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As on Wikipedia, a "safe navigation operator" allows dereferencing an object property or array that might be null, giving a null result rather than an exception or error. Wikipedia lists the concepts as synonymous:

the safe navigation operator (also known as optional chaining operator, safe call operator, null-conditional operator)

However, these exist separately on SO:

  • (23 questions). Term used on Wikipedia and in Angular documentation; used for a variety of languages but seem to be focused on Angular. No tag info.

  • (96 questions). Term used in TypeScript documentation; questions seem mostly about TypeScript. Tag info:

    Optional chaining is a process for querying and calling properties, methods, and subscripts on an optional that might currently be nil/null . If the optional contains a value, the property, method, or subscript call succeeds; if the optional is nil/null , the property, method, or subscript call returns nil/null.

  • (69 questions). Questions seem to focus on C# (as this is the term used in C# documentation) with some VB and other languages. Tag info:

    A Safe navigation operator used to test for null before performing a member access (?.) or index (?[]) operation.

  • (32 questions). Questions are mostly C# with one Javascript outlier. Tag info:

    The null-propagation operator, introduced in C# 6.0, eliminates the need for multiple null checks within a method call chain.

  • "safe call operator" doesn't exist, but by searching it seems that it refers to the same concept in Kotlin, as listed in Kotlin docs. We could pre-emptively create a tag synonym there, since it looks like that would be immediately useful.

The concept is clearly the same; the terms vary in usage based on the language in question, but we can already search with language tags to achieve the same result. I suggest the canonical name to match Wikipedia and to make it easier to find cross-language requests ("how do I do optional chaining in [language X]?").


REVISED SUGGESTION: The existence of ("setting a default value if a condition evaluates to null") versus (the specific language feature, with PHP in its taginfo) implies that maybe what we're looking for here is a common tag to be created. I lean in favor of marking tags like , , , and as synonyms of that general/conceptual tag, but there's an argument to be made that like with there's space for both tags.

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    I like this, and think it makes sense. I'm also a bit concerned that "safe navigation operator" may not be recognizable enough to some folks (myself included, I work with C# and JS on a daily basis and have somehow never heard that term before!).
    – zcoop98
    Oct 4, 2021 at 17:32
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    "optional chaining" in JavaScript is slightly different from "null conditional operator" in C# due to the presence of undefined in JavaScript. Optional chaining takes into account both null and undefined, whereas C#'s null conditional operator does not have to. I don't know if that's enough of a difference to keep them separate (there may be questions unique to JS's handling of undefined), but I thought I'd throw it out there. Oct 4, 2021 at 19:55
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    Oh, and while it was unique to TypeScript for a while, it has since been incorporated into ECMAScript (and thereby JavaScript) as well. Oct 4, 2021 at 19:57
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    @HereticMonkey Yes, it's indeed part of ES2020; I didn't link it here because the spec is pretty inscrutable, but MDN adopts the term optional chaining as well. As for the cross-language differences in semantics, the TC39 repo describes that well, noting that C# is more like JS than (say) Kotlin/Dart/Ruby due to short-circuiting and LHS usage. Oct 4, 2021 at 20:10
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    Similar type questions (with no consensus) exist for other terms, including hash tables and variable length arguments. Oct 4, 2021 at 23:01
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    If I had a question using this tag it would be the C# null-conditional operator. Since others have indicated this is too specific and other tags have subtle differences, I'm not so sure I'd want that as the common name; and I wouldn't want this key feature of a major programming language not to have its own tag. Oct 5, 2021 at 2:28
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    While I think synonymizing these may be a good thing, I think safe-navigation-operator is the worst choice. I've done both C# and JS and never heard it called that. I just asked my coworker who does Angular and he didn't even recognize the term, he also described Angular's concept naming scheme to be so obscure as to be meaningless most of the time.
    – van dench
    Oct 5, 2021 at 13:27
  • @vandench if Google were to get into arboriculture, the tag multipartite-arborescent-graph would need to become a synonym for forest Oct 5, 2021 at 19:14
  • Do we really need a tag for these? Isn't these features pretty language (implementation?) specific and with very disjointed meaning across languages?
    – Braiam
    Oct 6, 2021 at 11:55
  • @Braiam This functionality isn't particularly implementation specific, that's why the overarching term exists. Every single instance is some form of "read/ use this value if it's safe to do so"; even if the usage is slightly different language to language, the concept is pretty universal.
    – zcoop98
    Oct 6, 2021 at 14:16
  • @zcoop98 and that's enough to warrant a tag? I don't think so. I've never seen a question that asks about those in the abstract (or much of anything in abstract considering that this site is for practical questions), but always tied to the language. You are just leaning on my argument: those topics are already covered by their respective language tags.
    – Braiam
    Oct 6, 2021 at 14:56
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    @Braiam The kind of cross-language question I'm talking about here is this one. Note the comments: "looking for date of support for Null Propagation Operator in node js" -> "search for Optional chaining". There are several others as well. Oct 6, 2021 at 16:31
  • @JeffBowman eh? I see those more as "I know this feature exist somewhere, does language X supports it?" Also, kinda of an XY question: why the asker needs null propagation?
    – Braiam
    Oct 6, 2021 at 16:42
  • Swift has something called optional chaining too. But it's a pretty basic and probably doesn't have a lot of questions about it.
    – aheze
    Oct 6, 2021 at 17:02

4 Answers 4

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I agree that these tags should be synonymised. There is also a tag which should be included in this.

