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My answer included a critique of another answer. The critique included a 25-line program as proof.

The other answer has since been edited (temporarily?):

@bobcat: Dropped the PS for now. – einpoklum

Am I supposed to remove the critique now, or the motivation for writing it? What's the etiquette? If I hadn't posted the critique, the other answer would still be spreading incorrect info, so I feel like my critique is useful.

The other person seems unhappy about it, offered me a +1 if I edit out the quote (The comment that did that has since been edited or replaced also). Hence the question.

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  • 3
    Your answer should stand by itself. It is indeed bad etiquette to critique another author's answer. Oct 9 at 13:59
  • 10
    @SecurityHound Why exactly is that? If you find something is off, it would be natural to reference it and explain why that might be a bad idea and offer another solution.
    – Scratte
    Oct 9 at 14:05
  • 6
    "The other person seems unhappy about it, offered me a +1 if I edit out the quote" That's a silly form of bribery.
    – Mast
    Oct 9 at 14:06
  • 1
    Using a comment on the other answer is the most common approach to pointing out flaws or critiquing. No need to modify your answer then if they modify theirs based on your comments
    – charlietfl
    Oct 9 at 14:12
  • @charlietfl That section (with the code) wouldn't fit in a comment
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 14:13
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    @Mast Yes. That was unpleasant.
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 14:16
  • @Mast: It would be a silly form of bribery, if it were bribery, which it isn't. The +1 is merited.
    – einpoklum
    Oct 9 at 14:18
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    I've seen plenty of Answers where I thought "If only they added this or removed that, it would be a good Answer (and I'd upvote it)".
    – Scratte
    Oct 9 at 14:24
  • @Scratte: With new contributors, if I leave feedback in the comments, and they make a sincere effort to edit and improve their post, I’ll upvote the post. I’ve though about dangling this as an extra incentive. I haven’t yet because a lot of edits are insufficient, and I don’t want it to seem obligatory. But I’ve certainly thought about it. Oct 9 at 16:22
  • This seems really simple? If someone critiqued an answer in the comments and the author edited the answer to address the critique, I’d flag the critique as “No longer needed”. And if I had made the critique myself, I’d delete my comment. You did your duty to call out something you thought was incorrect, and it was addressed. I don’t see why you wouldn’t delete it. After all, it’s no longer relevant once the issue it highlighted is resolved. Oct 9 at 16:29
  • @JeremyCaney I've only considered doing that. But I kind of decided against it, because sometimes even an edit isn't quite enough to win me over. I also sometimes think that an OK Answer shouldn't get a downvote more than it should get an upvote.
    – Scratte
    Oct 9 at 17:03
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    @Scratte: I should probably be more liberal with my downvotes. Right now, I reserve them for really irresponsible, misleading advice. With new contributors who are actually responsive and put real effort into improving, though, I’m more than happy to give them a bump, even if the answer isn’t quite up to my standards; those contributors will get molded quickly by Stack Overflow’s incentive structures once they’re on the reputation train. I definitely hear you with insufficient edits, though! And then there’s the people who get really put out by being asked to offer an explanation 🙄 Oct 9 at 17:16
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    "I don’t see why you wouldn’t delete it." -- I guess being bribed to do it was what I found offensive. If someone pointed out a conceptual misunderstanding on my part, especially one that potentially made my software slower, I'd be grateful and not dangle a +1 in front of them.
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 17:32
  • @bobcat: Yeah, I get that. But remember that Stack Overflow is meant to be a bit like a Wiki. When future readers come to the thread, what matters is that they see the best answers without distraction. How those answers came to be and whatever comments or edits it took for them to get there are no longer relevant. Think of your critique as scaffolding that allowed you to improve the thread. I get that the interpersonal dynamics can be a bitter pill to swallow, but we’re doing all of this for future readers, not other authors; keep the audience in mind. Oct 9 at 17:54
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It looks like you use a Q/A as a forum thread. An answer should not include critique of another answer. An answer should answer a question, preferable the question asked. As such it should stand on its own.

An answer can point out alternative solutions that might have shortcomings and explain why those alternatives are not well suited in the context of the question asked.

Following this approach you never have to edit your answer if other answers change suit.

