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This question asks reasons of why some Linux APIs are deprecated. An API that became obsolete is a fact, and deprecating an API needs reasons, not personal opinions.

At first I thought it was due to the last sentence ("how can I find more about why an API becomes deprecated"), which leads to personal ideas of learning methods. After deleting this sentence, the question failed to reopen.

Please give me a reason. The feedback is straightforwardly simple yet unhelpful: "This question is opinion-based" and "Original close reason(s) were not resolved".

15
  • 5
    Even if you get an answer to that question, how is that helpful in solving a practical programming problem? We're not a trivia collection, wikipedia perfectly fills that gap.
    – rene
    Oct 17 at 7:59
  • "and deprecating an API needs reasons, not personal opinions.". Er. Not exactly. A deprecation may happen because the maintainer of a package thinks "new approach B is better than old approach A", which no matter how well justified it's going to be a matter of opinion (and there are going to be always some that disagree). Or because "C already exists that provides the same functionality than A, but has a more consistent fooBar, thus will remove A to simplify maintenance and documentation". Some things will be simpler, but that the trade off is worth it's a matter of opinion as well.
    – yivi
    Oct 17 at 8:03
  • True, you are not asking about the "answerers opinion" about the deprecation, you are hopefully asking for answerers to rely the hopefully documented opinion of the maintainers about these deprecations.
    – yivi
    Oct 17 at 8:06
  • 2
    If the reason for deprecation is just that the maintainer of the package thought so, then that is the answer, @yivi. I see no reason whatsoever for this question to be closed as opinion-based. Perhaps a bit too unfocused, as you're asking about all of the deprecated APIs, instead of just a specific one.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 17 at 8:07
  • Yes, @CodyGray, that was going to be my next point. Even if not actually OB (my second comment), the question is not adequately scoped. Is it about a number of deprecations? All the deprecations happening on the Time APIs (which might happen for different reasons, about deprecations in general? Etc. That on top of the general "please find for me where the discussion about these deprecations took place", which I find rather not useful and not practical.
    – yivi
    Oct 17 at 8:11
  • @yivi Maybe you should write an answer expressing your concerns. :-)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 17 at 8:13
  • 1
    @Cody Gray Yes the question is mainly about time APIs, because I found them a little mess and don't think there's a security hole or other things to abandon them desperately. I will try to narrow question scope next time :)
    – user239216
    Oct 17 at 8:15
  • 4
    Not next time. Fix this question while you can.
    – rene
    Oct 17 at 8:18
  • 1
    @rene The friendly mod has already helped me on that.
    – user239216
    Oct 17 at 8:20
  • 4
    Where did you find a friendly mod??
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 17 at 8:23
  • 2
    @user239216 Cody is even scarier with the new profile pic :D
    – 41686d6564
    Oct 17 at 8:24
  • Why do you need the answer to that question (not a rhetorical question)? Oct 17 at 9:54
  • @PeterMortensen First, I found Linux time APIs a little messy. Second, deprecation means something unforeseen happens, and I want to learn something about it and try to avoid same thing happens in the future.
    – user239216
    Oct 17 at 10:49
  • Would not it be nice if Linux source code is publicly available under some sort of Open Source license so people could look at history and read commit descriptions when interested. And add such information to their historical question... Ohhh well - not a perfect world we live in :) Oct 19 at 2:31
  • BTW, @user239216 is you find a time API that is not "little messy" stick to that language/framework/platform forever (or at least till next daylight saving date change :) ) Oct 19 at 2:33
-9

You are correct that the question is not opinion based.

While the decision to deprecate a function/API itself is ultimately based on the opinions of the people who control the API, most of the time there is a justification for this decision, that is documented in documentation, in a commit message, or some blog. So there is usually a definite and correct answer for questions asking for such a justification.

Thus the question has been correctly reopened. Thanks for bringing it up on meta. It is important for such mistakes to be corrected.

14

Even after the edit by a friendly mod and the binding re-open vote I still feel the question is opinion based.

What are the reasons for these decisions?

Only the maintainers can answer that and then the outcome might be a mess: We all had 10 beers, didn't sleep for the night and at daybreak we decided to obsolete the whole frigging API.

Why does it matter what the reasons for deprecating are? It is trivia at best. A more interesting question would be:

I have this (old) code that uses stime() and it works but the documentation states it is deprecated. I would rather replace that call with something that isn't deprecated / obsoleted. What is the intended drop-in replacement given I need this code to still run / compile in my current context without changing semantics.

I expect an awesome answer to that question to list your options and offer you how to replace the call to stime() with the best fit. Awesome answers do provide background, history and rationale. That might include beer and sleepless nights.

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  • I mean... The reopen vote isn't actually binding like a mod close vote is
    – Nick
    Oct 17 at 9:06
  • 1
    @Nick well, I'm not going to counter vote a mod vote, so I would rather consider them binding but it is free for everyone to pick a fight with Cody. I'm passing on that one, I've better things to do.
    – rene
    Oct 17 at 9:11
  • 2
    I agree that this might well be a more interesting and more useful question. I do not, however, agree that the existence of more interesting questions in alternate universes makes this one primarily opinion-based. If the answer to the question about obsolescence is that the devs had 10 beers, then that's the answer, and it might well be useful to someone who is considering whether it is reasonable to continue using those "obsolete" APIs.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Oct 17 at 9:35
  • 4
    "Why does it matter what the reasons for deprecating are? It is trivia at best." By learning an deprecated API programmers can avoid same mistake in the future. Why do you say it is trivial? "A more interesting question would be:..." This is a trivial question since the newer API is clearly well-documented.
    – user239216
    Oct 17 at 9:40
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    "By learning an deprecated API programmers can avoid same mistake in the future." - What mistake? Deprecation implies change (potentially for totally arbitrary reasons), not mistakes @user239216
    – Nick
    Oct 17 at 9:44
  • 1
    @Nick Deprecating or even deleting an API(such as stime()) will break old programs so such decisions are made very carefully. Can "totally arbitrary reasons" really make a deprecation accepted?
    – user239216
    Oct 17 at 9:49
  • 4
    @user239216 Deprecation cannot break old programs, because one of the key parts of deprecation is that nothing gets removed, they're specifically left in to allow backwards compatibility. You're worried about removal, which is a different thing.
    – Nick
    Oct 17 at 9:51
  • @Nick Who said that deprecation is guaranteed not to lead to removal? As an example, from the .NET docs: "Marking an element as obsolete informs users that the element may be removed in a future version of the product". That does not, however, mean that it will break old programs. Old program may break when upgrading to a newer version of the language/framework though.
    – 41686d6564
    Oct 17 at 10:35
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    @41686d6564 That's later, not now, while deprecation can lead to removal, it itself is not removal.
    – Nick
    Oct 17 at 10:37
  • @Nick Yes, agreed. Your comment just made it sound like deprecating something means that it will not be removed in the future. Maybe I misunderstood it.
    – 41686d6564
    Oct 17 at 10:42
  • @41686d6564 Nah, I could've been a bit more explicit, was on my phone so kept it brief
    – Nick
    Oct 17 at 10:43
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    @Nick Deprecated APIs will generate tons of warnings in old projects. If you work on something high-demanding on this then it means "break". And deprecation MAY lead to removal. In some cases people need to fix it in case the actual removal happens someday.
    – user239216
    Oct 17 at 10:45

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