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I've noticed that a simple way to earn reputation is by answering easy questions. Even if I don't know the answer to a question it will often be very similar to another question or only take a few minutes of research. For duplicate questions I have the option of flagging the post, but with the current system it seems like I'm incentivized not to.

My first question is: Why do we reward users for answering bad questions?

Especially since the question quality will continue to decline as long as we continue to reward the bad questions with answers.

One logical explanation is that giving people a little grace when it comes to question quality encourages new users to continue contributing to the community, but is this worth allowing a large number of similar questions (which likely have less comprehensive answers) to dilute the question pool?

The irony is that earning privileges that help to improve question quality on the site like downvoting and casting close votes takes a lot longer for a new user if they simply flag every thoughtless question rather than giving an answer. There are some great resources on site etiquette (like this one) that advise against answering and asking bad questions, but it seems like there isn't enough in the way of built in features that discourage this behaviour.

Which brings me to my second question:

Would it be a good idea to incentivize downvoting or flagging bad questions when the downvote or flag is deemed to be helpful using reputation?

Just to be clear, I am NOT wondering whether or not we should incentivize downvoting or flagging ANSWERS to bad questions. It is also apparent that a feature like this could potentially be abused, so there would have to be a system in place to prevent this (eg. only the first flag or downvote on a closed question is rewarded).

Alternatively:

Would it be helpful to make earning downvoting and close vote privileges easier?

Would love to know the community's thoughts on this.

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    be careful not to equate "easy" questions with "bad" questions. some of the most useful Q/A pairs on the network are "easy" questions.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 14 at 19:29
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    "Would it be a good idea to incentivize helpful downvotes and flags using reputation?" You mean one could earn reputation by downvoting? Or flagging?
    – Scratte
    Sep 14 at 19:32
  • 40
    @Bdeering I'm sorry, but that is a horrible idea. Giving reputation point for downvoting is going to make people downvote things that are fine.. because people do just about anything for reputation points. The amount of flags that will be raised on post where they should have never been raised will skyrocket and everybody will be doing busywork..
    – Scratte
    Sep 14 at 19:44
  • 13
    @Scratte Which is why it wouldn't be a good idea to give out reputation indiscriminately for flags and downvotes. There would have to be a system in place which determines if a downvote/flag is helpful. For example: if a post is flagged as duplicate and ends up being removed, the person who flagged the post could be rewarded. I've updated my question to make this a little clearer.
    – Bdeering
    Sep 14 at 19:51
  • 6
    But.. then I'd just both flag it, cast a downvote, and cast a delete vote on it. Then my flag is more likely to get validated. I think you're underestimating what people will do to get reputation points. There's recently been issues with selling them for actual money.
    – Scratte
    Sep 14 at 20:05
  • 38
    Regardless of anything else in the post, "The irony is that earning privileges that help to improve question quality on the site like downvoting and casting close votes takes a lot longer for a new user if they simply flag every thoughtless question rather than giving an answer." is an excellent observation.
    – zcoop98
    Sep 14 at 20:32
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    I just wish we would finally make closing as a duplicate the preferred action instead of a way to lose out on easy points. I mean it, by the time I type the question into Google (our own search engine is terrible) it will have 3 upvotes and 3 answers all circle-voting one another. The close-as-duplicate ages away and we are left with yet another question explaining async coding that will never be roomba'd.
    – zero298
    Sep 15 at 0:12
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    On a more on-topic note, @Bdeering, we should incentivize curation but please do not suggest reputation-based rewards, it's going to be a sh*t-show (as it already is with answering anything just to gain rep). Curators of the network have been begging for a merit-based system of privileges for ages - like "suggest 500 approved edits -> gain unilateral edit privileges" or "successfull flag for closure 200 times -> gain VTC privilege" (numbers are completely random here) Sep 15 at 3:46
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    @ChristopherHamkins Please explain how duplicating answers to common questions helps anybody, versus generating noise. I'll wait.
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 15 at 9:44
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    @ChristopherHamkins "Google will still have no problem finding the really good questions and answers" - (x) doubt. I've hit walls with low-quality dupe questions with awful answers, not closed at all far more times than I should have. Google does eventually choke on answers thanks to the rise of both the "duplicate answer good"-brigade, and the "closing bad"-brigade. Those two together are slowly causing a decline in the efficiency of Stack Overflow, by allowing arbitrary quality dupes all over the place. Finding canonicals isn't nearly as easy anymore
    – Zoe Mod
    Sep 15 at 9:59
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    One way to eliminate duplicates and still help inexperienced users learn would be to allow a reference to the duplicate question be added as an answer with a flag that simultaneously marks the question as a duplicate. The answer should explain why the other question is a duplicate in terms that the OP can understand. This would add incentive to mark duplicates while still helping people and being respectful. Sep 15 at 12:03
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    Sooooo many high-rep users answering obvious duplicates instead of closing them...
    – Matsemann
    Sep 15 at 13:37
  • 6
    @Matsemann is correct - I don't mind much that a low rep user answers a question that's been answered plenty of times before, but the high rep users who should know better - I see it all the time, and though I don't care all that much it's still somewhat annoying. And low quality questions too (high or near unity probability of being homework). You know what I'd like to see? A penalty for answering dupes or homework question that is a percentage of the answerer's rep! (Or is that just vindictive ...)
    – davidbak
    Sep 15 at 16:36
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    I find myself very often aligning with @Oleg's thoughts. I am in favor of progressively decoupling privileges from reputation. We should also stop celebrating people who have more than 1M rep points, because this is fuelling the worst offenders doing the worst job of curating content (which they are VERY capable of doing well). The Mortarboard badge is another stimulator of bad contribution habits -- it disincentivizes the art for of carefully and patiently hunting for duplicates. Sep 16 at 1:58
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    Would it be an idea to have an answer embargo during the first 10 minutes after a question is asked? This would increase the chance to get a duplicate question closed before any answers are posted, and those inclined to answer such questions would be more inclined to look for duplicates instead. Or alternatively, when a question is closed within 10 minutes, all answers to it are deleted with it, reverting any reputation gained from them.
    – trincot
    Sep 16 at 8:59
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Your post hits on a very real imbalance on Stack Overflow: curating content, which maintains the quality of this site, isn't rewarded well in comparison to creating that content.

