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Last week, as part of our Outdated Answers project, we ran a test on Stack Overflow to see what would happen if we stopped pinning the accepted answer to the top of the list of answers. As expected, there were no negative repercussions when we made this change. So, as promised, today we are making this change permanent.

By default, answers are now sorted strictly by Votes (descending order by highest score), and the accepted answer's order in the list is based on its score. If you prefer to sort by Active (descending order by answer's created or edited timestamp) or Oldest (ascending order by answer's created timestamp), the accepted answer is also unpinned.

Read on if you're interested in details on what we learned from the experiment.

How we conducted the test

For questions where the highest scored answer was not the accepted answer and the user's preference was the default Votes sort, 50 percent of users saw the accepted answer pinned to the top and the other 50% saw answers sorted by the highest score with the accepted answer unpinned. For both sorts, our success metric was the rate at which users either upvoted or copied.

Findings

We analyzed the data in a number of ways.

  • Users copied or voted on any answer. We looked at users who copied all or part of any answer, or users who took any voting action (upvote, downvote, etc.) on any answer. Our hypothesis was that there would be no statistically significant difference between the two sorts, but we found that when the accepted answer was unpinned there was a 4% increase in copying and voting. Success rate was 20.3% when the accepted answer was pinned, and 21.1% when it was unpinned. (In case you are wondering, upvotes far outnumber downvotes, so we weren't terribly concerned that the two types of votes were mixed together in this analysis.)

  • Users copied the first answer. There was a whopping 61.6% increase in users copying from the top answer when the accepted answer was unpinned and the highest-scoring answer was first in the list of answers. Success rate was 6.9% when the accepted answer was pinned, and 11.2% when it was unpinned.

  • Users upvoted the first answer.  We did not have enough sample size to draw statistically significant conclusions, but there was a 90.5% increase in users upvoting the top answer when the highest-scored answer was shown first. Upvote rate was 0.5% when the accepted answer was pinned, and 1.0% when it was unpinned.

  • Users copied the accepted answer. There was a 43.6% decrease in users copying from the accepted answer when the highest-scored answer was shown first. Copy rate was 6.9% when the accepted answer was pinned, and 3.9% when it was unpinned.

  • Users upvoted the accepted answer. We did not have enough sample size to draw statistically significant conclusions, but there was a 39% decrease in users upvoting the accepted answer when the highest-scored answer was shown first. Upvote rate was 0.5% when the accepted answer was pinned, and 0.3% when it was unpinned.

  • Users copied an answer that was neither the accepted nor highest scored answer. There was an 8% increase in users copying from an answer that was lower down in the list of answers when the highest scored answer was shown first. Copy rate was 5.4% when the accepted answer was pinned, and 5.8% when it was unpinned.

  • Users upvoted an answer that was neither the accepted nor highest scored answer. We did not have enough sample size to draw statistically significant conclusions, but there was a 3.5% decrease in users upvoting an answer that was lower down in the list of answers when the highest scored answer was shown first. Upvote rate was 0.48% when the accepted answer was pinned, and 0.46% when it was unpinned.

Feedback

Please leave any bugs related to unpinning the accepted answer as answers below this post. We will monitor this post until Wednesday, September 15. Report any further issues after September 15 as new questions on Meta.

