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I'm a big fan of the main landing page, the filters and highlights are great for finding questions that you might be able to help answer.

My only real issue with it is that it doesn't always display the information about who asked the question, and instead will display information about who last tried to answer the question, or even worse, who last modified the question:

example of modified metadata

I can understand wanting to know who last answered the question, as if they have a high reputation you can maybe rule out the question as "may not need further input", but showing who last modified it makes no sense to me, their involvement is largely irrelevant.

On the other hand, who ASKED the question is absolutely relevant - or at least the information about their "reputation" is. With low reputation questioners, you go in knowing you may never receive any feedback on your contribution, and on some days you may prefer not to put the effort in. With high reputation questioners, there's (usually) a certain guarantee that the question will be well-considered, and any contribution you might make will get some kind of feedback.

My question is: Is there any way to make it so it only displays information about who asked the question? And if not, can it please be made so?

Alternatively, I would appreciate an explanation as to why anyone other than the "modifier" would be interested in seeing that a question was last modified by someone other than the original questioner.

Another example of this that completely blows my mind with how irrelevant it is in this context: I modified an answer

That's my name showing up on the landing page, and all I'd done on that question was edit my answer! Who is that information for, and how is it informing them? I wasn't aware that sometimes the "modified" thing is about the answers as well. It's like they've got an audit log for each Question and they're displaying a subset of the information from the latest entry.

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    This sounds like a good use case for a userscript.
    – Ryan M
    Sep 18 at 6:36
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    Userscript at wikipedia. It's just like an extension, only you just have one extension and it fires all the scripts for you. I'm not even sure it's possible to keep sane here without using them :) Stack Exchange even has its own script store at Stack Apps :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 18 at 7:07
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    It would be preferable if it was implemented by Stack. However, if you search for the tag feature-request, you'll find that more often than not, Stack doesn't. Sometimes they do it within 6-8 time units, in the most common range of months to years. So if this is something you really want.. ;)
    – Scratte
    Sep 18 at 7:17
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    That is a very good question, and I have no idea why there's no button to view that information instead. It annoys me that I get last activity on the "Question" tab on user profiles too. I'm usually only interested in when they posted the Question, not when someone posted an Answer or edited it. Feel free to drop into the Userscript newbies and friends chat room :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 18 at 7:32
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    Well, if you are checking many questions each day a bookmark for all you find even a little interesting would not be very useful. As to the modifier it makes sense to show their name since their modification caused the bump. Also don't discount edits so much an edit just may improve the post significantly (or deface it wildly). And to be fair the user and their reputation should not be that important when opening the question. Sep 18 at 7:48
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    I think your view of how this site is suppose to work is off. A Question is like a dictionary entry. So what if the poster doesn't come back? The entry is there and it needs to be answered. Other users should find it when they need it. That's the point. It was never the intention to be a help desk where you help one person and then that's it. And you shouldn't delete your Answers just because the "entry-maker" doesn't show up again.
    – Scratte
    Sep 18 at 8:04
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    I get "stray votes" on Answers that I posted a long time ago. Some people get accepts on Answers they posted years ago. I'll comment on an old Answer and ask for clarifications or point out an inconsistency even if I have no stake on the thread myself. As long as you post something that you vouch for, don't delete it :) Your effort could help someone. Maybe that someone has an account and vote on it, but maybe they don't. To me it doesn't matter that much. I know I put something there that may be useful to others :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 18 at 8:15
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    Also keep in mind that the substantial majority of visitors can't interact with your posts in any way which will notify you. Logged-out users and users with < 15 reputation can't actually upvote, let alone leave a comment (50 rep) or downvote (125 rep). [Edit to clarify: question askers can comment on their question and any answers to their question, regardless of their reputation (and an an answer author can comment on their answer). In this comment, I was talking about the future visitors for which we are making this repository of questions and answers.]
    – Makyen Mod
    Sep 18 at 16:15
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    @CallumMorrisson I was trying to point out that the vast majority of users who visit the site and who, potentially, benefit from your (everyone's) answers are unable to interact with your answers in a way which notifies you.
    – Makyen Mod
    Sep 18 at 22:58
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    [Such visitors can still click on upvoting and downvoting, but those "votes" are recorded separately and are not easily seen.] However, that doesn't mean that those visitors aren't getting benefit from answers, even old answers which have little or no interaction from the original asker. In fact, the primary purpose of Stack Overflow, and the entire Stack Exchange network, is to generate a repository of questions and answers which are helpful to future visitors. That the answers we write also help the person who asked them is an additional benefit, but it's not primary.
    – Makyen Mod
    Sep 18 at 22:58
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    "With high reputation questioners, there's (usually) a certain guarantee that the question will be well-considered, and any contribution you might make will get some kind of feedback." - that's way too optimistic. Sep 19 at 8:42
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    Folks, we've been over this before - in general, we do not close feature requests as duplicates of old ones, especially with such a lackluster interaction over the years. Moreover, we are not required to close against an older target, older does not mean better. If anything, the old one should be closed against this one. I voted to reopen. Sep 20 at 10:34
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    @OlegValter "we've been over this before" Could you clarify where? An existing question on the subject does not seem validate your stance, or that it should be applied in general. Sep 20 at 15:37
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    @E_net4 I've successfully argued against closing towards an older feature request several times that would've effectively killed them, and that's what I've been referencing. Here is a Q&A with an opposite stance that supports mine. I do not think that every feature request is a precious snowflake and needs to be open, I am against closing against whatever just because it has been asked 6-8 years ago. We need better targets, not older targets. Sep 20 at 15:53
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    I mean, I am not opposed to having a better question for hosting a feature request, @OlegValter. My point is that the ruling of "not closing feature requests as duplicates of old ones" is still not that general, and should be decided based on the quality of new and existing questions. Moreover, it isn't always clear from the beginning of a question's lifetime whether it will become overall better than existing ones. The system played its role, but it takes time. All of this to conclude that we can propose to change the canonical duple target with a bit more tranquility. Sep 20 at 16:03
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but showing who last modified it makes no sense to me, their involvement is largely irrelevant.

