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I’ve found a question that has many upvotes but it doesn’t fit Stack Overflow guidelines, so why hasn’t it been moderated?

How do you disable browser autocomplete on web form field / input tags?

The question doesn’t fit many Stack Overflow guidelines, like described here: https://stackoverflow.com/help/closed-questions

  • This question is not focused, and can have many valid answers
  • It doesn’t have any code example
  • Answers to this question, can lead to opinionated discussion.
  • It doesn’t address any specific problem
  • It is duplicated question
  • OP didn’t make any research before asking - it’s trivial to find.
  • Doesn’t related to specific tool

Since it doesn’t match moderation guidelines, should this question be deleted?

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  • 8
    If it's duplicated, did you flag it as a duplicate? Oct 2 at 17:54
  • 15
    "it’s trivial to find" ... how do you know it was trivial 10 years ago when it was asked?
    – charlietfl
    Oct 2 at 17:55
  • 8
    Noooo! I use that post :( "It doesn’t have any code example"?!? That is not a requirement for a post here. It addresses problems of causing them for test cases. Research effort is not required for posting. But it can get you downvotes.
    – Scratte
    Oct 2 at 17:57
  • 2
    "not focused, and can have many valid answers" that's not the problem with question that need more focus, "It doesn’t have any code example" not every question needs one, "Answers to this question, can lead to opinionated discussion." also missing the point of (primarily) opinion-based, lack of research is not a close reason etc. Also, the timeline reveals it was moderated before. Why should it be deleted? Did you flag it for closure (needs just 15 rep)? Oct 2 at 17:57
  • 3
    So now that your original question was thoroughly debunked, you change your target question. Look, you're always going to be able to find questions that have slipped through the cracks; it happens. Flag them for closure. Do not bring up a meta post for each one. Oct 2 at 18:03
  • 2
    "It is off topic" How? It's clearly a programming question.
    – Ryan M
    Oct 2 at 18:05
  • @HereticMonkey I just gave this particular one as an example, to learn more about SO guidelines. Oct 2 at 18:05
  • 7
    @DmytroBrazhnyk To learn about the guidelines, you just have to spend time in the Help Center and on meta. A lot of time..
    – Scratte
    Oct 2 at 18:07
  • 1
    About code in posts, this is relevant: Is it always a good idea to demand the OP “post some code”?
    – Scratte
    Oct 2 at 18:09
  • 1
    Regardless of whether the linked question follows the guidelines, or not, I think you do have a valid point: if that exact question were to be posted today, it would be heavily downvoted for lack of effort, almost certainly closed for lacking focus, and very likely deleted. I understand it can be confusing why that's the case, but you have to get used to posts being treated differently today, than how they used to be treated a long time ago.
    – cigien
    Oct 2 at 18:23
  • @cigien That is what is the sad part. We're closing and deleting posts that are future pearls.
    – Scratte
    Oct 2 at 18:25
  • 6
    Editor's note: please do not invalidate existing answers and discussion by changing the reference post without asking a new question. I rolled the edit back. If you intend on continuing to invalidate the existing discussion, I have to warn you that after a series of rollbacks an automatic mod flag is raised. Alternatively, users often use one before that happens in anticipation of what is called a "rollback war". Oct 2 at 18:55
  • 5
    @DmytroBrazhnyk You changed the post to point to the disable browser autocomplete post, and that revision was answered. That's the revision you must now keep, since if you change it, you're invalidating an Answer. Also, I think you can no longer delete your post, since you now have an upvoted Answer on it. Deleting your post would be wasting the time and effort of the answerer.
    – Scratte
    Oct 2 at 19:48
  • 1
    @DmytroBrazhnyk but this is the correct interpretation of the rules. If you were given a contrary interpretation, you can point them here, to other prominent discussions about close reasons, or, in general, raise concerns about the behavior of a user (without making it a witch hunt). Just please do not attempt to throw other on-topic and prominent Q&As under the bus if you feel frustrated about being treated unfairly (which I suspect is the reason for this question). Oct 2 at 20:24
  • 2
    @DmytroBrazhnyk happy to oblige. Please do not forget that the website is a huge network (despite basically being kept sustained by a handful of dedicated volunteers), so there is, in general, no unified front - some users choose to willfully ignore rules (and should be called out for that), some try to twist them to serve their agenda (which is not helped by the company's stance on many issues being ambivalent), and some are just frustrated with a huge amount of crap we get every day (which you must've noticed in ~5 years here) and the company doing basically nothing to help out. Oct 2 at 21:02
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Let's go through the points one by one, shall we?

This question is not focused, and can have many valid answers

Please read on till the clarification given by the same help center: "but no way to determine which - if any - are correct". This close reason exists to avoid questions that aren't properly scoped from cluttering the knowledge base, not to shut down questions that "can have many valid answers". The scope issue also corresponds to the second meaning of the close reason: "includes multiple questions in one".

