertise.
    – Art
    Oct 29 '21 at 1:26
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    It does mention "what's on- and off-topic" and typos/unreproducible questions are off-topic. It does later explicitly state that you should be making sure the question is on-topic for the site.
    – BSMP
    Oct 29 '21 at 1:47
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    @BSMP Checking for typos or checking if the problem is reproducible would require one to copy-paste the code and run it. Now, I am not sure how often do people actually run the code in the review. That's why I asked the question, should the question closed under typo come under the audits? if each question requires running the code I am not sure how many users would actually review the questions.
    – Art
    Oct 29 '21 at 1:59
  • @Art While I do cover my position here in my answer, I would like to point out that the review audits don't care what the close reason is as long as a close reason/looks good judgement is provided in accordance to the consensus and "correct" answer (quotes because "correct" does imply the consensus is correct which is not always the case). So basically as is this couldn't be changed without a change to how the review tool works in the first place. Oct 29 '21 at 2:08
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    @Art There's a filter available which you can set to filter the questions by tag. This can be used to show you questions where you are more likely to have expertise.
    – Makyen Mod
    Oct 29 '21 at 2:11
  • @Makyen agreed, but I already do refine and review posts that pop up under the tags that I have saved(without going to the review). If I use the filter then I could probably review 1 or 3 questions max. I really don't think all the people reviewing 20, 30 questions a day have knowledge in the question they are reviewing. So my question still remains shouldn't the question closed due to typo be removed from the audit?
    – Art
    Oct 29 '21 at 2:21
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    @Art There are a lot of questions which can be reviewed which a large percentage of people can say "As a question on SO, it has this/these problem(s) [list]", even with little or no expertise in the technology which is being asked about. Saying "Looks Good" often requires more subject matter expertise than saying "this issue needs to be fixed". If you have no familiarity with the language, then seeing things like typos is substantially harder and are a good reason to "skip".
    – Makyen Mod
    Oct 29 '21 at 2:36
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    If questions which were closed as a typo should be used for audits is a good question. Let's see where opinions are on it. The reality is that the queue is asking people to exercise that type of judgement and make such decisions. As a result of failing the audits you have learned more about what is being asked of you in that queue. That's a reasonable benefit. On the other hand, in the past, audits have been intended only to see if the user is paying a minimum level of attention, not to specifically train users to review.
    – Makyen Mod
    Oct 29 '21 at 2:36
  • Said it before, gonna say it again: If you cannot spot an issue with that specific Python question, you should skip all of them. Oct 29 '21 at 6:44
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    @MisterMiyagi " If you cannot spot an issue with that specific Python question, you should skip all of them" then when should I click on "looks ok"? I am not sure if you read the complete question. The question is whether the questions closed due to typos be used for audits.
    – Art
    Oct 29 '21 at 6:54
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    On the other hand, in the past, audits have been intended only to see if the user is paying a minimum level of attention, not to specifically train users to review. @Makyen True but don't Triage audits also include posts that are closed for whatever reason? It's been a while since I've used it but it isn't only spam/abuse that gets used to audit that queue, right?
    – BSMP
    Oct 29 '21 at 7:01
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    "we'll never get the required number of reviews done." It's not about getting reviews done. It's about fixing or filtering out low-quality and off-topic questions. Everytime a bad question is marked as ok, that makes it harder to do what needs to be done. Oct 29 '21 at 7:22
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One of the buttons you can use during reviews is Skip. If a review comes up and it's of a particular subject you aren't well versed in, you can and should skip it for this very reason. If you can't pass proper judgment on a post in 1-2 minutes, you should also Skip it.

There are still times when you might get bitten with technologies you are familiar with because the code sample is too complex, but then in these cases a close reason of requiring a MCVE/MRE should still have been used. This isn't Code Review. The audit reviews don't care what close reason you use as long as you recommend the expected action as met the consensus.

And if you simply made a mistake, that happens and it's okay. Stuff happens, we're human. If you make one again, no sweat, but the cool down period is meant to help you remember to take your time when reviewing and don't rush. It's not a punishment, it's a mental check that you need to pay attention. Nobody wants to hear that, and if it happens to me I'll admit I tend to audibly groan. But in reality, the system is probably also correct most of the time despite us not wanting to face that fact.

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    But, the question still remains whether it should be that way. The help centre for the first questions asks us to just check if it's on-topic or off-topic for the site and edit if the question needs to be refined.
    – Art
    Oct 29 '21 at 1:31
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    That is not what it says. To quote your quote: The purpose of this queue is to give special attention to users who may need to be educated on some aspect of our model, and to questions that are more likely to need improvement." It goes on to list what to do for each action. It is not limited to checking for on topic posts and refining edits. It also goes into the implications of what happens when you do get it wrong. I would say SME isn't required for all judgements, but is generally required to judge whether it Looks Good or not Oct 29 '21 at 1:38
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Yes. You do have to review typo-questions, so the system must audit typo-questions.


SKIP any question you are not comfortable reviewing for whether it is on-topic. That includes judging whether something is off-topic for any reason, including typos.

Frankly, if you do not see that there is something wrong with the Python question you should skip all Python questions. That is not about expert knowledge, that is about the most basic language concept.
If the audit made you aware you are not yet fit to review these questions, it did its job.

Frankly, I just do not know whether the Java question looks ok. I am not well-versed in the topic.
So I would SKIP it.

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  • You still missed the question. Will you run all the questions under review queue to check for typos?
    – Art
    Oct 29 '21 at 7:09
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    @Art You still missed the answer. If I think I cannot say whether a question is on-topic, I will skip it. If you think you would have to run the code to say whether a question is on-topic but don't do that, you should skip it. Oct 29 '21 at 7:20

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