Before I address your questions directly, I want to acknowledge this "balance", because it's really, really important for Stack Overflow as a whole (and frankly, for most platforms). Specifically, I mean: the more incentive you put on a given (positive) thing, the more you also make that thing an abuse vector.

In other words, lets say we started rewarding, for example, 10 reputation points (1 upvote's worth) for each time you flag/ vote to close a question which goes on to be closed. It's pretty easy to see that this could lead to abuse if not implemented correctly; I could build a bot that uses its 10 daily flags on 10 random new questions a day, and since closure-flags rarely (never?) get "declined", my bot could foreseeably earn some very quick reputation with nearly no repercussions.

Would one bot cause problems? Not really, but if you scale that effect up, it very well could cause problems. We're in pretty bad shape if a large group of users suddenly started flagging as poorly as they wrote their first posts...

All that to say– any solutions put forth towards the specific balance problem here on Stack Overflow need to take this concept into account, because it's crucial to the overall health of the platform, and a major misstep could genuinely damage or destroy the community in a very real, non-sensationalist way.

The best solutions to these problems will be the right balance between minimizing abuse and encouraging good behavior.

Onto the real questions!

Why do we reward users for answering bad questions?

I think the answer to this is that Stack Exchange has taken the stance that content creation should take precedence over content curation. The opening paragraph of the site tour says "we're working together to build a library of detailed answers to every question about programming", and the call to action at the end of the tour is to "Find a question to answer, or ask your own".

I'm not sure I even disagree with this stance; the curation part of Stack can only occur when we have people around to ask and to answer and otherwise generate said content to curate.

A side effect of this stance, however, is that by rewarding and emphasizing content creation over curation, there will almost inevitably be an emphasis on answering rather than closing or flagging, even when a question is garbage.

Would it be a good idea to incentivize downvotes and flags that are deemed to be helpful using reputation? Or to make earning downvoting and close vote privileges easier?

There has been much discussion in the past about how to get people to downvote more, and this answer by @Eevee (to a different discussion) does a great job covering the shortcomings of what we currently award rep for. I do think that reputation rewards need to be adjusted to better incentivize curation tasks; it's a major miss in my eyes that review tasks, for example, are so poorly rewarded.

For downvotes, I think the most obvious and justified change would be to remove the 1 point penalty for downvoting answers. Obviously that serves to guard against infinite, unwarranted downvotes, but given that downvotes remain incredibly underutilized overall, I'd be really interested to see if that would become a real problem. It's frankly dumb that you can unlock the downvote privilege at 125 rep, and then promptly lose it again by using it on answers... Experimentation and caution on Stack Exchange's part would definitely be warranted here, but I think this would be a net-positive change to make.

For flags, I'm more on the fence. It's definitely a curation tool, and helpful flags are definitely a Good Thing™; it just feels wrong to me to reward flags that aren't quality-related.

For example, it would be a pretty nasty side effect if rewarding all helpful flags encouraged witch hunts for users with borderline content in posts (especially on other network sites, where discussion is about much less clean-cut content than programming concepts). I think rewarding closures, especially duplicate closures, could be very beneficial, but flags as a whole sound dicier.

Something you didn't suggest, but which I would love to see in the conversation, is reputation rewards for reviews. This would also have to be implemented with extreme caution; the audit system was created specifically to combat "robo-reviewers" that review sloppily and quickly in the pursuit of review badges. If actual reputation was thrown into the mix, this could bring an even worse version of the same effect. It's possible that we'd be able to find a number that avoided these issues, but which was still something... I'd really like to see this get talked about more in-depth at some point. The discussion so far is pretty uninspiring, and is fairly dated at this point.

