200
votes

TL;DR: There's been a change in the candidate list for the 2021 Moderator Election. If you've already voted, you should confirm your votes still accurately represent your preferences. Details follow.


It recently came to the attention of the Stack Overflow moderation team that Shree, one of the candidates in the 2021 moderator election, submitted plagiarized content as part of their answers to the questionnaire.

Shree has subsequently made a public admission that he had done so:

It's not Zoe's fault, I copied Zoe's answer.

With that question, I agree with Zoe's answer. When I copy that answer, I'm not sure what's going through my head.

It's a blunder on my part.

We respect and admire anyone who admits to their mistakes and seeks to rectify them. However, this statement did not reflect the extent or severity of the infraction. As subsequent analysis by multiple users (including ayhan and GammaGames) would reveal, the extent of the plagiarism was much greater than copying a single answer from Zoe. We found Shree had copied nearly all of his answers from other candidates who submitted their nominations before his.

On Stack Overflow, plagiarism is viewed as a grave offense. Attribution is absolutely required for all copied content. Our Help Center article on referencing warns:

Do not copy the complete text of external sources; instead, use their words and ideas to support your own. And always give proper credit to the author and site where you found the text, including a direct link to it.

These are the rules of the site, clearly stated, and they apply to all users here, regardless of context. Furthermore, because moderators are the ones who investigate and judge accusations of plagiarism, they must be held to an even higher standard.

The existing moderators and community managers (CMs) have had extensive internal discussions about what, if anything, should be done in response to this finding of plagiarism. The election page notes that a candidate should "lead by example" and "show respect for their fellow community members in their actions and words". It further notes that, because "community moderators are accorded the highest level of privilege in our community", they "should themselves be exemplars of positive behavior and leaders within the community".

Therefore, it is our collective decision that such plagiarism on the part of a nominee is too significant of an offense to overlook. It violates the rules and standards of this community, and it is conduct unbecoming to the role of moderator. We did not arrive at this decision lightly, but we ultimately felt that we had no other choice. In any other circumstance, plagiarism would be handled by deleting the offending post and either warning or suspending the user responsible. A suspension is already reason to disqualify a candidate. Even though we do not feel that Shree's actions would warrant suspension on the first offense, we believe that such actions call the appropriateness of his candidacy into question. If an elected moderator had engaged in similar behavior, there would be serious questions as to whether or not they should remain a moderator.

Based on a super-majority vote of the current moderators, as well as agreement of the community managers, Shree's nomination has been withdrawn. The withdrawal process will follow the procedure established and outlined last year by Juan M when a candidate voluntarily withdrew from the election (except that, with the recent improvements to the election user interface, there is built-in support for withdrawing a nomination, which will be used here).

Since Stack Overflow uses the Single Transferable Vote (STV) method for elections, and voters can now rank all candidates in order from most to least desirable, the withdrawal should have minimal impact on the outcome of the election. For example, if you had selected Shree as your first choice, the STV system will simply use your second choice as if it were your first. As such, there is theoretically no need for you to reconsider your preferences—the change will happen automatically.

Of course, if you choose to do so, you can edit your ballot at any time on the election page up until the election ends on October 26, 2021 at 20:00 UTC (4 PM EDT).

We extend our deepest apologies to the community for the disruption that this causes, and we sincerely hope that everyone can learn something from the mistakes that led up to this choice. We do not hold grudges on Stack Overflow, so we further hope that Shree will see fit to keep up his good work in the flag/review queues and continue assisting us in improving the quality of the site's content.