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    "There was a 43.6% decrease in users copying from the accepted answer when the highest-scored answer was shown first." This seems pretty darn promising. I suspect it will have huge ramifications for programming for years to come, even if it is the kind of thing that is a 'between the lines' or 'below the radar' change.
    – TylerH
    Sep 8 at 16:05
  • 7
    I wonder what data could be collected provided the experiment was conducted for longer, but the results look very promising. In about a month from now will be able take it from here with SEDE queries, and if the findings are confirmed, that would mean a great success for the project. Sep 8 at 16:08
  • 113
    I love that this happened. This was one of the first things I attempted to do when I was hired at Stack and wasn't able to get buy-in to get it done. I thank the team for tackling the problem and making the change.
    – Taryn StaffMod
    Sep 8 at 16:10
  • 10
    This is great, especially in cases where an answer was accepted that either (a) wasn't the best answer at the time (but the asker just accepted due to first answer, or easiest answer, or peer pressure from the answerer or from the accept rate scenario) or (b) is no longer the best solution to the original problem because better techniques or features have come along. (b) is the target here I presume, but (a) is very real. Sep 8 at 16:21
  • 3
    Note for people having trouble understanding "decrease/increase" terminology: it means that compared to the control group (pinned answer), the treatment group (unpinned answer) did some action less/more.
    – Braiam
    Sep 8 at 16:49
  • 6
    Perhaps this suggests that we need to call the accepted answer something other than accepted? I am not suggesting a community answer, attempting to get the mob to select high-quality content, will be harder than trying to herd an entire fleet of flying wet cats in airplanes. Forget about the snakes on the planes you have to worry about those wet cats. Sep 8 at 16:50
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    @Pureferret "Wrong/harmful" is highly subjective and hard to quantify. We tried a flagging exercise to try to quantify this, but the results weren't conclusive.
    – Anita Taylor StaffMod
    Sep 8 at 16:59
  • 3
    @Pureferret well, it is mostly the precise reason for unpinning the accepted answer. The OP is unlikely to know whether the answer is harmful/insecure, etc. The community, however, is far more likely to know that and express that by downvoting and/or commenting on such an answer. I am not sure about the hard numbers, but if you want to, it's possible to quantify via SEDE on the SQL tag since a lot of people use the Auto Review Comments userscript to point out that an answer is vulnerable to SQL injection (as an example) Sep 8 at 17:19
  • 3
    While an improvement, it sometimes leads to deviant cases like this where the most upvoted answer is, for some reason, extremely popular even though it's not right. Sep 8 at 17:19
  • 2
    See announcement on MSE.
    – bad_coder
    Sep 8 at 17:23
  • 3
    @user4581301 well, those are far rarer than the opposite. And there are tools that the community can use to fix those, unlike the accepted answer.
    – Braiam
    Sep 8 at 17:39
  • 3
    @user4581301 That question seems like one (of many) that simply has been relegated to the dustbin of history. Might be worth asking in the C++ chatroom or somewhere if folks can clean up that question and the answers (there's a NAA there that has lasted over a decade), or maybe create a canonical answer, since it has that issue and seems fairly popular still today (with 34k views).
    – TylerH
    Sep 8 at 19:41
  • 3
    It does make one wonder what the value of a "selected answer" is. If anything it seems to deter further answers, even though as this experiment shows non-selected answers can be the most valuable ones.
    – Mark
    Sep 8 at 20:26
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    eh, at least for most questions, marking something as "accepted" indicates that it actually solved the problem the op had. There is some intrinsic value in that information, even if it turns out to not actually be the one the majority prefers to go with it over the long-term.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 8 at 20:30
  • 4
    @nick012000 why wouldn't it be visible? The browser is an application like any other. It can detect copies and pastes. You can even add stuff in the clipboard via JS. There is a copy event as well as a paste event which can be listened for. You can only listen for them on the page, not in other applications, but still.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 13 at 9:42

15 Answers 15

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As an almost exclusively necro-poster, this change removes the only potential foothold that was available when I post something valuable on an old page with hugely upvoted answers.

If a question from 2010 has 15 answers, and I post a modern, superior answer AND the OP accepts it, then researchers didn't have to journey to the next page/tab to find it because it was pinned to the top of the first page.

Should the green tick at least ensure that the accepted answer is always on the first page?

While I am generally in favor of this new feature, it is bad when there is a provably incorrect answer with loads of upvotes.

On the other hand, it is super good when the accepted answer is significantly downvoted.

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    They are already working on this: "To start chipping away at this larger issue, we are in the early stages of developing a Trending sort that will give newer answers a better chance of gaining traction." - Outdated Answers: unpinning the accepted answer A/B test Sep 9 at 5:26
  • 51
    "AND the OP accepts it" Does that actually happen significantly often? Sep 9 at 6:28
  • 32
    Not enough, if you ask me. :) ...but it has happened. Sep 9 at 6:29
  • 4
    Needs some system so recent votes are worth more in the sorting then very old votes. Eg an answer on page 3 that gets more votes then answers are expected to get on page 3 should move up. Sep 9 at 9:11
  • 8
    I don't have a magic bullet solution for weighting votes, but I think the votes that are cast in the first hour are the least authentic votes. These votes come from people who are unlikely to be personally benefitting from the answer. Early votes come from users who (I have given an unsavory name to and will curb the urge to use it here) think they are encouraging contributors -- but they are mostly encouraging FGITW contributors. Sep 9 at 9:15
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    A counterpoint: This new system allows your new answers to old questions to be displayed above old accepted answers with no action from the OP required.
    – Ryan M
    Sep 9 at 13:27
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    @mickmackusa I often vote on answers to new questions based on the content, judged with my expertise. I’m often following questions and answers. Most of the time, two to four answers get posted and I read most of them and vote accordingly. An additional, very late answer is not needed most of the time. Even if a late answer comes along, maybe even one that is necessary due to deprecation of older technology or similar, I’ll be notified anyway and vote accordingly. I don’t vote to “encourage” contributors. I vote for the benefit of other readers, particularly future readers. Sep 9 at 17:04
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    As another necroposter, I really don't care. I've had answers that were posted several years (with +10 answers) after and still got pretty near the top. It takes time, but it does work.
    – Braiam
    Sep 9 at 17:42
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    And as another [semi-]necroposter, can only sign off on the above. Good content does surface with time, accepted or not. It's actually the acceptance mark that prevented a lot of good content to surface, and I am so glad SE found the balls to do it. Sep 9 at 17:52
  • 2
    Unpinning accepted answers is generally good if the highly upvoted answers are equally good or better. However, IMHO, in most so-called "canonical" posts, accepted answers should not be unpinned. So, looking forward to "Trending sort" feature. Sep 10 at 8:37
  • For very wrong answers, then I'd add a comment or edit the answer to add a disclaimer. Thankfully, that seems much more rare than the opposite...
    – rogerdpack
    Sep 10 at 15:37
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    @rog it is rare, but it is a problem. Adding a comment and downvoting is not a solution when the poster of an incorrect answer does nothing. The bad content should never have earned any upvotes. Editing the answer to become correct is a disservice to other correct answers which have rightly earned whatever votes they've earned. The only good outcome in my opinion is for the community to delete the bad content which is damaging the "researcher experience". Sep 10 at 20:17
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    For outdated answers, I think the onus now lies on the necroposter to edit popular answers to include version numbers. This doesn't help in the case of provably incorrect answers, but it can help when popular answers are made incorrect by some version change.
    – Daly
    Sep 14 at 18:21
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    @TheFool the OP can flip their accepted answer anywhere around the page (or remove it entirely) as much as they like, as many times as they like, regardless of editing times. It is different from reversing an up/down vote. Sep 14 at 20:54
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    @AnitaTaylor How about showing the accepted answer first if it's more than a week newer than all answers with higher score? Or showing it before all the answers older than it? This way if OP accepted a new answer, it will be highly visible. This is especially useful if the old answers stopped being valid or a new, superior approach has become possible.
    – user31389
    Sep 14 at 21:08
62