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    I'd be a fan of rewarding duplicate closure, it answers the question just like an answer (Or even better if there are multiple answers) but just is how the site works correctly. If I want to gain Rep, closing as duplicates takes work looking for a good one and possibly interacting with edits/comments but doesn't get me anything out of it. Rewarding flagging as a whole would be really hard to balance, if I had 1 rep per helpful flag I'd be at 5000+ immediately, which would just be ridiculous. And if I could review FA, FQ and LA to "farm" (where no consensus is needed) it'd also be too much.
    – LW001
    Sep 15 at 7:10
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    If curation tasks were "rewarded" I would be very interested to see if certain ([very] high rep) users that I am aware of that don't curate do start curating. :)
    – Larnu
    Sep 15 at 8:03
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    @Larnu I'd be very interested in seeing those users permabanned. If you don't curate you're not contributing to the Stack Overflow community as a whole, you're just farming rep.
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 15 at 9:01
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    I don't think that's a good idea, @IanKemp . What really needs to happen, in my opinion is they need to be educated on how wrong their understand of the site is, and then, if they don't follow that education, repercussions should occur (answer ban? Rep loss? Answer deleted?) The problem, however, is that the only way to educate them would likely be via meta, or a mod DMing them; and then we need vigilante curators (like ourselves?) to be both aware they've been "educated" and flag when they aren't following that education. That is a can of worms unto itself.
    – Larnu
    Sep 15 at 9:40
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    @Larnu Desperate times require desperate measures.
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 15 at 9:45
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    @IanKemp another thing that annoys me is that the association bonus doesn't even allow downvoting. But it does allow upvoting. So, users who land on a question via the HNQ would be able to upvote posts even if they aren't familiar with the site's rules. At the same time users who land on a question via the HNQ would not be able to downvote posts even if they are familiar with the site's rules. It's odd.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 15 at 11:00
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    @VLAZ As explained in my answer, it's because bad actors were never considered when designing the SE software. Which, for me, is an incredible oversight that significantly dulls my impression of the initial founders of SE Inc.
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 15 at 11:01
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    @IanKemp well, it might be that when you found something like SO as a sort of beacon of light, you tend to think of people higher than they actually are :) Most likely the case here - I think your answer strikes close to the truth there Sep 15 at 11:14
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    @Larnu "vigilante curators" :) we need a 6-shooter badge.
    – Dale K
    Sep 16 at 20:42
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    @IanKemp That would probably get a few 1m rep (or close to) users banned. Which might actually be a good idea, at least as a warning shot... Sep 16 at 20:57
  • These comments are highly amusing; the thought of improving the site by removing even more content creators. No where else in a situation of curation will you find such a suggestion. The mere thought of a gallery curator kicking artists out for focusing on creating art should highlight the absolute absurdity of the outlook portrayed by some in comments here. If you want to find such outlook in an answer, simply scroll to the very bottom of the page, in the downvoted section, where this type of outlook always ends up.
    – Travis J
    Sep 17 at 17:25
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    @TravisJ I think you misunderstand the frustration felt by those expressed here; if an artist was contributing works to a gallery that were unwelcome or unfitting to that gallery, I don't at all see why there would be any dilemma whatsoever in said artist(s) getting kicked out or directed to contribute elsewhere.
    – zcoop98
    Sep 17 at 17:29
  • @zcoop98 - I understand this situation just fine, thank you; and I most certainly understand the "frustration" of the meta soapbox echo chamber that is currently status quo. I am not sure who you think I am referring to by "content creators", but to be explicit, I am talking about users who post actual answers here that solve problems. This whole endeavor is about solving problems and recording it while doing so... or it was about that. The answer to question rate is already abysmal. The exchange is in a sad state of affairs now, and as evidenced by these comments, is only further degrading.
    – Travis J
    Sep 17 at 17:34
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    @TravisJ just chiming in, as usual, with an "incorrect analogy" warning: comparing answerers to "artists" is a huge stretch of imagination. And calling most answers "art" is an even bigger stretch. Even if we are going to use the analogy, gallery curators will refuse to accept utter trash of submissions. Not to mention that they do not have to deal with several thousand "artists" a day most of whom can barely articulate their thoughts, be bothered to at least split their "art" into comprehensible sentences, or read that the exhibition they submitted a photo to asked for paintings. Sep 17 at 17:35
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    @TravisJ am I missing out on a witty joke? :) I do not remember ever being banned. Don't get me wrong, I am not defending the position, I just wouldn't call answerer in general "artists", methinks there is really too generous of you to compare. Yes, there are nice submissions, and yes, some are borderline art, but en masse, they aren't. Plus, there are different 1M rep users, some of which definitely do more harm then good by completely and intentionally ignoring any curation in favor of their "artwork" which is not as "high-quality" as it might seem at first glance. Sep 17 at 17:50
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The problem isn't necessarily that people are answering these questions, it's that they never go away. An answer certainly works against that since generally a "correct" answer even to a bad question will receive at least 1 upvote, making the whole thing ineligible for auto-deletion by the roomba.

Downvoting these answers isn't... correct. The answer is often both correct and useful, it just... won't be visible to future users who need it due to problems with the question. Ideally... the question would be edited, improved, fixed such that it'd be a useful question, but... if that were happening with enough frequency, we wouldn't be having this discussion.

This is a problem that has existed for as long as the network has. I don't have a solution, but I do know that simply throwing more downvotes at the problem is unlikely to actually do anything useful.


What's effectively happened with SO is we've outsourced the "quality" metric that people actually use to find questions to a 3rd party, Google. It's near impossible to find anything on SO if you don't know what it is you're looking for, and even then it can be incredibly difficult. Why can't we base the "usefulness" of content on similar metric? Why can't we take the number of views something is getting over a certain period and whether or not someone used the content from the page and use that to determine if the question should exist and/or how relevant it is to the search, regardless of whether or not it got an upvote? The more junk you throw into a box, the harder it is to find anything at all within the box regardless of how many stars you put on each item.