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  • 74
    Tough call either way. Thank you for the transparency in this regard.
    – TylerH
    Oct 21 at 22:23
  • 30
    While on the topic, has anyone heard from Shree in the last day? It is quite out of the ordinary for him to be so inactive that even his comment reporting bot in his chatroom is offline.
    – Nick
    Oct 21 at 22:25
  • 37
    @Nick No, we haven't. We did try to reach out to him privately first. We have no idea why he has been unavailable, and we would prefer not to speculate. He may simply be having Internet issues, for example.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:31
  • 27
    There's a few too many coincidences at play though. I'm genuinely worried about Shree, largely for the reasons Nick already mentioned. Shree was also online after the bot went offline (by a day), so an internet problem is unlikely. Probably not a discussion that's appropriate to have here, though.
    – Zoe Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:41
  • 38
    Well, people do have lives outside of Stack Overflow. :) Oct 22 at 0:14
  • 9
    @Nick Would you stick around? He messed up, but on top of that, there's been a lot of pretty disgusting hostility involved in this election. I kind of find it hard to believe that there are still people willing to run for this.
    – Dan Mašek
    Oct 22 at 3:26
  • 11
    Seems unfair. you can't expect a billion answers for a single simple question. It is like the user was trying to +1 but he/she thought to explain the same in their own words. That proves the user read it and understands. If anyone has a problem, the user should just update the post by mentioning they agree to the same from another user. removing from the election is too harsh and offensive. Also what is with the public shaming user profile here? what is this site becoming?
    – Mr_Green
    Oct 22 at 4:36
  • 35
    @Mr_Green Yes, it would have been a far better course of action for the user in question to just indicate that they agree with the answers from other specific candidates and that they would moderate in a similar way. That would have done three things. First, it would have avoided the plagiarism issue; second, it would have given attribution to the others whose work they were borrowing; third, it would have still served the purpose of informing the electorate. However, that was not done. Instead, what was done was to copy others' work and claim it as their own. That is not allowed.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 4:39
  • 66
    The intention here is not public shaming, but rather transparency. When someone nominates themselves in a moderator election, they become a very high-profile and public personality. If someone does not want that scrutiny, they should not nominate themselves as a candidate for moderator. We take transparency very seriously. When a candidate is removed from an ongoing election, we need the electorate to understand very clearly what happened and also why it happened. We tried very hard to keep the "shaming" to a minimum, but suppressing the information simply won't do.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 4:40
  • 13
    @Mr_Green The marshal badge is 500 flags, and it's hit relatively fast when a user starts to curate. Some users really push on and get that much flagging done in 3 days. Apart from that, the amount of flags are irrelevant. This post isn't about shaming, it's about people voting and they need to know that a candidate is withdrawn. Also, this is meta, that it's not feasible to make a withdrawal without adding the reason. That's it.
    – Scratte
    Oct 22 at 5:33
  • 7
    @Mr_Green When you participate in partly or fully automated or niche moderation efforts, the marshal badge will take you about 20 days or so to earn from scratch. It's a good indicator that someone participates actively in the flagging system, but not in and of itself an indicator for anything else.
    – Magisch
    Oct 22 at 7:00
  • 28
    It's a shame Shree didn't pull out immediately since it would have avoided all this unpleasantness that has followed. But I do agree with this decision, and I imagine it was an incredibly hard discussion for the mods and CMs to have. I hope we can all move on now and, this is important, lets not direct and personal attacks at Shree. I'm sure he already feels pretty awful.
    – DavidG
    Oct 22 at 8:29
  • 8
    @Mr_Green "he/she thought to explain the same in their own words." → And it would've been OK too if Shree had actually used their own words. But that was clearly not the case. Please have a look at the posts linked in the OP if you haven't already done so.
    – walen
    Oct 22 at 10:25
  • 9
    Unless the candidate themself has voluntarily withdrawn, I don't think "withdrawn" is the correct word. Blocked or rejected would be more appropriate. Oct 22 at 10:38
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    @Trilarion We have not been able to reach Shree to discuss this with him, so the retraction of his nomination was done unilaterally by staff upon request by the elected SO mods. It's not what we would have liked to have happen, either, but all the mods discussed it, and we decided it would be best to act now, rather than wait even longer. I hope that addresses your concerns. Nick had a similar question further up in the comments, which I tried to respond to as well. We certainly welcome Shree to share his side, if he wants to do so, at any time in the future!
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 12:44
116
votes

Ouch. I do agree with the decision, but boy does it still suck to see a small mistake, a momentary lapse of reason, grow into these very public consequences; potentially long lasting ones too knowing how forgiving people can be nowadays.