Thank you for the team for doing this! I think it's a very positive step for the community.

We'll need to remember to make appropriate updates in the Help Center, such as the help answer on What does it mean when an answer is "accepted"? (emphasis changed):

If you accept:

  • someone else's answer: You gain +2 reputation and the author of the accepted answer earns +15 reputation.
  • your own answer: No reputation is awarded, and the answer does not float to the top of the list. You must wait 48 hours to accept your own answer.
  • a community-wiki answer: No reputation is awarded.

It looks like most of the other references to "float" or "pin" are gone, so that's probably just a single missing reference. There are a few other CW answers on meta (like this one and this one) that might need updates too, though those might depend on whether the unpinning will happen across other SE sites as well.

Speaking of that, as this becomes the norm across the site, I am very curious if it has any effect on the acceptance rate on answers, particularly among new users. If there is any motivation in acceptance of "this answer was most useful to me and I'd like to pin it to the top", that motivation may disappear. I don't think that's a likely outcome—the checkmark stays, the +2 rep stays, and the social grace of "my question has been answered" stays as well—but I could see that as a long-term effect based on the wide variety of motivations to accept an answer.

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    Updated the Help Center article and the first Meta post you referenced. Did not update the second as it was from 2009.
    – Anita Taylor StaffMod
    Sep 8 at 20:31
  • @Anita Thank you! Yeah, the second one has already been duped against other questions anyway. Sep 8 at 20:33
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    And to the set of FAQs (ongoing). Sep 8 at 20:58
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    If there are meta posts that contain mentions of pinning, please feel free to update them!
    – Catija StaffMod
    Sep 8 at 21:30
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This is an excellent change. No more scrolling way down the page to see someone crying out that the accepted answer is bad/broken/misleading (I hope)!

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Unpinning the accepted answer is a good change.

However, I would still very much like a clear indication (near the top of the question) that an answer has been accepted and offer a link to jump to it. As it is now, when viewing the question, there is no indication that an answer has been accepted unless you scroll through the answers (if there are other answers that have more votes).

Perhaps a link next to the sorting buttons, something like:

Suggested link to jump to the accepted answer

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    There’s an older comment where this has been suggested. Sep 15 at 5:19
  • "Go to the accepted answer" kind of defeats the purpose, imo. A smaller change: in case of equal scores, the accepted answer should be at the top among these same score answers. Sep 23 at 13:34
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I agree with the change, thanks for doing this.

For users who want to keep the old behaviour, I've written a small userscript, Accepted Answer Pinner (direct installation linkStack Apps post). It pins the accepted answer back on top, unless it's a self-answer that wouldn't qualify for pinning in the old situation.

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When the accepted answer has the same number of votes as other answers, I would expect the accepted answer to be listed first (e.g. here: How to convert string to float in Python? Why is it a float when directly assigned but a string when a user inputs it?)

However in the link above, the accepted answer is (currently, for me at least) third in the list (presumably some other secondary sort criteria is applied? It doesn't appear to be timestamp or user rep, but I could be wrong)

I am interested if this was a conscious decision (in which case, fine, although I'd be interested in the reasoning); or just an artefact of unpinning the accepted answer (in which case, should we consider adjusting the sort order for this scenario?)