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    "Downvoting these answers isn't... correct" - I agree with you there, and I just made an edit to my question. My solution has more to do with encouraging users to weed out bad questions rather than answering them.
    – Bdeering
    Sep 14 at 19:46
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    Taking the views as a metric to a posts usefulness may be valid for some posts. But for others, it's not even close to being a good metric. Low traffic tags or issues that only come once in a blue moon, but when one faces it, the fact there is a post on Stack is just a life-saver even if it only has 10 views in 10 years. Stack's strength is variety. Any programming problem, no matter how odd or unusual.
    – Scratte
    Sep 14 at 19:54
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    Sure, but low views doesn't have to equal delete. It very well could simply be a search improvement.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 14 at 19:55
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    What i'm sayiing is there's a wealth of data available that's just not being used. We could even take into account anonymous voting and voting from registered users without enough rep, that pool of users casts a way larger percentage of downvotes than regular users do, but none of them count for anything. I'd argue that group of users are the least biased group of votes and are likely the purist form of quality measurement we have.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 14 at 19:57
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    I don't disagree that some post are really not very useful. Most of those are common debugging problems. They have all the metrics for passing curation, but they're unlikely to be useful to anyone other than the poster, and maybe not even them. Those posts may obscure the search results. I agree that the value of votes from anonymous users are wasted into oblivion. But how can we really use them? I could potentially downvote stuff where I don't like the poster from all my friends computers while not signed in.
    – Scratte
    Sep 14 at 20:01
  • first and foremost they could never be used to affect reputation directly. they could be used to help inform the roomba and search algorithms
    – Kevin B
    Sep 14 at 20:03
  • The sad reality is, search is hard. It's easy from the outside to say "Hey, weight the results based on views!" but... on the inside, what does that really mean? the root problem is still there, most questions have awful titles, and if you can't even get a relevancy search to work because the answer you need was presented on an X/Y problem or a debugging problem from someone who hasn't learned to debug that doesn't even begin to actually describe the problem they have in a way that'd be useful to future users... what good will weighting do? we're left in the same situation: bad questions.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 14 at 20:18
  • A tutoring system to help new users learn how to ask good questions would be great addition going forward, but it doesn't fix the existing mess
    – Kevin B
    Sep 14 at 20:22
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    We could implement a Question-stop until the mess is fixed :D ..yeah, that's never going to happen :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 14 at 20:30
  • @KevinB 's comments gave me an idea. Tags on questions serve multiple purposes, as it is now - and one of those is, to classify the desired focus of the answers. algorithm tags usually indicate, someone is looking for a better algorithm, not some simple bug in their code. So why not factor such things out of the tags and give another set of options to classify a question by the author: Examples: "Code Bug" "Algorithm" "Tool chain problem", "Better ideas?" ,... Then, people browsing questions could filter better and the author would more likely get better answers more quickly.
    – BitTickler
    Sep 15 at 7:57
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    @BitTickler "algorithm tags usually indicate, someone is looking for a better algorithm, not some simple bug in their code." I don't think this is a fair assessment. There are plenty of cases where the author is implementing a known algorithm but it does not work. It's also misused many times because the author just sees it as "something to do with code" while trying to add as many tags as possible.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 15 at 8:06
  • @BLAZ "runtime error", "does not compile", "incorrect output" etc. is one class of questions, "my algo implementation is not working", "is there a better algo" are other classes of questions. My idea is to separate this kind of classification from the tags. Even if the one example I picked might not be the best example. And there is always noise and unclear reasoning - even with tags as they are (Just count how many use "C++" tag when they just write "C" or vice versa - or complaints about the "C++" tag because the code in the question uses stdio... But that noise does not invalidate the idea.
    – BitTickler
    Sep 15 at 8:19
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    What about duplicates that still attract answerers looking for low hanging fruit? Most of the time their answers are just regurgitations of existing older answers in certain tags. To me, that's a downvote regardless of whether I've flagged the question as a duplicate or not.
    – user692942
    Sep 15 at 10:31
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    There's nothing wrong with keeping them forever. Storage is cheap. Sep 16 at 5:52
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    @kevinkrumwield storage isn’t the issue, as I’ve explained in my answer.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 16 at 13:37
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I believe this question embodies a false premise, namely that those users who do not uphold Stack Overflow's principles of curation are instead merely interested in whoring for points.

But I believe there is another category, not nearly so mercenary: users who do not uphold Stack Overflow's principles of curation because they are more interested in helping people.

Stack Overflow's founding principle is to curate a database of good answers to good questions, and if incidentally it can help individual OP's, that's a useful side effect.

But there are plenty of people — myself included — for whom helping the individual OP's is the primary motivation. If along the way I contribute to the database, or pick up some reputation points, those are the side effects.

So, yes, even though I do regularly close questions as duplicates, I will sometimes also go and compose a fresh answer to a dup-ey looking question. Sometimes this is because I think the OP would be better served by a more tailored answer. Sometimes it's simply because composing a fresh answer takes less time than finding a truly appropriate existing answer. But it's never because I'm angling for a couple of measly rep points.

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    Your position is understandable and I wouldn't criticise you for it - everyone is allowed to have their own motivations. I suppose the issue here is that by giving someone short-term help, you a) may not be helping them in the long term, b) may be making it more difficult for other people to access help in the future. So in that sense, it may be a narrow view of what constitutes helping someone.
    – user438383
    Sep 17 at 13:06
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    I don't want to challenge this answer, yet I feel it's important to point out that "uphold Stack Overflow's principles" and being "more interested in helping people" is not something that is necessarily a conflict. As someone who finds most of their answers on SO without asking a question – because someone else asked and curators ensured it was generally useful – I am indeed convinced that upholding SO's principles does help people. Sep 17 at 13:12
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    There's yet another category of people who don't particularly care about points and aren't that excited about helping people, who just enjoy answering questions. Sep 17 at 16:55
  • "Stack Overflow's founding principle is to curate a database of good answers to good questions, and if incidentally it can help individual OP's, that's a useful side effect." This isn't correct. It was both, and mostly, it was helping the individual programmer.
    – Travis J
    Sep 20 at 19:04
5

There seems to be a general conception of viewer over asker with regards to historical precedence of how this system was designed.