Let's all try to do the civil thing and consider the forced withdrawal to be the (hefty) punishment - dues paid, done and dusted, now we move on as if Shree never nominated themselves to begin with. I do hope they will decide to continue to contribute to the site as usual... after a little vacation to let wounds heal, perhaps.

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    This is exactly what we are all hoping, yes. You've expressed the sentiments of the mod team much more succinctly than I could manage to above. :-)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 8:43
  • 5
    I fully agree, the punishment is severe and that's that, from now I will act as if none of this ever happened, I also feel some guilt for the proportions this took given that I linked the post where the matter is discussed in a post of my own, I now feel I could have perhaps found another way to make my point in a matter that is not directly related with the plagiarism situation.
    – anastaciu
    Oct 22 at 20:38
  • 10
    @anastaciu You should not feel in any way guilty.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 23 at 0:16
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    @Cody I'll try not to, they seem to have taken it hard, I just hope everything is ok.
    – anastaciu
    Oct 23 at 7:53
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    I'm pretty sure forcibly removing someone from the ballot is going to make them never want to contribute anything on the site ever again. I feel like the mod team overstepped, and as a result of this brash decision (For what he admitted was a blunder), means we lost someone who contributed over 80k flags. Oct 24 at 21:00
  • * with attribution
    – mcalex
    Oct 25 at 2:52
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    @ughStackExchange Maybe, but that can't be used as a mitigation factor here. It doesn't matter if someone has contributed zero or 80k flags, there can't be different rules for different people. In fact, moderators should be held to an even higher standard. Aside from that, I hope Shree comes back, I'm sure he will be welcomed by the majority.
    – DavidG
    Oct 25 at 14:18
  • @DavidG I'm not saying there should be different rules for different people. Whether it be 0 flags or 80k flags, forcing someone from the ballot in this manner is an absolute wrong in my mind. Let the voter decide: Bring it to the attention to the general public, let people discuss it, and let the voters decide. I honestly believe that if this was discussed/featured/hot, Shree would have simply lost from the community. Even if he won, people can attribute it to making a small blunder (That he admitted to). Oct 26 at 9:34
  • I believe it should be my decision if his mistake was something that deemed me not to vote for Shree, just like it was my decision if Zoe should be elected based on her inappropriate messages of abusiveness towards other members. Oct 26 at 9:37
  • 1
    @ughStackExchange How many people would really have read all these meta posts and been able to make an informed decision about who they want as a moderator? You and I may be in the minority on SO. The only safe and effective solution was what was done. The more extreme version was suspending the user. That would have been in the rules but nobody really wanted that.
    – DavidG
    Oct 26 at 10:29
  • @DavidG As I stated in some of the other comments in this post, making an informed decision is up to the voter. You can't get everyone from being informed, and the same goes through for even the election itself. People may not be bothered to read the questions that people posted, and just randomly picked people in order to get the badge. Controversy happens in day-to-day democracy, and getting people to make informed decisions is part of every election. I still believe, it's not up to the mods to make that unilateral decision for me. Oct 26 at 10:38
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    @DavidG And I would argue, that "the more extreme version" of suspending the user, I would actively fight back on as well. The mods themselves agreed that this was not suspension worthy, and I think that IMO it would have been an overreach to get him removed from the election. It's not customary that users are suspended on their first time offenses when mistakes are made. He owned up to the issue, apologized for the blunder, and the community had the tools to make an informed decision on their own. Oct 26 at 10:41
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    @ughStackExchange He didn't own up to the extent of the plagiarism, as evidenced by this comment where he denied copying Zoe's answers to questions 1, 2, and 10. He also slightly paraphrased the answers, apparently with an online tool, in order to try to conceal what he had done. Once exposed, he never apologized directly to Zoe, Ryan M, and Dharman for stealing their answers. Stop downplaying the severity of his actions as if this is normal. Oct 26 at 14:11
43
votes

I think this was a tough decision but overall the right one.