I think there is no need to clarify why "disable autocomplete in the major browsers" does not actually suffer from either of the problems covered by this close reason.

It doesn’t have any code example

It does not have to. We do not close posts just because they do not have a code example. But we do use the lack of an MCVE as an indicator of a potentially problematic post and thus, especially when a question is unclear, is a common advice given by users to the question askers.

If one of your posts (or you witnessed this happening) has been closed solely because it lacks a code example, please do bring this up as a standalone discussion, and we all can take a look at it - sometimes it does happen, but, in my honest opinion, it is a misuse of close vote privilege and should be called out.

Answers to this question, can lead to opinionated discussion.

Assuming that this is a shot at the question being "opinion-based", we do not close posts that can lead to an opinionated discussion either. We use this close reason to close posts that primarily attract answers based on opinion and thus cannot be falsified in a strict sense of the word.

Which is exactly what the same help center talks about a little bit further on (in the context of editing opinion-based questions into shape): "focus on a more fact-based line of questioning. If you see a way to do this, consider editing the question""

It doesn’t address any specific problem

Except when it does, specifically how to "disable autocomplete in the major browsers for a specific input". Being somewhat of an SME, I fail to see how this very common (I dare say trivial) task is not a specific problem. You will have to do better than just claiming that it is not.

It is duplicated question

When suggesting that something is a duplicate, the onus is on the suggesting party to provide the said duplicate the post should be closed against. It does not need to be an older target, just a better one - so if you can provide the target and be able to defend your position against scrutiny, we will gladly close this post as a duplicate of the proposed target.

OP didn’t make any research before asking - it’s trivial to find.

We do not require question askers to provide proof of their "sweat" before deciding whether the question should stay. The central question has always been: is this question a valuable addition to the knowledge base or not? If it is, it does not matter whether the asker wrote a thesis on the subject matter or is just too lazy to solve the problem themselves.

One also has to note that the post in question was asked in August 2008, also known as the very early days of Stack Overflow's existence. When building a knowledge base, you have to start somewhere, don't you think? To be able to close countless lazy and unthought-through questions against a great canonical you must allow it to be asked at least once.

Doesn’t related to specific tool

This point is the only one that makes sense but is also not an argument here because the premise regarding the question not being about a specific programming problem is false in the first place. Note that the help center lists topics that a given question can be about as a union and not as an intersection:

  • a specific programming problem, or
  • a software algorithm, or
  • software tools commonly used by programmers; and is
  • a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development
4
  • Is same all true about this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/6470651/… Oct 3 at 3:48
  • I do not see how this one is any different - programming problem? Check. No research? Does not need any, 'tis no close reason. Fact-based? Check. Doesn't have a code example? It is a "how to" question, it does not need one. Check. Duplicate? Probably, but it was asked nearly 11 years ago, same argument. Check. Note that it also went through a closure cycle in 2015 and stood the test of time either way. Why this specific question? Oct 4 at 1:35
  • 1
    Re "very early days of Stack Overflow's existence": It was during the private (closed) beta of Stack Overflow. Stack Overflow was launched to the public in the middle of September 2008. Oct 4 at 12:34
  • @PeterMortensen is this a PSA? I am a bit at a loss here - isn't it exactly what the "very early days of" mean (just checking I am not missing anything)? Oct 4 at 13:09
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I will also address some of the points:

This question is not focused, and can have many valid answers

The mere fact that something could have multiple valid answers doesn't prove that it's not focused. Unfocused questions are questions that have multiple questions at once, or questions that would require so much guidance for us to answer in full that it becomes infeasible (or undesirable) for us to answer.

It doesn’t have any code example

Answers to this question, can lead to opinionated discussion.

Again, the mere fact that there can be multiple opinions on the answer doesn't automatically mean that it's primarily opinion-based. Lots of great questions can have at least some degree of opinion in answers; as long as it's possible for answerers to back up their opinions with facts it's not a problem. The problem is when all answers are equally valid or it's no longer possible for people to defend their answers with facts.

It doesn’t address any specific problem

I disagree - I think that this is a practical, answerable question about a problem that people actually face when writing a web site.

It is duplicated question

It's a very early question, so if there are later questions on the same question they should probably be marked as duplicates of this one. It seems fundamentally unfair to close a question because other people asked duplicates of it.

OP didn’t make any research before asking - it’s trivial to find.

It was written 13 years ago (as of the writing of this answer), so it may not have been that trivial to find back then.

Doesn’t related to specific tool

It doesn't need to - it just needs to be a practical, answerable question about a programming problem that the OP actually faces (which this is). Questions about algorithms aren't necessarily about specific tools either, but they're still on-topic here.

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