I would just like to put some quotes out there that at least contribute to understanding what the design mentality was:

Atwood: Let's create something that makes it easy to participate, and put it online in a form that is trivially easy to find.

Spolsky: Stack Overflow is a site where questions get asked and answered.

Spolsky: We designed our site with the assumption that our homepage is Google.

Spolsky: StackOverflow fills a niche that those books don't fill, which is namely the immediate gratification that we expect of programming: You have a problem and you want an answer to that problem. And that's what StackOverflow is really about.

Spolsky: But you see StackOverflow is not for the humble developer. It is for the arrogant developer who hasn't bothered to RTFM and is now looking things up because he thinks he is so hot shit that he doesn't have to learn the programming language before he starts banging away code and now he's run into a problem and he's asking people how to append to lists ...

The design for Stack Overflow is unique, in that it was fully documented in multiple places: Joel's blog, Jeff's blog, and a series of conversations which they had that was recorded via podcast. The transcripts of the podcast are here https://stackoverflow.fogbugz.com/?W4, and you can also look at joelonsoftware or codinghorror for more from Joel and Jeff respectively.

The point being made here, through these quotes and by showing the sources so you can dig in for yourself, is that Stack Overflow was not designed as some sort of library - there is no "pool of questions" there is only the internet, and the site was designed to let Google guide you (90% of traffic comes from Google). Stack Overflow was designed to get problems solved, as quickly as possible, and if that meant asking then it was to be done with as little barriers as possible. Solutions come in the form of answers, and the site was and is heavily weighted towards generating answers. If it meant finding a solution, the intent with tags, votes, and dates, was to build a clear picture for page rank to determine a clear and high value target to suggest as a search result.

So, if you see too many answers, that is by design. That certain questions which you may personally disagree with get an answer is merely the byproduct of this machine working to generate an answer from any input.

Unfortunately, the discourse of labeling answers as problematic (such as this question itself) has had a direct and measurable effect on Stack Overflow (from certain features resulting from such discourse), in the negative direction. Whereas the exchange used to generate multiple answers per question, now it is far fewer; and what is more troubling is that not only are questions generating less answers individually, on a whole the exchange is severely struggling with generating any answers to questions, with the answer to question rate dropping steadily.

I have said this for years, so I don't know why I even write these anymore, but blaming answerers to solve issues with questions is the wrong direction to go. If you want to make actual progress, then address the inability of the software to predict duplicates while asking (this is a huge and unsolved problem) and remove unvaluable question vectors (granulate the close reasons). These two things alone will cut out accidental repeat questions and give more power to community moderation, thus culling out a large swath of low quality questions.

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    At the beginning of reading this answer I didn't agree with where you were going, but here at the end I really agree strongly with your main points. The problem of getting answers to problematic questions can't be fixed by labeling them as problematic, it has to be fixed by, you know, dealing with the problematic questions. We absolutely need to improve the mechanisms used to lead question authors to existing duplicates (before they ask), and we unquestionably need to improve the guidance given to authors of closed questions (and frankly, the closure workflow as a whole needs work). +1
    – zcoop98
    Sep 20 at 22:08
  • 1
    Can you please put your last paragraph a bit closer to the top? :) I can only second zcoop98 here - I had to fight the urge to "I disagree" till the last one. Indeed, blaming answerers is not going to get us anywhere as long as the underlying system and software limitations stay in place. So many of our issues with bad posts could be solved with proper software upgrades (e.g. better preliminary quality checks)... Sep 20 at 22:33
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    I triple Oleg and zcoop - At first I was a millimeter away from the downvote button, but then I read your last paragraph and I upvoted. If people are writing answers to bad questions, we can't blame the answer writers. We need to deal with the bad questions.
    – 10 Rep
    Sep 21 at 20:58
3

Frame challenge

My first thought on this is: how do we quantify, without doubt, what makes a good vs bad question.

I've read many Meta questions and answers that go on long explanations that contradict themselves, others, this site, and generally don't answer anything except for the fact that "good vs bad" is still a highly opinionated thing. What is a perfectly good question to one person is a horribly bad question to another.

And all too often, the votes are based more on popularity of the topic, rather than the actual question. Personally, I've had my own questions downvoted and/or roombaed because people didn't like the idea that a question about the topic was even asked.

And there's always the possibility that a "bad" question can be made better by editing. I mean, that's one of the possibilities when choosing why to close a question.

There's also been significant discussion on Meta about how duplicates help with searches, by adding more vocabulary for search engines to notice and then funneling people to the "correct" question. Personally, I've found more useful answers on duplicates than on the "original", as well as plenty of "duplicates" that didn't actually seem like duplicates at all.

Should a new question be flagged as duplicate if the dupe target doesn't answer the original question?

Falsely duplicate question on stackoverflow

Reputable people keep answering duplicates - What's the solution?