The reasoning for why recently suspended people are disqualified from running is, after all, because the inquiries and drama surrounding the suspension have historically overshadowed the rest of the election process, thereby depriving the community of its fair chance to vet the other candidates.

This rationale applies here as well. Aside from the fact that the conduct demonstrated is unsuitable for a moderator, there's also the fact that this incident generated a large amount of responses and opinions and has dominated the conversation regarding the election.

Overall this was probably in the area of being a judgment call, but I think it's the right one.

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    Yeah, it sucks and it's a less than ideal situation. But letting it stand would have been even less ideal. Too bad it wasn't caught during the candidacy phase, so that Shree had time to either fix the issue one way or another, or withdrawn voluntarily and avoid the drama.
    – yivi
    Oct 22 at 7:04
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    @yivi You say "let it stand", but I think that him coming forward, and the meta posts regarding the subject were more than enough of discussion to alter people's votes and allow him to atone for the actions he took. It's a dangerous precedent to unilaterally remove someone's nomination without their consent. While I feel he no longer deserved my vote, that was MY call, not the Community Manager's. Oct 22 at 8:41
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    That's not entirely true, @ughStackExchange. I think the view you are taking on the democratic process rather is simplistic. If a user does something that makes their candidacy invalid or illegitimate, it is not the voters place to act on that, but whatever officials and guardians the election has to safeguard the process. In this case, CMs and current moderators. The idea is not simply to "affect the vote", but to have a legitimate election. If one of the candidates is no longer deemed legitimate, the voters are not the ones to make that decision.
    – yivi
    Oct 22 at 8:44
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    There's also no mechanism to contact all the voters who ranked him in his ballot to give them the extra information and give them a chance to reconsider - If I had just voted and then gone on to not check back and found this out later, I would be pretty upset.
    – Magisch
    Oct 22 at 8:54
  • 1
    @magisch That unfortunately falls under the concept of misinformed voters, and sadly happens in every election. This is not something that can be changed. Oct 22 at 9:33
  • 2
    "...this incident generated a large amount of responses and opinions and has dominated the conversation regarding the election." I wonder. Does it mean that the election is compromised and maybe should be repeated if there is a result that is close (e.g. a small difference of votes between position 2 and 3)?
    – Trilarion
    Oct 22 at 15:31
  • @Trilarion That would be really hard to justify towards the winner, so I guess not. But it does give you a glimpse of why this decision was reached and why the suspension policy was implemented.
    – Magisch
    Oct 22 at 19:05
  • 1
    Unfortunately, it doesn't give me a glimpse. How is punishing somebody change that attention was taken away from the other candidates in any way? You describe an overall bad impact on the whole election and conclude that this justifies an action against a single candidate. It's not immediately clear how this is helping the whole election. That's why I asked about how compromised the whole election is now.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 22 at 21:44
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    @Trilarion There are 2 aspects to this. First the aspect that plagiarising a whole answer shows conduct incompatible with becoming a moderator. That's probably the lesser reason. The second is that discussion regarding this tends to eclipse the normal vetting process and therefore harms it. By removing the nomination, that disruption ends or is at least seriously reduced.
    – Magisch
    Oct 22 at 22:01
  • 1
    @Magisch The disruption ends? The disruption caused a featured meta post for at least 5 days, bringing more visibility to the issue. Making one simple blunder, "Conduct incompatible" is a bit overboard: What he did wasn't great, but we've all made mistakes over the course of me being on the site (I've been rude/abusive). This caused a far greater disruption by bringing it to light, and by forcibly removing him from the ballot. TBH: I don't think Shree is coming back, and it's specifically due to this overstep. 80k flags, countless months/years curating content...all gone over a silly blunder. Oct 25 at 12:03
17
votes

I do have one question though:

We did not arrive at this decision lightly, but we ultimately felt that we had no other choice.