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    No other sorting criteria is being used, answers with same number of votes are sorted randomly (refresh the page to see). Sep 9 at 8:15
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    Ah, yes, I see that now. Still, if we have an accepted answer do we want to consider including that in the sort criterion and randomise the rest then? Or not? Sep 9 at 8:16
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    This is similar to this feature request. Sep 9 at 9:01
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    I think newer answers with same vote count should come 1st as to get same vote in less time they must be better. Sep 9 at 9:14
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    @IanRingrose "must" might be a bit strong, but generally I'd agree... unless the vote count is 0... Sep 9 at 10:24
  • @simonalexander2005 is your condition on low vote count to discourage making a direct copy of an existing answer, which would appear above it and be more likely to be upvoted? For similar content, the older/original answer should be preferred, but of course unless it's an identical copy that is hard to automate.
    – craq
    Sep 11 at 1:08
  • 1
    @craq yes, for similar content I agree, but where you have a collection of disparate answers with 0 votes "to get same vote in less time they must be better" isn't necessarily true - 0 is the default, it means no-one's bothered to interact with it yet, so you can't say that the vote count really means something in my opinion Sep 13 at 7:51
  • I came to report this as well. The green tick went from having infinite weight to having zero weight. It should at least be used as a secondary sort criteria. Sep 14 at 17:12
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    Maybe an accepted answer should have it's votes boosted by 1.5× or something.
    – rjmunro
    Sep 15 at 16:35
  • I think the accepted answer should be the second sorting criteria (would basically count as half of a vote). Some people accept the answer but don't vote for it.
    – Tometzky
    Sep 21 at 12:19
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I'm loving this change! There's just one small point of feedback I have:

Can we also have this on Meta?

In the past, there have been heavily downvoted answers that got accepted because they basically tell the OP exactly what they want to hear.
I think it'd be better not to pin those.

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    I mentioned that same concern back in the old feature request. There would be some false positives, because the voting culture on Meta is a bit twisted, but overall I agree that we are better off bringing this change here as well. Sep 9 at 10:24
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    It has been useful to be able to pin an answer for burnination requests though because usually the initial "Yes, this is a good idea" answer has more upvotes than the eventual "OK, we're officially doing this" answer. IIRC, there are also answers from employees that are both the answer and are wildly downvoted. Would we want an alternative in either of those cases?
    – BSMP
    Sep 9 at 11:21
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    @BSMP there's a feature request already for this: Add an option for mods and staff to pin a certain answer to the top on meta sites
    – Andrew T.
    Sep 9 at 11:34
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    @BSMP Reliance on accepted answers for pinning answers was a spotty idea at best, since it requires the asker to actively monitor the question. For burnination, it's a nice-to-have but there are plenty of old good burnination requests by users that are no longer active, so we can't rely on it already.
    – Erik A
    Sep 10 at 13:25
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How to counter the "Early Bird Effect"?

The change could be a way to cater for the outdated solutions but the change also applies to all posts, new or old.

Would this change also makes it difficult to find a solution that gone through very detailed consideration by the answerer and that really fit the requirement of OP but just answered it later than the other people who post answers quicker and earlier?

From my observation, at least in the tag that I focus mostly in, people who post answers early are more often to get more upvotes than an answer who post later. I would call this Early Bird Effect because new posts are more readily attracting people viewing the posts and more people to vote if an answer is good (but not necessarily the best respective to OP's requirements).

People answers late may take extended time in crafting a comprehensive solution that fit well the requirements but then also got the penality? that there are less people to see their answers and thus got less chance for upvotes.

Pinning the accepted solution at the top could reduce this kind of Early Bird Effect. Ultimately, it is the OP that have chosen this solution that at least the OP think is best for their requirement. Should we respect their choice that the solution they picked is the best? Understand that sometimes for some OP new to the field, they may not be able to pick the best solution. But I more often see other people who upvote really don't go into the very details of the requirements and think clearly enough for them to judge what's the best solution.

So, any remedy for this situation after we unpin the accepted solution permanently?

One last comment is that in the old days, even the accepted solution is not the best and/or is outdated, people can still easily check the highest vote answer by scrolling a little bit down to the second answer listed. Now, we are more difficult to find the accepted solution (that's the best at least according to OP) somewhere down in the list of answers (could be the 4th, 5th, or even 8th answer down in the list, if this accepted answer only got one upvote from OP, while several other quickly posted answers could have 2 or 3 votes and listed higher).