Do not delete good duplicates!

Is there a possible hidden benefit to having many duplicates on Stack Overflow?

https://stackoverflow.blog/2010/11/16/dr-strangedupe-or-how-i-learned-to-stop-worrying-and-love-duplication/

There's not real consensus on what a bad question is, unless it's unequivocally a word-for-word duplicate, not in the language of the Stack, or something blatantly obvious. SO doesn't even give a good guideline besides some real, super basic ideas of what is or isn't a good question. I've seen people follow the "How To Ask" guidelines and still get and down close votes. This has happened to me more than once.

https://stackoverflow.com/help/duplicates

https://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask

So, before we start worrying about whether we should incentivize people for answer a "bad" question, how about we actually define what a bad Question is so there's no doubt it's bad?

The real answer is that we can't truly 100% define what a bad question, so trying to prevent people from answering those "questionable" questions is sort of like arguing about the shape of clouds and trying to prevent people from liking ones shaped like bunnies due to them all being shaped like bunnies.

The only way to prevent people from answering bad questions is to do something draconian, and frankly antithetical to a Q&A* forum like this site, like requiring that a X positive score be reached before any answers are allowed. Of course, this would prevent most questions from ever being answered and prevent most people from answering, since they wouldn't likely see it after it eventually reached X goal. I mean, how many people upvote a question then come back days or even hours later to answer it? I'd guess that's an insignificant number.

Also, I'm tempted to mark this question as a duplicate, since the answers on another question attempt to answer it.

Question quality is dropping on Stack Overflow

And yes, I've seen people argue that a question is a duplicate if the answers are roughly the same.

Answering "borderline duplicate" questions

So if this question is a duplicate, does that mean it's a bad question and we shouldn't have answered it?

*I can't find them anymore, but I've seen people argue (here on Meta) about whether SO is a Q&A site or something else.

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    I don't quite see how this answers the question. The question is about rewarding people for rating, not punishing people for being rated or even pre-emptively preventing them for possibly being rated. Sep 15 at 19:09
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    @MisterMiyagi, I question how we can avoid rewarding bad Q's if we can't even reliably identify the Q's as bad. And I never said anything about punishing anyone. Sep 15 at 19:11
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    Feel free to skip the "punishing" part and go ahead to the "preventing" part, then. Sep 15 at 19:17
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    We manage to reward "good" Qs even though we can't 100% reliably identify the Qs as good. Should we stop doing that as well? The entire point of SO's rating process is that we can't say what is good or bad up-front and must rely on experts to decide; that will never be 100% reliable, nor 100% rule based. Sep 15 at 19:22
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    @MisterMiyagi, that's exactly my point: if we can't 100% decide what's a bad Question, how can we prevent people from Answering them and getting rewarded for it? And if we have to wait for "experts" to rate a Q as good or bad, how do we ever get any Answers? Sep 15 at 19:26
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    This is an excellent observation - and one which I had planned to make but at a much less detailed level. There are many questions and answers that are clearly poor. Then there are plenty also that seem poor to some eyes but are justifiably decent to good questions . Sometimes the justifications are added and the "poor question" labels are lifted. Other times the labels remain: SOF is overall an excellent but not a perfect site since none of us who use it are perfect. Sep 15 at 19:27
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    @computercarguy Why would we prevent them from answering? None of the basic actions on SO rely on prevention, they are always about recovery after content is deemed low quality. So instead of prevention, we assume that people have a basic feeling of good/bad and then try to clean up the remainder as best as we can. With that in mind, again, why would we prevent them from answering? We can still withdraw a reward after content has been rated – just as it already happens for deletions, for example. Sep 15 at 19:33
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    @MisterMiyagi, I wonder how many Q's you've answered that have been closed. I'm sure removing RP after a close would negatively affect pretty much everyone here, but mostly high ranked users, like you. And what number represents "very negative": -3, -5, -10, -20, or something else? That's just another opinion to question it's validity. Also, if we start doing this and people start losing their reputation, they'll simply stop answering all Qs, except for the "obviously good" or old Qs, which basically is useless. Good Qs will get lots of attention on their own w/o fencing people into them. Sep 15 at 20:09
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    @computercarguy I would gladly give up tons of rep if it means the quality improves. Feel free to wonder how many Qs I've answered that have been closed, but don't think it's something to change my opinion with. Sep 15 at 20:19
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    I just checked the profile on @MisterMiyagi. There are 3 duplicates and 1 closed post on the first 5 pages. (I have a user script that puts the status after the title.) That's not a whole lot. But I think your point is valid. It's hard to tell at the time one posts an Answer.
    – Scratte
    Sep 15 at 20:24
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    @MisterMiyagi, I'm not interested in discussing specific votes, I'm showing examples of "bad" Qs that punch holes in the original Q or your suggestions on how to handle them. These "bad" Qs also show how subjective voting can be as well as how answering them, or not, as per the original question would also make it subjective. Not to mention how degraded answerers would be to find out that their rep was removed on Q closure. Sep 15 at 20:37
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    I think you are just completely missing the point. Identifying 9X? of bad questions does not mean 100% agreement by everyone who voted. It means the final rating decision was made - be that 5/3 close votes, net -3 score, or whatever a future rating will be - when it should have been. That there are people who would pry open or upvote every junk, that people have to learn, that there are borderline cases, that there is content which is neither good or bad does not mean we as a whole are incapable of rating what is bad - or good. Sep 16 at 5:50
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    No matter how deep you dig into the data, you won't find an XY% of how well we vote. Because the entire reason for voting is that we cannot automatically 100% reliably say what is good or bad. If we could, then we would not be voting - neither up or down. Sep 16 at 6:02
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    We close questions without 100% agreement. We delete content without 100% agreement. We rate content without 100% agreement. We flag content without 100% agreement. We review content without 100% agreement. There is absolutely no problem rating content as "good" or "bad" without 100% agreement. We already do that, all the time. Sep 16 at 16:14
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    I have literally no idea how you connect not rewarding answers to content rated as bad with throwing away half the site and mass censoring. Sep 16 at 16:29
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Why do we reward users for answering bad questions?