So you decided to disqualify one of the candidates from the election process for a valid reason, I couldn't agree more.

But what made it a difficult decision?

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    This is a fair question. It was primarily the "human factor" that made the decision difficult. There are real people behind each of these accounts, and, no matter how hard we try to be respectful throughout the process, getting called out in public for a mistake and having your moderator nomination yanked out from underneath you is gonna sting. The "right" thing to do might be abundantly clear, but that doesn't make it easy. Aside from that, there's the fact that we don't take interfering in ongoing democratic elections lightly. There must be a very good reason to do so.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 10:10
  • 11
    At this point, if they let Shree through, it looks bad, if they withdraw his nomination, it looks bad. It’s nearly split 50%(maybe 70-30) on the votes, so I know no matter what they do, they are disappointing half of the people.
    – TheScore
    Oct 22 at 10:15
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    It's a day in the life of a moderator, @TheScore! You're always going to make someone unhappy. Therefore, you have to make sure that you're ultimately on the right side (which we prefer to define as what is the best for the site as a whole), and that you can defend your decision (both to yourself and to the community), not just making a decision on a whim or emotion.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 10:31
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    @CodyGray Mad respect to all the mods out there. You go through the shitstorm daily and that too unpaid(?).
    – TheScore
    Oct 22 at 10:40
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    Yes, it's a purely volunteer position. The only compensation is the warm fuzzy feelings. Some days are colder and less fuzzy than others. @TheScore
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 10:42
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    @CodyGray Tough path you choose. I hope everyone moves on from this abomination but yeah only time can tell. I hope Shree comebacks next year, many were excited to see him as a mod. Though he would have tough time i guess justifying why he did not respond. Communication is the one quality that everyone expects from a mod.
    – TheScore
    Oct 22 at 12:48
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    @TheScore I wouldn't hold that against him. Being away for a few days is perfectly normal.
    – Magisch
    Oct 22 at 12:53
  • @magisch I mean in this meta post he hasn't responded about the other answers in the questionnaire that he plagiarized.
    – TheScore
    Oct 22 at 12:57
  • 2
    @CodyGray I heard you also got the rarest gold badge if you survive long enough so there's that. Oct 22 at 13:55
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    @NearHuscarl Yes, there is a "Sheriff" badge for anyone who has served as an elected moderator for at least 1 year. Unfortunately, there's no way to cash in the gold badges for real gold.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 23 at 3:15
13
votes

Yes, I do have to agree with this as a decision. But it's sad to see this get exploded into a large discussion and lead to many conflicts.

I just do hope he would continue doing all his good work to keep Stack Overflow clean. As reported he's been missing for the last few days...

Also my main hope that everyone can forgive him for this.

And I hope he considers nominating himself for future elections, and provide own versions of questionnaire answers, and hopefully have the same amount of votes as what he would've got without this situation.

Anyway even if he doesn't nominate again in future elections, I hope he is going to keep up the good work in SOBotics and other rooms to keep cleaning up SO.

I have to say this, I was surprised that he plagiarized the other candidates questionnaire answers. I hope he doesn't do that again...

1
  • 7
    What would help people forgive Shree is if he made a public apology for his behaviour and admitted the extent of the offense here, instead of what he actually did, which was to admit he copied one of the answers, and deny copying the rest in this comment. He then took no further action to remove the plagiarized content or apologize directly to those whose answers he stole. Until such time as that happens it will be difficult to forgive. Oct 25 at 16:25
-1
votes

While I do agree that what Shree did was wrong, you yourself mentioned that Shree's offense wasn't "suspension" worthy due to the fact that this was his first offense.