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    "So, any remedy for this situation after we unpin the accepted solution permanently?" yes - go and vote on all answers. Which is not much different to before. After all, the recent change changed the order of the results in some cases, thus proving that the top answer is not necessarily the most voted one in all cases. And I'm talking about answers that are years old, not something from today. Thus it's not the early bird advantage, either.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 9 at 16:17
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    "Should we respect their choice that the solution they picked is the best?" it's the one that worked for them. That doesn't mean "best". In many cases OP isn't fit to judge "best". After all, if they did, they might not have asked a question seeking a solution. I don't mean that all question authors are not fit to judge the answers but to highlight that not all question authors are fit to judge the answers. An acceptance shouldn't have that much of an impact.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 9 at 16:19
  • "Now, we are more difficult to find the accepted solution (that's the best at least according to OP) somewhere down in the list of answers." doesn't that just involve "scrolling a little bit down"?
    – VLAZ
    Sep 9 at 16:20
  • @VLAZ Agree with what you mentioned about that not ALL OP's are fit to give a good judgement to the best solution. That's why I also mentioned this in my post above. For the old days, the highest votes one, even not accepted will be the SECOND one. Now, the accepted answer could be several positions down the list and could even be buried down at the bottom.
    – SeaBean
    Sep 9 at 16:24
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    @VLAZ If we are to question whether OP's are qualified to judge an answer, have you even think of those giving the votes could also be even less qualified in judging the answer based on the question ? A very pretty solution but not fitting the requirement could attract quite some votes, but then is it fit for the question ? We can't assume the qualification of OP's but we even can't assume wise judgement from all those upvote is giving a right vote to match the real requirement of the question or not.
    – SeaBean
    Sep 9 at 16:31
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    A unilateral decision has more impact if it's wrong than one voted on by many. If the accepted answer is further down, you don't need to do anything much different. Look at all the answers, evaluate them, vote on them. If the accepted answer is good, it's going to rise to the top. The "early bird" bonus is definitely not insurmonable. It's just a matter of more people voting. Most early answers I see get something like 3-4 votes tops for being first. If that. While the green checkmark has been a joke for years
    – VLAZ
    Sep 9 at 16:35
  • @VLAZ I do think voting system is good and avoid the unilateral decision situation. But, we also need to aware that OP's is the real one that faces the problem. He may had been working hours and hours on the problem and thus know much more than other bystanders that only spend less than 1 minute reading the question. That's why I think we better give some more respects and also more proportion of votes to OP's regarding their decisions of picking the answers. I did suggest giving OP's certain number of votes more to counter other votes, or certain % more but seems nothing done on this
    – SeaBean
    Sep 9 at 16:50
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    You seem to be under the assumption that answers are for the question asker. That's not the case. The question asker is in the extreme minority of people who would benefit from the answers. The question asker is literally one user. The rest of the beneficiaries are everybody else who visits the question.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 9 at 16:53
  • @VLAZ If the answers were voted only by the question asker or people who visits the question and faces similar problem, I would totally agree with what you say. But the truth is there are a lot of bystanders who may not really know well the problem and even not reading the question in every details but giving votes. Sometimes pretty answers would already attracts a lot of upvotes but without really facing the problem, are they really giving the right votes? Of course, there may be some experts also giving the votes, but chances are non-experts giving incorrect votes could be even higher.
    – SeaBean
    Sep 9 at 17:04
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    If what you say is true, shouldn't we discard all downvotes because most of them are wrong anyway? Why is this a problem now - your claims make it apparent that it would have been an issue all the time over the last dozen years SO has been active? Why haven't you raised awareness before? Can you provide proof that SO has been using the wrong model all this time and question authors should been the makers or breakers of answers?
    – VLAZ
    Sep 9 at 17:10
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    "Early Bird Effect" AKA Fastest Gun in the West (FGITW)(?) Sep 10 at 8:24
7

There was a suggestion from user31389 in the comments on another answer that I agree with strongly and that I think deserves to be an answer itself (emphasis mine):

How about showing the accepted answer first if it's more than a week newer than all answers with higher score? Or showing it before all the answers older than it? This way if OP accepted a new answer, it will be highly visible. This is especially useful if the old answers stopped being valid or a new, superior approach has become possible.

The problem with unpinning the accepted answer entirely and sorting only by score is that it suffers from largely the same problem that it was meant to solve: older, outdated answers being shown ahead of newer, more helpful ones. With this current change, even if the OP accepts a new helpful answer that is objectively better than the existing ones, that more useful answer may remain buried beneath older ones and never see the light of day by anyone but the OP who would get a notification. It would be much less likely to eventually attract enough votes to move ahead of the older, potentially outdated answers.

The suggestion to pin the accepted answer above older answers, but not above newer ones, seems like it would resolve this problem in both cases. Newer answers that get more votes still rise over the accepted answer, but a newer answer that the OP accepts as better than the existing ones would rise above the existing answers, even if they had already been highly upvoted.

For what it's worth, it's been my observation on every SE site that I frequent that answers that are posted sooner get more upvotes, even when there are objectively better answers posted later, simply by virtue of the fact that they're listed first until/unless the OP accepts an answer. Having the accepted answer rise above those has historically been one of the best counters against the problem of outdated answers (as well as just a counter against quick, so-so answers being displayed above slower, but more useful ones, even if the earlier ones aren't technically outdated.)