The site software doesn't, the law of unintended consequences does.

The Stack Overflow platform was designed well over a decade ago for an audience of people who care about quality, not reputation points. Therefore no rules or provisions were ever made for dealing with the type of bad actors that you're rightly concerned about. By the time it became clear such measures were necessary, the site's management had become more concerned with attracting new users (profits) than content quality, which means the chance of such measures ever being implemented is about as close to zero as it can possibly be without actually being zero. This includes appointing more moderators, or appointing them outside of the standard popularity vote mechanism.

Would it be a good idea to incentivize downvoting or flagging bad questions when the downvote or flag is deemed to be helpful using reputation?

No. This is either likely to only allow the bad actors to gain more reputation at the expense of quality, or will take so much time and effort from moderators and/or curators as to make it effectively useless (because nobody will bother doing so).

Would it be helpful to make earning downvoting and close vote privileges easier?

Unlikely. The number of users who curate the site is a significant minority of its total active users and there is little reason to believe that granting curation privileges earlier would meaningfully change that.


If all of the above seems incredibly pessimistic, that's because it is. Until or unless Stack Overflow's management starts to care about quality, there is very little that we as curators can meaningfully do to stem the flood of garbage content posted by people who value imaginary numbers more than anything else.

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    "content posted by people who value imaginary numbers more than anything else" - some people might be like that, but for others it's more about helping people (even if reputation also helps to further motivate them). The problem is that they care mostly about helping people in the short term while disregarding both what would help those people most in the long term as well as the guidelines and goals of Stack Overflow. (That's assuming you're talking about answerers; questioners generally care mostly about getting an answer.) Sep 15 at 17:40
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    Why even use a site owned by a private company who doesn't care about quality then? Start contributing to non-profit, open source communities instead. Where the community itself decides how the site should be.
    – Lundin
    Sep 16 at 6:09
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    @Lundin I have followed one instance of such a non-profit, open source community and revisit regularly, but I keep wondering why the people invested in it think that they have designed a set of rules and mechanisms that will scale up from one question a day to one question a second (or anything in between). I think this kind of community, or any community really, cannot scale while pleasing everyone, not even some.
    – CodeCaster
    Sep 16 at 9:10
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    @CodeCaster They won't scale up well at all as-is, obviously. But the more people who use the site, the more people will get active on meta as well, discussing posting rules, policies, moderation and so on. Nothing will please everyone, but if it pleases a majority, then that's probably as good as it gets for any Internet community. Notably, pleasing the community and pleasing shareholders are very different things. Remove the shareholders and the site can focus much better on building something for the long term.
    – Lundin
    Sep 16 at 9:36
-13

There is an old saying, that if a metric is in place long enough, people, who are subject to such a metric find a way to make it work in their favor. (Fun stories can be found all over the net... e.g. of companies who paid for "found bugs" in software and later found, that all that metric had accomplished was to create a bug-trade within their company (someone adds bugs on purpose for others to find them and get paid).)

My corollary to that saying is, that no metric is immune to being abused. Metrics are like simplified models of a real process (like a physics engine can be thought of as a "metric", giving feedback which is supposed to reflect the behavior of the real process, but - simplified as it is, it opens the door for people to "exploit the physics engine"). There are even old Minecraft stories, where people found clever ways to abuse the game logic for their own purposes (and found eventually that Minecraft was Turing complete and they could abuse it in any fathomable way. C++ templates could serve as another example :) ).

Stack Overflow reward and penalty system is no different. And of course, there are people who will want to abuse it. While a contributor's Stack Overflow score has no real world value, people will do what people will do. Just like people cheating on chess servers in various ways, some will always try to "excel" by "exploiting the mechanics".

So, whatever will come out of this topic, the above should be kept in mind. Closing one door opens 10 others.

Now, there are objectively bad questions, good questions, clumsily phrased, really good questions someone might flag because they do not understand the question's implications, product specific questions and people might flag them because they hate the company which did that product...

I have seen all of the above. And I often think, people are too quick with asking for a close of a question. And what bothers me, is the obvious mind set of those asking to close. They do not even spend 10 seconds thinking about the question. Many here do great - but some do not. So, giving those fast closer groups a reward is just as bad as keeping it as it is.

In general, I am in favor of anything which reduces the complexity of the Stack Overflow reward system and I am opposed to anything which increases the complexity of the reward system. The more complex it gets, the more likely it is, that new exploits are being introduced.