With the exception of already established protocols for removing a nomination (i.e. the user requests it, or if the user is suspended), I think it's wrong of the moderators to override the community's decision by removing his nomination. I think this is for the community to decide: and it should be the community's decision to vote (or not vote) for this candidate based on the discussions that resulted from uncovering what Shree did (and admitted to).

By you removing the nomination: you have basically stifled the democratic process, and you set a very DANGEROUS precedent moving forward. It was not the moderators' place to remove the nomination, and goes against the core values of this site:

On Stack Exchange, we believe the core moderators should come from the community, and be elected by the community itself through popular vote.

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    Upvoting because you raise the serious concern: This precedent must not be used by existing moderator teams to “pre-vet” candidates in routine scenarios. I saw, and participated, in the decision being made. Only because of that, I know that no one on the SO team wants to get in the business of filtering candidates for “goodness” or fitness with the existing team.
    – Undo Mod
    Oct 22 at 2:26
  • 34
    We felt this is the minimum acceptable response for the situation at hand - but you should be skeptical. Short of publishing our transcripts, I can’t prove our motivations. You are right to look on an unprecedented response to an unprecedented situation with concern. Keep us honest.
    – Undo Mod
    Oct 22 at 2:27
  • 6
    Me and you have a very different idea of acceptable responses. I feel like the minimum acceptable response is let the community decide. That is what elections are for: no? Present your concerns, advise by raising discussions in meta, and let the community come to a decision: It's the democratic process. Oct 22 at 2:39
  • 62
    Candidates who break the site rules are not legitimate candidates. Democracy doesn't mean "anything goes". There are still standards. For example, if you commit fraud during the election, you are not eligible to be elected. There is, I'll grant, as @Undo already has, a real danger of a slippery slope, but the check against that is ensuring that the rules are never made after the election (or any other democratic process) has started, and that the rules are always made clearly known to everyone. In this case, they were not only clearly known, but agreed to by all in advance.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 2:55
  • 15
    @CodyGray Well, I'm sure I've broken some rules by being argumentative with a fellow poster, and I've been warned/my comments removed. Does this make me ineligible to be a moderator? The community decided a long time ago, that "a user suspended in the last year is ineligible". When did the rules change, that a non-suspension worthy event made a candidate ineligible? It's not up to the moderators to make a unilateral decision: There was no discussion with the community, no rule change being discussed, just unilateral action...and THIS is wherein lies the problem. Oct 22 at 6:23
  • 6
    @ughStackExchange it was in part the CMs, who set down the rules themselves. And in part it was the moderator team, who are the best representation of the community we can imagine. We, as you suggested, observed due diligence electing each and every one of them, and they are all excellent representatives. If the CMs and our mods agreed, this was the right call. And note that nobody said this was a good choice. By all means it seems to be the lesser of two evils. Oct 22 at 8:20
  • 3
    @Gimby And it was the owners of the site who originally decided to leave it to the community to decide. The rules that were put in place regarding past suspensions, and other requirements for being elected were discussed by the community, and ultimately put in place. To alter rules in the middle of an election, goes against the democratic process. Oct 22 at 8:43
  • 26