I think shouldn't be the canonical one. It has the fewest tagged questions, and it doesn't include null in its name. I also think "navigation" could be misleading to people who aren't already familiar with this usage of it (normally I would say property access, array access, etc., not property navigation or array navigation). I would favour or being the canonical one, since the word null appearing in the tag name makes the tag more useful when it appears on the main page or in searches.

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    optional-chaining doesn't mention "null" either despite having the most questions, but I take your point about discoverability and how "safe navigation" is unusably ambiguous in the broader SO context—even acknowledging Wikipedia's assertion that it is the most common name for this operator among listed languages. Oct 5, 2021 at 2:13
  • @JeffBowman I must have been tired when I wrote this - fixed, thank you.
    – kaya3
    Oct 5, 2021 at 11:18
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    Given the name concerns here, and the occurrence of null propagation operator in the original TC39 spec and posts from that time, I've revised my suggestion to dedupe against a to-be-created tag null-propagation. Oct 6, 2021 at 16:46
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I am admittedly biased as I encounter the on nearly a daily basis, and if I had a question about it, that's the only term I'd recognize of the three proposed.

I'll repeat a comment by Heretic Monkey to the OP here:

"optional chaining" in JavaScript is slightly different from "null conditional operator" in C# due to the presence of undefined in JavaScript. Optional chaining takes into account both null and undefined, whereas C#'s null conditional operator does not have to. I don't know if that's enough of a difference to keep them separate (there may be questions unique to JS's handling of undefined), but I thought I'd throw it out there.

To me, this is sufficient differentiation not to combine at these two tags. They are specifically documented features of major programming languages, and have differences in their implementations.

I won't speak to the more vague "safe navigation" operator and wouldn't oppose combining it with something or making it angular-specific, but I see more value in the separate tags than I would with a combined/synonomized tag.

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    There are implementation differences in map-function and proxy-object too, but those have emerged as multilingual tags as well. My motivation for the proposal was this poorly-received question here: I'd initially hesitated to link due to the meta effect, but the short version is that the OP tagged their question as safe-navigation-operator where a tag de-duped against optional-chaining might have helped them surface duplicates and related questions better. Who benefits from having them separate? Oct 5, 2021 at 5:12
  • @JeffBowman "who benefits from having them separate" -- my general litmus test for a tag is expertise from someone who might want to follow the tag and answer questions. I can see a C# expert answering ?. questions and having no clue about "optional chaining". Oct 5, 2021 at 5:15
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    I think the distinction between null and undefined for the purpose of this operator is trivial; it's exactly the same concept in both C# and Javascript, even though Javascript has two different "null" values.
    – kaya3
    Oct 5, 2021 at 12:52
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I believe that "navigation" is the worst possible term. The "the most widely used term" claim seems to be rather shaky, as in 23 cited references this term is used as primary only in 3 of them, for Ruby, Groovy and Salesforce Apex, and for 4th and final time is mentioned as "also called" for Python.

I object "safe navigation operator" on the grounds that we'd have first to establish that "navigation operator" is accepted and widely understood term for "dereference-and-access". Quick search shows that this phrase is virtually unknown on its own (without "safe") - mere 2k hits for "navigation operator" programming -safe. For most frontend technologies, "navigation" refers to UI actions, not language concepts, thus I find the term extremely misleading.

IMHO we should wait for the general programming community to agree on a commonly understood name. Which may or may not be "safe navigation". For now it's better to keep community divided under names the parts recognize rather than unite them under name recognized by no one.

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    I disagree, the dev community simply isn't going to do this on their own, SO is the right place to establish the new community driven standard because we are all across many languages. When I want to know the syntax for null conditional (and null coalesce) in a new language, SO is the first place i go to. I've done this a few times now over the years and each time I have to try multiple terms, synonyms would fix a lot of that. Oct 6, 2021 at 12:00
  • Seconding Chris that it's unlikely that there will be an organic commonly-understood name without us putting our thumb on the scale, since "optional chaining" is the official name in the published ECMAScript standard and "null propagation operator" is the published name in C# and VB.NET etc. Those names won't change on their own. Ironically, though, the term null propagation operator exists in TC39 as the name that predates "optional chaining", so there's a fair argument that that's the general descriptor. Oct 6, 2021 at 16:27
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Self-answer for voting's sake:

The existence of ("setting a default value if a condition evaluates to null") versus (the specific language feature, with PHP in its taginfo) implies that maybe what we're looking for here is a common tag to be created.

Let's create and synonymize , , , and to it.

If we want to go further, we can synonymize to by the same logic.

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    JS doesn't propagate null though but undefined
    – Bergi
    Oct 7, 2021 at 12:42
  • @Bergi It reacts to null and undefined both, and always returns undefined. It's a "nullish" value on MDN. I see what you're saying, but I don't think the chasm between "nullish" and "null" is all that great; undefined is a null value in the English language sense even if it's not the specific value null. Oct 7, 2021 at 14:05
  • Yes, similarly the term (and tag) for ?? is [nullish-coalescing]
    – Bergi
    Oct 7, 2021 at 14:27

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