32

Whenever I flag a post as being unclear, for example, it is addressed within a matter of minutes. On the other hand, when I flag a post as duplicate, it seems to take days/weeks to be addressed, and often times out, even when to me it seems to be a clear duplicate.

Why is this and is there anything that can be done?

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  • 19
    They are sent to a close vote review queue where it will remain till it needs 3 votes to close. There are currently ~4.3k questions in the queue for review which takes time.
    – Suraj Rao
    Sep 12 at 15:12
  • 11
    most people don't like the review system at all, besides the new first Question/ansewers are even worse than before the hole system is very bad, so the queues keep up piling
    – nbk
    Sep 12 at 16:25
  • 8
    @nbk that's not the only reason. I don't mind reviewing at all. I just can't afford spending an hour using up my votes in a queue. You either do reviewing right (which takes time and effort) or you don't do it all so I choose to not do it at all. Now I could make up some personal rule to only do five or ten reviews or something... but I'm too weak, I end up spending two hours anyway.
    – Gimby
    Sep 13 at 8:01
  • 1
    even when you have 40 vites, it doesn't take an hour to review tasks, what you know you cqan judge and when not skip it, so you can go through very fast. But that is not the fundamental problem of the review system. we give our opinion about a post, when we are reviwing, but getting baned for voicing your opinion is bad very very bad, there is the system of three or five, that prevent misjudging, not always but no system is a hundred percent fool proof. So @Gimby if ysou are not fit in such things or can't decide, simply let it be ignore the red dot and go on with your life
    – nbk
    Sep 13 at 13:03
  • 1
    "but getting banned for voicing your opinion is bad very very bad," - Only reason somebody is becomes reviewed banned is if you are failing audits to catch incorrect review choices or are making those incorrect choices and catching the eye of a moderator who implements a review ban manually. If you are choosing the wrong action while performing review actions, you should learn from those incorrect choices, and stop being review banned. Sep 13 at 20:07
  • 8
    "Why does it take so long for duplicate flags to be resolved?" because we have too many users posting questions without doing exhaustive research before asking. This means we get more and more duplicate questions. We only have so many (capable) curators and they are woefully outnumbered by the volume of bad questions on SO. Sep 14 at 6:02
52

If a post is unreadable because it's very poorly written then it doesn't necessarily require an expert in that question's tags to determine that.

If a question is a duplicate however, then maybe it does require some knowledge of the technologies involved before one could confidently say yes it's a duplicate or no it's not.

Your top tag is . While that isn't unpopular, it certainly doesn't have the following that or have. So given we might need to find another 3 people with knowledge to confirm your assertion that a question is a duplicate, that's why it's a bit harder to get there.

We've already made some recent strides here. Until recently it took 5 people to confirm a duplicate (or any other closure), now it only takes 3, and if you answer a few more questions and get the close questions privilege you'll move from flagging to close to voting to close and then you'll only need two other people to agree with you.

So keep answering questions and we'll give you more power. If you get a gold badge in the tag, we'll even let you close questions as a duplicate unilaterally.

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  • 1
    Indeed, closing as a duplicate was very rare in the Fortran tag until gold bag holders appeared. The questions are either dupe-hammered (as the first or the second vote) or not closed at all.
    – Vladimir F
    Sep 14 at 16:10
  • This answers misunderstands how close flags are marked helpful. It only requires one voter to agree with you on the close reason, not for the question to be closed.
    – Ryan M
    Sep 15 at 16:32
16

is there anything that can be done?

If you feel like there is not going to be enough active high-rep curators, or the close queue gets bottlenecked again, or the question needs to be closed ASAP (for example, for preventing a flood of low-quaility likely upvoted answers), drop by to SOCVR or use the related Stack Exchange CV Request Generator userscript and post a request there.

That said, please, read and internalize the rules the room has regarding making requests (and behaving in general). At the time of this writing, there are only 29 of them, and only some concern requests. If you use the userscript, some preliminary checks are done for you.

As a rule of thumb, if the following is true, and you cannot get a question closed via normal means (i.e. it is taking an unexpectedly long time), this is what you need to make sure of before posting a request:

  1. The post has recent activity (last 6 months ATTOW) (new answers, edits, or edit suggestions) by others (your own doesn't count).
  2. You do not have a conflict of interest or involved with the post (i.e. have non-CW answers on the post or are the question author).
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  • 12
    only 29 of them ... is that an invite to create some more?
    – rene
    Sep 12 at 16:42
  • 1
    @rene we also lack apocryphal rules, so there is a long way to go... Sep 12 at 16:49
  • 1
    @rene do it. do it.
    – Gimby
    Sep 13 at 8:03
  • (Rule 30: there is no rule 30.)
    – Stephen C
    Sep 13 at 9:51
  • 1
    @StephenC that think this should be rule 31. But maybe we can stop at that number...
    – VLAZ
    Sep 13 at 9:55
  • 1
    @VLAZ why, you don't want SOCVR rule 34? :) Sep 13 at 21:10
  • 1
    @OlegValter I think Smokey is hot enough right now.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 14 at 4:46
7

is there anything that can be done?

What you can do is to get a gold tag badge. It requires answers of a total of 1000 points on questions with that tag. When you have acquired the gold badge, you can close as duplicate instantly. It's commonly called "gold hammer" or "dup hammer". You currently have 144 points for the -tag, so there are some points left. :)

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    I suppose answering a lot of duplicates gets you the ability to close them :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 13 at 10:25
  • @Scratte Don't bet on it. That can attract down votes. :)
    – klutt
    Sep 13 at 10:26
  • 1
    I don't think we frequent the same tags. On a side note: I don't agree with downvoting a good Answer.
    – Scratte
    Sep 13 at 10:32
  • 1
    Answering potential duplicates is a great way to NEVER achieve a gold badge in that tag. You have to have 200 answers with a cumulative score of 1000 score. It's difficult to achieve that, it took more than 2 years of continuously answering questions with a tag, to earn my own gold badge in that tag. Just in time for that badge to be replaced by a version topic tag. Sep 13 at 20:12
  • @Scratte In general, I don't like that either. But if the question is crap and I want it closed, and the answer is just enough to answer the question, it may happen that I downvote it. But more importantly, many others will probably do it too.
    – klutt
    Sep 13 at 20:54
  • 1
    I'm not sure what others do is relevant. One is responsible for one's own actions :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 13 at 21:08
  • @Scratte It's very relevant if you do a thing to gain rep, because it's what OTHERS do that determins if f you get or loose rep.
    – klutt
    Sep 13 at 21:32
  • Might be worth noting that once you have that sweet hammer you can filter the close vote queue to your tag and with reason duplicate. Like this. Sep 13 at 22:27
2

Closing duplicates tends to take a lot more knowledge and thought than other kinds of close reasons. It can be difficult to assess whether things are, in fact, duplicates of each other in areas that I don't know much about, so I'll often simply skip this kind of question if I encounter them in the review queues; there are some questions that are immediately apparent what they're duplicates of (like null pointer exceptions in Java, which people ask about a zillion times a day), but in many other cases it requires a little bit of thought to determine whether the dupe target is correct. I may even need to think about whether there's a better dupe target.

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