    Okay, lots of misinformation starting to come up in the comments here... First, this decision to retract was made by elected SO moderators, not CMs or staff. (Although staff was required to literally push the button to perform the retraction, it was not their call.) Second, no rules were altered during the middle of the election. Nothing here is even close to breaking new ground. Third, there was extremely broad community support for blocking mod nominees who had been suspended within the previous year; it is completely unfair and wrong to represent that as an executive order from staff/CMs.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 8:48
  • 8
    Lol, you think SO is a democracy? That's a good one. Anyways, you might know SO enforces some prerequisites for mod candidates already, such as having 6 required badges before you're allowed to nominate, as well as requiring mods to adhere to the CoC and sign a mod agreement - do you think that's dangerous as well? I'm more concerned that there wasn't a rule for removing any candidate who clumsily plagiarizes more than half of the questionaire from the other candidates. Thankfully the existing mods stepped in and made the right decision.
    – l4mpi
    Oct 22 at 9:46
  • 15
    @Trilarion I very much disagree. I would insist that the elected moderators be the ones who drive things like this, not staff. Maybe it's only symbolic, but it matters to me. The elected moderators were elected by the community and are expected to be their representatives. Staff has no such obligation. Even in a world where I was not among their ranks, I would much rather trust the elected moderators to make a decision like this. (That's not to say bad things about staff. The staff members involved in this, I also trust. But mods have obligations to the community, whereas staff don't.)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 22 at 13:02
  • 3
    @CodyGray I see it differently. As a general rule, the election process should be as independent as possible of the current elected, just as a safeguard. A higher authority must make that decision and for me the important point is actually that the CMs agree. I would not be happy with moderators simply removing people from the candidates list. I trust you personally that you do the right thing here, but in normal life if this were a real election I wouldn't. So I think it's better also not to do that here.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 22 at 13:23
  • 9
    @l4mpi This is a very delicate balance - We do not remove candidates just because the moderators find them problematic. It is not up to the mods to determine whether or not candidates are "qualified" and any candidacy that's made in good faith, no matter the history of the person (excluding suspensions in the last year or other special cases) is valid - we've specifically not removed people in the past that were considered disruptive candidates. This decision was made purely based on behaviors during the election, not prior to it or any judgement of suitability or the candidate.
    – Catija StaffMod
    Oct 22 at 15:15
  • 19
    Also, to be clear, @l4mpi - there's no "conflict of interest" in relation to whatever hypothetical you're proposing. What you're saying will never happen. Ever. Regardless of anything else, the CMs (or any other staff) do not control the candidacy of elections and we can not force someone into an election who doesn't meet the requirements. We can't even vote in the election without sufficient reputation. I understand trust in the company is low but... I'm sorry... this hypothetical is outlandish enough to be actively harmful to our reputation - and so it makes me very uncomfortable.
    – Catija StaffMod
    Oct 22 at 15:18
  • 13
    @l4mpi To add on to what Cat is saying: I guarantee a moderator revolt if the company were ever to install moderators to further a business relationship. Few, if any, of us would put up with that.
    – Undo Mod
    Oct 22 at 15:30
  • 4
    It's surprising to see the community's reaction to this post, exactly 50/50 on this (55 upvotes and 55 downvotes). Oct 25 at 15:12
-35
votes