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  • @Shog9 That is indeed an interesting proposal, though I'm not sure that I'm a fan of the concept of the "sickiness" eventually timing out, since it's common (in my observation, at least) for a late answer to never pass earlier answers in votes, even if it is objectively better and accepted. At least on the non-SO sites, the views that a question gets in the first couple of days often seem to be more than it will get in the next decade, especially from registered users. I'm not as familiar with whether that holds on SO or not with its high Google traffic, though.
    – reirab
    Sep 17 at 3:03
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    I think there are downsides to both approaches, @reirab - most especially considering that older answers can be and are edited, making the posting date irrelevant in many cases. I strongly suspect a more nuanced sort option that takes the recency of accept into account along with the recency of other votes might win out over both.
    – Shog9
    Sep 17 at 3:32
  • @Shog9 Agreed. A system that considers age of the votes and accept would almost certainly be the best option. An answer that got 100 upvotes in the last 6 months should probably be shown ahead of one that got 1,000 upvotes 10 years ago, but only 10 within the last year, for example.
    – reirab
    Sep 17 at 3:51
5

It's a very good step and will surely improve how SO delivers knowledge and the experiment and conclusion were done quite fast. Full marks on that.

However, it took extremely long (6-8 years) to even start an experiment about it. Zero marks on that.

I think this delay is really bad in general. It shows that there are still huge gains to win by relatively simple adjustments. My conclusion is that by far not enough experiments are done. I hope that this bottleneck can be overcome in the future, although judging from the past I'm not overly optimistic about that.

I could imagine at least 10 such experiments per year would be a good number. You would learn more from them.

Need an example? What about a copy button on the corner of code snippets. The metric (number of copies) is already in place, the button itself is fairly standard to implement (and standard on many other sites too, so the idea is not really new). An experiment about that could be conducted at extremely low costs. Maybe it would show that people copy even more if there is a button (or maybe not). And it would even save time for the users.

There are probably many similar experiments that would not require much work to implement and are often asked for and could be done right now. Please consider doing them soon.

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  • I agree with the criticism that this took shockingly long to implement. I remember SO giving complete rebuffs to it years ago. The users were right all along! Having the humility to gather actual data is really important, and I hope this experiment reflects a culture shift away from "we know best".
    – Thomas
    Sep 17 at 9:59
4

Some thought needs to be given into how this interacts with deleted answers.

Out of curiosity, I went to check out what this did with my most upvoted answer. What I saw was the question at the top (obviously), then all the deleted junk (mostly comments posted as answers by low-rep users), and finally, all the way below that, my answer.

From the perspective of someone looking for answers, this is just horrible UI.

From the perspective of the person who spent couple of days putting that answer together... well do the math.


For those that can't see deleted posts, here's an illustration:

Enter image description here

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  • 6
    Hey there. I don't think this is really relevant, deleted answers are non visible to the extremely vast majority of humans that interact with posts. For instance, there is exactly one answer in the question you link. Moreover, the "active" sort button is ... active in your screenshot, which also influences answers order. If you sorted by votes this would not happen. Sep 11 at 14:49
  • ... also why did you remove the actual question from your screenshot? in reality the ratio deleted answers / question / answer is way different than what your cropped screenshot presents. Sep 11 at 14:59
  • 1
    @FélixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier Because I don't have a screen big enough to take a screenshot that fits it all. Also not sure what reality you're talking about -- there's 7 answers, 6 of them deleted.
    – Dan Mašek
    Sep 11 at 15:01
  • 4
    I talk about the reality where 99.9% of users are under 10k reputation points. Just in case you don't know, anyone who isn't logged in, or have under 10k reputation points, doesn't see this. Moreover, you purposefully order answers in a way that lets the deleted ones be on top of yours. Sep 11 at 15:03
  • 1
    As for the screenshot, it's ok not to have a big screen, but the way you present this, is that most of the space on screen is used up by the deleted answers, whereas in reality (as in, what people see) the ratio of question to deleted answers is totally not so bad as what you make it to be. Sep 11 at 15:06
  • For instance, if you want to see what most people see, you can look at the question from an incognito window. no deleted answers. Sep 11 at 15:08
  • 3
    "you purposefully order answers in a way that lets the deleted ones be on top of yours." -- What? It's on "Active" sort, and I haven't touched that setting in ages. Amazing how well you can guess my ill intentions. Thank you for putting me in my place.
    – Dan Mašek
    Sep 11 at 15:23
  • 2
    I don't know about your intentions. I do presume that when speaking about ordering of answers you would yourself care about ordering of the answers. The point is that the problem you speak of, is 100% made from specifics of your situation, while ignoring that your answer is literally 10 times longer than all deleted answers together, and that almost nobody sees that screen like you show it. It'd be great if you addressed any of that. Sep 11 at 15:25
  • 1
    For instance, you could take a full page screen shot from the inspector and replace the image in your answer, that would make it less misleading. instructions on how to take full screen shot from inspector : mbsdirect.com/mbs-blog/… Sep 11 at 15:34
  • 1
    In the "Oldest" view, your answer appears first (admittedly few users use this view due to it not being the default). Sep 11 at 20:36
  • 3
    Deleted answers really could be sorted at the bottom unless the sorting order is by date (newest, oldest). Making life a bit easier for >10k is probably a good thing.
    – Trilarion
    Sep 12 at 10:41
  • 2
    Yes, I certainly find it a bit annoying when deleted answers are shown higher than non-deleted answers (when I see a deleted answer I instinctively think I've gotten to the end of the real answers). However, I'm not sure that overriding the sort order is really the answer to this - since I might want to include deleted answers in that sort. I think a better solution would be the ability to toggle the showing/hiding of deleted answers (for 10K> users).
    – MrWhite
    Sep 14 at 15:27
  • 3
    This seems to be an issue of the “Active” sort criteria, as the problem does not occur with “Votes” nor “Oldest”. In my opinion, deleted answer should always be at the end, however, I can’t get the logic applied here. “Active” does not mean “Newest” and there are edits and comments at your answer newer than those of some of the deleted answers, so why is yours at the end when “Active” is chosen? I have no idea.
    – Holger
    Sep 16 at 7:56
3

