16

I had answered a question about assembly optimization, and soon after that my answer was superseded by far better answers.

Still, recently I got a score bump as that answer received a bounty. It looks like a mistake. Is there a way to decline it?

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  • 6
    Looks like the Bounty user chose to award it to you specifically.
    – Larnu
    Oct 19 at 15:46
  • 3
    Where's the problem? Nobody awarded you a bounty ;) Oct 19 at 15:48
  • 1
    No, mods can't even revert it (I just tried on a site where I'm a mod). Only SE employees can.
    – Andrew T.
    Oct 19 at 15:50
  • 2
    The user awarded 3 bounties that day after not awarding any bounties for 4 years. While this does seem... out of place, there's no reason to assume any ill-intent or a mistake.
    – Kevin B
    Oct 19 at 15:50
  • 4
    It's certainly possible that they just arbitrarily chose questions/answers to bounty, but there's no rule against that. It just can't be used to transfer rep to co-workers/friends/socks/"paying customers".
    – Kevin B
    Oct 19 at 16:07
  • 6
    If you think there are other answers that deserve the bounty more than yours, you can start a new bounty on the same question and award it to one of the other answers. Oct 19 at 16:49
  • 3
    It looks to me like the bounty looked for "Authoritative reference needed".. I'm not quite sure what to make of that.
    – Scratte
    Oct 19 at 20:54
  • @DonaldDuck: In this case, the other answer Alex is talking about is mine. I don't need the rep. Oct 20 at 22:51
  • 1
    @KevinB: As well as it being 3 bounties in a day after 4 years, they also changed their username to "Nobody" soon after. Very weird case here, makes me wonder what's going on with them. That probably rules out just mis-clicks (on bounty reason and/or on the target answer). Oct 20 at 22:54
  • 3
    I haven't really used SO in years and keep getting ≈10k rep/year from a few months of activity in 2011, so I decided to give it all away randomly. It's funny that this is what results of that
    – Nobody
    Oct 21 at 15:22
31

It can’t be declined. The user chose to award it to you, for their own reasons. Good for you.

But if you do not want it, pay it forward.

Award a bounty to some answer you find more deserving. Or post a bounty on a question you think it would benefit from the attention.

Or even better, work on your answer so it's more deserving of the bounty. Nothing stops you from editing and improving it until it's great, so you no longer feel the bounty is misplaced.

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    Thanks, will wait a day to make sure it indeed will not be resolved by moderation/staff, then will do that Oct 19 at 17:07
  • 1
    Good call. It always sucks to have withdrawn currency before the bank reverts a deposit. Oct 19 at 18:36
-1

I've deleted the answer. Peter's very detailed answer anyway mentions the solution in my answer as one of the options (See bswap r64 part).

Surprisingly, I can delete an answer with bounty.

The reputation is subtracted back, and wrongly bounties answer is no longer visible, so I'm satisfied with this solution.

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  • 7
    Doesn't that essentially waste 500 reputation points for the person who awarded it to you? It's not like they get any of that back. (Is it because of that one question in the search you linked to?)
    – BSMP
    Oct 20 at 5:14
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    @BSMP, whatever. When other users find the question, they will not see an answer with a no reason bounty, this is what I was trying to solve mostly. Apparently the only way to refund the bounty to the awarder is to bounty some their answer back, which will just contribute to the nonsense. Oct 20 at 5:21
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    @AlexGuteniev: yivi's answer here points out that you could award the rep to someone you think is deserving, e.g. a lower-rep user who contributed something valuable and could use the bump. But yeah, I agree with your overall goal of hiding that early simple answer so future readers aren't wondering why it has a bounty. Even the original bounty reason (seeking an "authoritative answer") seemed very weird since my answer already cited sources for its perf analysis. The user that awarded it even changed their username right after, perhaps out of shame? IDK. Oct 20 at 22:48
  • this was a bad decision as i clearly stated, who are you to decode what people think are useful.
    – nbk
    Oct 21 at 23:24
  • @nbk: We understood your statement (answer); that's separate from agreeing with it. As for "who is Alex to decide", he's contributed patches to MSVC's headers to get it making more efficient code for a few things, and has some experience with assembly language. So I think he's qualified to judge his own answer as being something that future readers should skip in favour of another. (I happen to agree since it was mine :P) But yeah, a version of the code he suggested is already present as one of the special-case options in my answer (optimizing for code-size not speed). Oct 22 at 15:30
  • @PeterCordes someone found the answer and like it so much, that he awardeed 500 poits for it, so it is besides a bunch of upvotes usefull, depriving future searcher of that solution is a bad decision and should be reversed so i voted to undelete it
    – nbk
    Oct 22 at 21:30
  • @nbk: Did they really like it, though? The bounty awarder recently commented on this question that they decided to give their rep away randomly. Besides, if someone bounties a simpler but objectively less good answer, I think it's fine if that poster of that answer chooses to delete it to make sure future readers are directed toward the answer that they think is better. If it was an alternative with a different explanation, you'd have a point, but no. Oct 22 at 23:49
  • @PeterCordes it is the first correct answer to the described problem, the highest answer has theh exact same code only with more explanation. So basically the answerer did post a working solution,that alone, deserves an upvote so i don't see, why he wants to remove the answer.
    – nbk
    Oct 23 at 10:24
-9

Keep it as you can't decline it. Someone found your solution to be the best for them and you really need points as do all users under 25k reputation.

Never assume that your answer couldn't help other people despite it being superseded by newer answers.

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    I don't understand the part about "needing points" (I assume you mean reputation). Why do you feel that the OP is in need of additional reputation?
    – cigien
    Oct 19 at 20:36
  • @cigien every use useer 25k needs reputation even unwanted ones
    – nbk
    Oct 19 at 20:38
  • 2
    Hmm, that's interesting. The only privilege I recall getting at 25k was the site-analytics thing, and I wasn't particularly impressed :p It's fine, I guess, I just wouldn't describe it as necessary.
    – cigien
    Oct 19 at 20:42
  • yes, but from 6,9 k to 25 is a long way, so he will get better ones ones, but honestly besides twp or thre that you get early and the 50 votes what else do you need on a daily basis
    – nbk
    Oct 19 at 20:53

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