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    I don't get the downvotes: "incentivise" -> "metric change (new rules added)" -> new exploits -> bad. That is the summary of my answer. What's wrong with that?
    – BitTickler
    Sep 15 at 8:11
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    Some users didn't find the answer useful, that's all there is to it. This being a "hot meta question", it will get a fair amount of traffic, and more users expressing their opinions through votes. That's all.
    – yivi
    Sep 15 at 8:16
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    No, the summary of your answer is that you've entirely failed to answer the questions posed by the asker, and unsurprisingly people take issue with that, just like they would on SO.
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 15 at 8:54
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    I downvoted because I vehemently disagree that we need to make the systems simpler to get rid of exploits. We need better systems, not simpler systems. The sad fact is that reputation-based system suffers from the same flaws as "naive" capitalism does. Because wealth accumulation is completely orthogonal to quality. That's it. No amount of making it more/less complex is going to change it. I also found an attack on close voters in the second half of the post completely unnecessary and unwarranted ("the obvious mind set of those"). Sep 15 at 9:04
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    "And what bothers me, is the obvious mind set of those asking to close." You probably should consider to elaborate, reformulate, or remove this (and the containing paragraph). This looks like a rather one-sided view on people you frankly cannot claim to be speaking for. To give you an idea bout the mind set of this close voter: What bothers me are the countless questions that don't even need spending 10 seconds to think about. What bothers me are the pearls I can't spend time on because I never see them in all the sand… Sep 15 at 9:24
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    Stack Overflow doesn't have to accept all such questions. Or, perhaps more importantly, the question could be edited to meet site guidelines, or an improved version of it can be posted, which usually also makes it much more useful. Closure is partially intended for that goal (if this weren't the case, we'd just delete questions directly; there'd be no need to close them first). It's probably the reason I use most often to close questions, but many people who object to closure seem to think of it more like some sort of ultimate condemnation of the question instead of "hey, this needs to be edited". 2/2 Sep 15 at 19:48
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    @BitTickler [1] Re "I don't get the downvotes", you are not really addressing the issues raised in the OP. And with simplistic hyperbole such as "Closing one door opens 10 others." you are almost begging for downvotes. [2] Adding rules isn't automatically bad (or good). The rules needed should vary according to the complexity of the situation, and so your central argument makes little sense. And your stance seems especially odd coming from a software developer, where dealing with complex situations and edge cases is the norm.
    – skomisa
    Sep 15 at 20:03
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    @skomisa Especially because I am a software developer, I object "artifical" complexity. I give you an example from automotive industry where a certain german automotive company wants to have something like: "Next service in 2000km or 2 months." on a display and - in start contrast to other manufacturers uses close to 100 model parameters for oil aging modeling and tons of maths and complexity and 300 pages of specification. Others have like 5 pages and 5 model parameters and get the same end result. So yes - people telling me, it has to be complicated make me suspicious.
    – BitTickler
    Sep 16 at 5:50
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    As for "more rules -> bad". Does anyone here feel comfortable dealing with lawyers, laws, rules and regulations? The law system of modern western societies is a prime example of the "there is a loophole for everything" syndrome. So yes - I think making the reputation system rather simple than law-like complex is a good thing. So I did in fact answer the question of the OP with a question: Is such a feature worth it? In terms of making an already complex system even more complex? My opinion (and that is what I wrote) is a NO. Also, because people will try and make a rep-income out of it.
    – BitTickler
    Sep 16 at 5:57
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    @BitTickler That just seems like a slippery slope argument. We obviously need some complexity and there will always be people who exploit what complexity is there - as there currently already are, hence the question. A slippery slope isn't necessarily linear in real systems. Sep 16 at 6:06
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    @MisterMiyagi I wholeheartedly agree with the labeling of what I try to make people aware of with my answer as "slippery slope". Hoping you meant it as I understood it. And in my books, this is a valid objection. Let's not forget that the reputation number is just a little immaterial, symbolic token of "we appreciate your contribution" and no ones life depends on it. So why go down that slope?
    – BitTickler
    Sep 16 at 6:09
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    @BitTickler I mean it to reject your argument, so I doubt you understood it correctly. Adding complexity and making things worse don't necessarily go hand in hand, so the slope you are warning about is not necessarily there - IMO it is not. Rep might be a symbol and immaterial, yet it does motivate people - and in the situation this meta-Q is about, it motivates to contribute in a way that is not appreciated. Sep 16 at 6:24
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    @BitTickler "why go down that slope" - because the current system doesn't do what we want it to? Aside from a bit of nuance, the current reputation system is mostly: you get +10 rep for an upvote, -2 for a downvote, +15 for acceptance and nothing for moderation. That sounds rather simple if you ask me, so we have a long way to go before we get to a point where we need to start worrying about overcomplicating things. If we want to address the problem by instead making it simpler, the only way I see to do so would be to remove reputation for votes and acceptance, which would be quite extreme. Sep 16 at 12:38
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    @BitTickler "Does anyone here feel comfortable dealing with lawyers, laws, rules and regulations" - yes, I am. Rules, regulations and proper metrics are what make robust systems, not opportunistic approaches of early capitalism that were critiqued to death by people much smarter than me or you. Sep 16 at 12:48
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    @BitTickler I spent quite a while on the site, and did quite a bit of moderation, before I realised the way most approach asking, answering and moderating questions is (whether intentionally or accidentally) not at all conducive to helping people who come here through Google. We are creating some value, but it seems mostly incidental, not intentional. The problem is the whole system is set up to serve a goal different from what it claims to want. A library wants careful curation to be at the heart of everything it does; it doesn't want questions with answers posted within a minute or two. Sep 17 at 12:48

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