If the rationale is that the best answers "rise to the top" so there's no need to pin an accepted answer, please re-pin it on the views where that doesn't happen: "Active" and "Oldest". The "Votes" view is the only one where the most upvoted one appears first.

It happens I use the "Oldest" view a lot. Often, the oldest answer is not the best by whatever measure you want to apply, whether it's votes or the question poster's opinion (accepted answer), or objective reality. ;-)

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    Well, pinning the accepted answer is also wrong on those views: it isn't the oldest nor the active one (which was something that bothered me to no end when I used those).
    – Braiam
    Sep 11 at 14:24
  • 3
    @Braiam - I can see that point of view, but disagree with it. I don't need intellectual purity. I need utility. This would be the most useful thing (to me). Sep 11 at 14:30
  • Yeah, that's the thing, the accepted answer is just the one that OP thought that solved their issue (even if it literally doesn't solve the issue, or solves something else). It's not the "best".
    – Braiam
    Sep 11 at 15:38
  • 1
    @Braiam - Yes, but it's a better indicator than oldest or most-recently-active, both of which are usually even more wrong. In fact, I'd say it's a much better indicator. Off the cuff I'd say of questions I've seen with accepted ansewrs, easily 30-70% of them [yes, wide range] are good answers. (Maybe not the best, but good.) Sep 11 at 15:45
  • "better indicator" of what? If you want quality... why the heck would you order by anything other than score?
    – Braiam
    Sep 11 at 16:49
  • 1
    @Braiam - I contribute on SO a lot. I find that ordering the most useful for doing that. But I also seek information on SO often as well. I've generally found the pinned accepted answer thing to work quite well for that -- until it went away. (I know enough to scroll around if the accepted one doesn't seem right for what I need, but I've found it's often -- usually -- entirely sufficient.) It's clear that you're not going to talk me out of wanting it back, nor am I going to talk you into it being good to bring it back, so let's just leave it there. :-) Sep 11 at 16:57
  • @T.J.Crowder The you can switch between the two modes "searching for answers" and "contributing" by changing the search setting. That is one of the reasons it exist. When you want to get an answer, sort by votes.
    – MegaIng
    Sep 12 at 13:41
  • 1
    @MegaIng - Of course I can, and I will. It's just a pain, and easy to forget, and the change (for those two views) is just pointless. Sep 12 at 14:06
1

Are there plans to carry this over to other Stack Exchange network sites? This is probably also useful on non-coding based posts.

1
-2

Finally!

This pinning of accepted answer gives OP way too much power, and I stopped accepting answers for that single reason.

Now I will consider going back to accept answers, even if I still think it's a weird feature. What if there are two or three answers that I think are equally good? What if it comes a better answer later? It serves virtually no point, since the only thing it says is that "OP thought this was the best answer". That has absolutely no use for me when I'm reading a question later.

What's even weirder is the culture that it's rude to not single out one answer to accept.

But anyway, I'm happy that it finally had its most fatal flaw corrected.