If someone edited a Q/A and that edit is irrelevant then that someone shouldn't have edited that Q/A in the first place. We expect all contributed content to be relevant.

It is crucial these edits get surfaced so those that care about their tags can evaluate new additions.
Your edit can salvage an unclear answer, and due to that I might want to reverse votes, or it improved the question so much that I can now answer it.

To answer your questions:

  • Is there any way to make it so it only displays information about who asked the question?
    No, there is not. We deem those events too important to be easy to miss. Install a Userscript manager in your browser and either find or create a userscript that hides / removes / replaces that info for you.
  • Can it please be made so?
    No, let's not remove crucial curation events from plain sight as that will make maintaining our knowledge base of quality content more difficult.
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    @CallumMorrisson that edit removed meta noise from your question which is highly relevant and not superfluous. I assume we both agree that we can't have the system decide that an edit didn't change the intent of the question. Still, it might be that a visitor previously was unsure if your question was asked on the right place and your own expressed hesitation lead to them moving on, instead of providing an answer. With the edit they might circle back and feel empowered now to provide an awesome answer that might even support your point of view.
    – rene
    Sep 18 at 8:51
  • Do know that the landing page algorithm uses your historic use of the site (activity data, see your settings page on your profile) to provide you with the best possible personal tailored matches for interesting posts.
    – rene
    Sep 18 at 8:55
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    @CallumMorrisson No, a comment is never, ever a better way to fix content. And they not only removed EDIT. Please don't make it sound like the editor did something incorrect. They improved the post for future, that is all that counts. How the original OP feels about and edit is irrelevant.
    – rene
    Sep 18 at 9:10
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    Why is it so important that we know that the question has been edited? Sep 19 at 0:26
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    @SomethingDark from my answer: It is crucial these edits get surfaced so those that care about their tags can evaluate new additions. Your edit can salvage an unclear answer, and due to that I might want to reverse votes, or it improved the question so much that I can now answer it.
    – rene
    Sep 19 at 5:38
  • If someone edited a Q/A and that edit is irrelevant then that someone shouldn't have edited that Q/A in the first place. We expect all contributed content to be relevant. Formatting, fixing grammar, remove noise are useful edits, but aren't relevant to the question itself, which is what I understood OP meant as irrelevant edit, so your phrase is wrong in this sense.
    – Magnetron
    Sep 20 at 19:41
  • @Magnetron formatting, grammer and noise reduction are curating aspects that sets us apart from forums and other sites and so for me that is relevant. But I'm fine with dividing edits into relevant to the question asked and relevant overall. Doesn't change much for my perspective.
    – rene
    Sep 20 at 19:46
  • Yes, I agree with your perspective that the home page shoudn't be modified, it was just that sentence that didn't seem right to me, according to my understand of what OP meant.
    – Magnetron
    Sep 20 at 19:54
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showing who last modified it makes no sense to me, their involvement is largely irrelevant.

It does make sense to me as this provides information as to why the question is appearing at all on top of the list, be it the question was just asked by someone or it is resurfacing for some reason and you want to know why.

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If you want to only see who asked each question, you can go to Questions and sort by Newest. That always shows who the asker is and when the question was asked.

As for the Home page, I think adding the Newest sort to Top Questions makes more sense than changing what information is shown on lists that sort by recent activity.

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