This is quite the unusual development, but it's clear that the premise itself is unusual. It seems the candidate was punished1 because he couldn't or didn't want to answer the questionnaire himself, and resorted to dishonest means to get around the expectation of answering it.

Now that there's precedent for the moderator/CM team to directly manipulate2 the election process, are there plans to investigate other candidates who couldn't or didn't want to answer the questionnaire themselves, and may have resorted to dishonest means to get around the expectation of answering it?

Normally one might expect that blatant cases of dishonesty such as what we're seeing here would be directly reflected in the votes cast on the candidates. If this assumption is officially recognised to be false, then the door is open for further policing of questionable actions by nominees. Will this happen?

Just to be clear I agree that blatant plagiarism during the mod election nomination itself (or anywhere else, for that matter) is undefendable, and unacceptable. (But I find it somewhat ironic that if the candidate had decided to ditch the whole questionnaire in his nomination, like others have, we wouldn't be here.)


Some clarification post comments:

1I understand that the Powers That Be only pulled the candidate out of the race, as opposed to suspensions or other more heavy-handed actions.

2By "manipulate" I only mean manual interference with the process. I do not mean to imply that the mod/CM team had ulterior motives or some kind of agenda. But changing the consistency of candidates mid-election is by definition manipulation in the former sense.

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    Only thing I take umbrage to here is your choice of words when it comes to this process. This is far from "manipulation" of the election process.
    – Makoto
    Oct 21 at 22:24
  • 6
    @Makoto I don't mean to imply bad faith; they did what they had to do, and what I'd probably have done in their shoes. However "pull out a candidate mid-election" is by definition manipulation. Manual change. Forceful reconfiguration. But yes, I don't intend the word to have moral charge here. Oct 21 at 22:25
  • 39
    The candidate wasn't "punished". In fact, we specifically decided not to punish (our punishment in such cases is to suspend). We have only retracted the nomination because of the clear and compelling evidence of plagiarism. This is not meant as a punishment, nor is it a "manipulation" of the election process. The election process has rules, and they're regularly enforced. Joke candidates have been withdrawn in this election as well as previous ones. If you have evidence that a candidate violated one of the site's rules, then please present it in a confidential mod flag; we'll investigate.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:26
  • 27
    Valid concerns. We are very much not interested in getting in the business of pre-vetting candidates. We don't even agree amongst ourselves that the questionnaire is useful on modern Stack Overflow. We can't ignore plagiarism, though, and we think this is the line we're required to draw.
    – Undo Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:27
  • 17
    To answer your question directly: "may have resorted to dishonest means to get around the expectation of answering it" - yes, if there are people blatantly breaking rules as foundational as plagiarism, we'll investigate it. "Questionable actions" is probably going too far, I think we'll always err on the side of being hands-off in elections. There aren't going to be hairs split in a nomination removal.
    – Undo Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:27
  • 16
    Furthermore, we are not recognizing as "false" the assumption that voters could have made their own decision, taking the evidence into account. We still generally feel that is true. However, we had no choice but to step in because one of the candidates literally broke the site's rules during the nomination process. This isn't just a general condemnation of dishonesty. It is a specific condemnation of a specific type of dishonesty: plagiarism, which is called out very clearly in the rules.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:28
  • 3
    Thank you both. And fair enough, @Cody, although arguably removing a candidate's chance to be a moderator (even with good reason) is punishment in itself. Oct 21 at 22:28
  • 17
    The difference here, I think, is that the concerns you have other actions of another candidate relate to behavior that you think is unethical and, therefore, in your opinion, unbecoming to the conduct of a moderator. That is a completely valid opinion to hold, to base your vote on, and even to express publicly in the context of the ongoing election. However, the actions that bother you didn't break any rules as they are currently defined, so we are not going to be taking any action there. After the election is over, perhaps we can start a discussion about modifying the process.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:47
  • 4
    Yeah, I completely get that, @Cody. Still, this sets new precedent and I thought there to be worth in discussing this point. Oct 21 at 22:48
  • 33
    FWIW participation in the questionnaire has always been voluntary. It's not a good idea for a candidate to ignore it, but there's no rule there
    – Machavity Mod
    Oct 21 at 22:49
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    Withdrawing someone's candidature is not, strictly speaking, punitive. Oct 22 at 4:57
  • 6
    Meh regarding the manipulation of the election. Stack Exchange has never been a strict democracy, with some moderators elected pro-tempore without an election, some moderators being assigned based on being the runnner-up of a previous election, moderator status being revoked without consulting the community, etc. This doesn't set a precedent for anything that was previously unusual imo.
    – Erik A
    Oct 22 at 12:05
  • They may have thought that there's an expectation to answer, and there may be some, but there are enough instances of people not answering: stats.stackexchange.com/election/5 physics.stackexchange.com/election/3 - there's even a case of someone saying that they won't answer nor write in the nomination, so don't vote for them; they won. --- Certainly whatever expectations one might presume, answering dishonesty wouldn't be one of them; unless they are a politician IRL.
    – Rob
    Oct 24 at 7:00
  • 3
    Candidate was disqualified, that is neither a punishment nor a manipulation of the election. Gripes about another candidate seems entirely unrelated to this plagiarism incident, isn't it beating a dead horse to rehash it all here?
    – wim
    Oct 26 at 17:49
  • 1
    @wim it wasn't quite dead yet when I posted this answer. Oct 26 at 19:59

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