You can express your critique in the form of a downvote. If you're generous, leave a comment explaining your objections to (parts of) the answer. Which you did. Which led to a change made by the OP to their answer. (Timing doesn't matter.) The system works as designed.

No mudslinging is needed. Raise a No Longer Needed Flag on any comments that express dissatisfaction or suggest voting advice. Those are noise.

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    "Which lead to an change made by the OP to their answer." Not quite. The change was made not after my comment, but after I wrote and posted the 25-line code that showed that part of the answer to be incorrect (about 3 hours later)
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 15:35
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    @bobcat the change was made. What do you expect to happen? Fire from heaven to come down on someone?
    – rene
    Oct 9 at 16:04
  • @rene: Seriously. This whole thread is so bizarre! I think it’s awesome that Stack Overflow’s model successfully incentivizes contributors to improve their answers, and that incorrect or unsupported claims are usually corrected, downvoted, or, eventually, deleted. The entire exchange leading up to this post seems like the system working. I wish other collaborative sites (ahem, social media) operated this way. I’d call it a good day on the Internet. Oct 9 at 16:48
  • 1
    "the change was made" Your point was that a comment alone is enough to show something is incorrect. But that's not the case. A 25-line program wouldn't fit in a comment.
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 16:53
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    @bobcat that is totally not my point.
    – rene
    Oct 9 at 17:02
  • 1
    "that is totally not my point" -- Arrive at the point, please, but first address this factual error I pointed out.
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 17:17
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    @bobcat: You’re probably at that point where it makes sense to step away from this thread for a day, then come back in your morning and reread the comments with fresh eyes. I suspect you’re too down in your frustration with how the original exchange played out, and aren’t hearing the broader points being made by the community on this thread. Oct 9 at 17:22
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Author of the other answer here.

First, you're partially mis-represting the situation. You had critiqued a Postscript (PS) at the bottom of my answer, and as a result, I retracted that comment; I didn't just "edit the answer".

What's the etiquette

As I have retracted a statement, by removing it entirely - that means I no longer want to make it. I would be (somewhat) offended if you kept the attribution to me in your answer.

You can easily keep that part of your answer by saying something like "If you are wondering about the possibility of ABC, then XYZ" - so you can still have the crux of the removed statement as an anonymous straw-man argument.

The other person seems unhappy about it

About you insisting to say I'm claiming someting I've retracted? Yeah, I'm unhappy about that.

offered me a +1 if I edit out the quote

I didn't offer you anything. Your answer merits a +1, except the part where you're quoting a statement which I had retracted. And that's what I wrote. It was a compliment after your having convinced me.

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    " I retracted that comment" When you say "comment", you are actually referring to a section of your answer. You retracted it by editing your answer. In what way am I misrepresenting the situation (even partially)?
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 14:27
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    @bobcat: A PS section is a comment, separate from the main text. If you want to split hairs, fine, I retracted a "PS section". You are misrepresenting the situation by not saying I retracted the part you had quoted.
    – einpoklum
    Oct 9 at 14:48
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    But you didn't retract it. You "Dropped the PS for now.". In any case, you edited your answer. Where is the misrepresentation? A "PS" section is part of the answer, not a comment under it.
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 14:52
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    "I didn't offer you anything." -- You wrote "I'll give you a +1 if ... " How is that not an offer?
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 14:55
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    @bobcat - What's your end game here? You take umbrage with the "for now"? How about considering your own comment: "A timing experiment could be used to reject this hypothesis" - You made einpoklum doubt the PS, they retracted it (maybe "for now" until running the experiment and seeing for themselves). You want to display etiquette? Stop splitting hairs to forcibly put someone "in the wrong" somehow. Oct 9 at 15:04
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    @StoryTeller-UnslanderMonica Well, the PS was dropped (for now) after I wrote the code showing it was wrong, not after my comment.
    – bobcat
    Oct 9 at 15:08
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    @bobcat - I have to say, so far the encounter reflects poorly on you, not einpoklum. And you clearly don't care for other (very reasonable) alternative interpretations of events. This alone makes this Q&A close worthy. Nothing to be gained here. Oct 9 at 15:10
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    @bobcat: I actually saw your comment before seeing your answer (as the answer does not show up in a notification - only the comment does). But regardless - I'm sorry if my comment on your answer sounded like an inappropriate offer.
    – einpoklum
    Oct 9 at 20:09

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