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    If a better answer comes later, the accepted answer can be changed. It does happen. Sep 10 at 8:19
  • 4
    I don't agree with your stance on accepting answers. In most cases it's very helpful to direct future readers to the most helpful answer and in most cases it's very clear which answer is best. And you as OP are the one who has the best judgement. Also it acts as a brake, somewhat, on later users to keep adding new answers, which I find a very annoying phenomenon on Stack Overflow, because it hardly ever improves a Q&A as a whole. Usually it only adds noise. If there's no clear-cut "winner", well, then don't accept. Sep 12 at 9:51
  • 2
    @GertArnold When it's very clear what the best answer is, that answer typically get upvoted most too. I don't see what an accepted answer adds to that.
    – klutt
    Sep 12 at 11:03
  • 4
    @GertArnold I would possibly agree if questions asked by firsttimers were a clear minority. In the typical case here, OP is NOT qualified enough to have that power.
    – klutt
    Sep 12 at 11:05
  • "... and I stopped accepting answers for that single reason." => Hum..., "lucky" for you you don't (need to) ask Qt's in the (small) Tag I answer, as I guess I wouldn't even try to help you... I always check the "Behaviour" on the Site for Askers with Rep >1 about their previous Qt's and how they "handled" them, and hum [1/25] for the last 25 Qt's (and [23/70] in total), that would be a complete "Show-Killer" for me, sorry... I find it a bit of a "strange" Stance for an Answerer with 27k-Rep, 70 Qt's and 1000 Answers...
    – chivracq
    Sep 18 at 23:17
-44

Maybe you could sort the answers by the rep what the OP got with them. So: accept equals 1.5 upvote, a downvote equals -0.2 upvote, and bounties as their rep/10. It would be also a way to use bounties to move forward the exceptionally useful answers.

The rationale: the indicator of how useful are our posts on the site, is the reputation we got for them. There is no obvious reason to use a different indicator (like the difference of the ups/downs) to determine the default answer order.

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  • 22
    So an answer with 4 upvotes and 10 downvotes (net 20 points, score -6) , ranks higher than an answer with 2 upvotes and 1 downvote (net 10 points, score 1)? What would be gained by that? Why would you want to make downvotes so much less important in ranking answers?
    – yivi
    Sep 8 at 17:25
  • 4
    I would be on board with this suggestion, if we also set upvotes and downvotes to be worth the same amount of rep
    – Kevin B
    Sep 8 at 17:30
  • 1
    @yivi Upvotes are 5 times more important to us than the downs, this is why they worth 5 times more. It is pretty logical to mirror the same worth also in the default answer order.
    – peterh
    Sep 8 at 17:30
  • @KevinB Ok, but then the current suggestion to give an explanation of the down should be made a requirement. It is easy to say, if something is bad, saying what would be then good, is much more hard.
    – peterh
    Sep 8 at 17:38
  • 14
    I would suggest Downvotes are not worth 5 times less than an upvote to almost everyone, @peterh . It makes literally no sense that an answer with a score of -15 (+10/-25) is ranked higher than one with a score of 4 (+4/-0) .
    – Larnu
    Sep 8 at 17:38
  • 1
    @peterh That's already a requirement, you can't downvote without giving a reason. Every downvote comes with a reason. It's not our fault Stack hasn't moved on making that reason more visible.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 8 at 17:39
  • @Larnu No - the usefulness of a post is more important than its unusability. If you are looking for a solution on the internet, you read always bad solutions or no-solutions, until the first good solution. That is an asymmetry, this is why is there are also an asymmetry in the up/down worths.
    – peterh
    Sep 8 at 17:40
  • 1
    "until the first good solution." Yep, so we make sure the good solution is first; glad you agree now. Highest score first. 👍
    – Larnu
    Sep 8 at 17:41
  • @KevinB There is no such requirement. Only a suggestion appears and we are free to vote down anything.
    – peterh
    Sep 8 at 17:41
  • 4
    You appear to be confused, @peterh , rep and score aren't the same things. Perhaps that's why you think that those with the highest net rep earned should go first.
    – Larnu
    Sep 8 at 17:42
  • 2
    @peterh it's not a requirement, it happens automagically when you click the vote arrow. Every time, with or without your consent
    – Kevin B
    Sep 8 at 17:46
  • 5
    A bountied answer that sits at -19 score with a single upvote would be, more often than not, pinned to the top. How is that useful for users searching for answers? Does this proposal even attempt to make a finding quality content easier for users looking to solve a problem? I see no attempt on reasoning what would be good with this proposed change. With its lack of substance, it looks almost like trolling.
    – yivi
    Sep 8 at 17:52
  • 3
    Bounties motivate good answers. They don't necessarily indicate them; the community does that by voting. Sep 8 at 18:50
  • 3
    "then the current suggestion to give an explanation of the down should be made a requirement" does this mean that upvotes should come with a A4 page essay on why it was useful, as they are "worth 5 times more"?
    – Larnu
    Sep 8 at 19:31
  • 4
    If it's so easy to explain the downvote, it must be even easier to explain the upvote then, @peterh . Of upvote is worth 5 more times more (as you keep claiming) than a downvote, so the effort to explain the upvote should to be 5 times more, or 5 times easier, no? Otherwise why is a lesser class citizen, according to you, needing to be justified? That sounds like very medieval prejudice to me...
    – Larnu
    Sep 8 at 19:48

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