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These are some of my recent questions:

Some are downvoted, some are severely downvoted. I agree to the closures. I am never, didn't, will not challenge them

I have made edits to better tackle the close notices (why a question was deleted). They are now to a better standard - as to the best state I can make them. Both questions have been answered - for which I am grateful - But in the comments. Not the place for the answer which completely solves it. I would like to answer myself to them - hope they get reopened.

And recently I got this message:

You have reached your question limit It looks like you might need a break - take a breather and come back soon!

You've asked 6 questions recently, some of which have not been received very well by the community. Everyone learns at their own pace, and it’s okay to make some mistakes. However, the reception your questions have received thus far might ultimately block your account from asking questions entirely.

It's been 1 day since you asked your last question. We ask that you wait 1 day before asking again. Use this time to revisit your previous questions, editing to address any issues that folks have pointed out in comments.

There was some damage to my user-account-record because of the downvotes to my questions and probably the closures.

What can I do to make these questions better?

31
  • 5
    "Some are downvoted, some are severly." I suspect that the reason one is is due to the meta effect from your other meta question.
    – Larnu
    Sep 6 at 17:02
  • 2
    Unfortunately, I don't think there's much you can do for those questions. The first is a simple misunderstanding of what you had, the question itself is fine, it's just... not good. The second you input 4, that hits the while Howmany < HowmanyDID:, and 0 < 4 so no further code runs, and as mentioned in the comments, you never call your function.
    – Nick
    Sep 6 at 17:03
  • 2
    "What parameters and what thresholds leads someone to that question limit?" No one that knows this will inform you; it's specifically not revealed so that it can't be "gamified".
    – Larnu
    Sep 6 at 17:03
  • 4
    There are three things that I think will help you. 1. When you have a question, then stare at your code, and debug it, then search and read. Basically pretend asking a Question at Stack Overflow isn't an option. Try everything you can to figure it out. 2. Read all the pages in the help center. 3. Answer Question, don't ask them. You may think that asking is a good way to learn, but it's not. Asking is good when you know what you're doing, and there's no options left. You really need an expert to figure it out.
    – Scratte
    Sep 6 at 17:12
  • 5
    “What can I do to make these questions better?” - Slowing down and properly researching a subject before asking a question about it. You asked what location.href does but never explained what you didn’t understand specifically Sep 6 at 17:15
  • 1
    @Gomesz785 - Did you search for resources that explained “location.href”, I found 20, with my first Google search. Sep 6 at 17:21
  • 4
    If you are deleting your own questions you should stop that. Users cannot reverse their votes if you delete your contributions. Submitting a question, and getting feedback on that question and even an answer, only for the author of that question to delete it due to downvotes is one of the most frustrating things as an avid answerer Sep 6 at 17:24
  • 3
    ".... but the recent one needs more votes from hi rep users" -- huh? You may not really want what you wish for Sep 6 at 17:30
  • 2
    @Gomesz785: regarding "is it wrong?" it may be harmful to you. By highlighting your Stack Overflow questions on meta, you often can bring more votes to the questions, but they may be down-votes. Again, be careful what you wish for. Never ask for votes-- is a good rule of thumb to follow Sep 6 at 17:31
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    This question should not be undeleted, in my opinion. It's completely off topic; there is no recovery.
    – Larnu
    Sep 6 at 17:34
  • 1
    @larnu What will you do to improve this meta question if you were the poster of this meta question? you see I am improving and really trying to. Sep 6 at 17:53
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    I think you can safely expect that people will read the comments either in full or not at all. The same goes for the Answers. There's no reason to repeat information. This isn't like a forum or a chat. I read the "you see I am improving and really trying to" a total of 3 times. Also, do not expect people to respond. They may or may not. Sometimes someone else will respond.. or not :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 6 at 18:01
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    You asked me that 27 minutes prior to that comment, @Gomesz785 ...
    – Larnu
    Sep 6 at 18:01
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    Standard comment of mine: . Please before considering posting read the manual & google any error message & many clear, concise & precise phrasings of your question/problem/goal, with & without your particular names/strings/numbers, 'site:stackoverflow.com' & tags; read many answers. Reflect your research. See How to Ask, Help center & the voting arrow mouseover texts. If you post a question, use one phrasing as title.
    – philipxy
    Sep 6 at 23:26
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    You are suffering from tutorial-driven-development I think. Get a good book.
    – Gimby
    Sep 7 at 14:26
-14

Your first question is too trivial. Everybody knows that location.href jumps the browser to another page.

Your second question is a "debug my code" question, these are generally disliked. The reason of the dislike is that they are mostly "do my work instead me", packaged as question. Another reason that even if you get the answer (where is the bug), it won't be useful for the googlers of the future. It is useful only for you, here and now.

I am not sure, what should happen to them. Clearly neither of them are the question of the century. Are they enough bad to close them, downvote them, delete them and sow their place with salt? No, I think not. The correct solution would be, if you would get the answer from someone who wants to give the single-sentence answer to your first question, and debug your code in the second. But I would not give rep for these questions.

The solution for you, on the long term: try to find your answers on other ways (like googling with site:stackoverflow.com :-) ), and try to answer questions. The latter is also useful because having high rep or active answering activity might help against the Q-ban (note: no one knows the exact rules, only the company). Another reason is that writing answers, you also learn, how to write well-received questions.

0
12

This one could be summed up as:

What does this code do?

<script>
location.href='http://www.example.com';
</script>

If you researched anything, it's certainly not evident on the question itself. It's hard to imagine a JS developer not knowing what location.href is, nor knowing how to find it. I'm not sure there is a "good" question there to be salvaged and edited.

The lesson on this one would be "spend more time getting to know the basics of the technology you are working with before you post a question about a specific issue".

On this one it looks like you learnt enough of the language to know how to define a function, while managing not to learn that a function is an encapsulated block of callable code that you have to actually call.

This is something I would close as "typo or not reproducible". Maybe you copied some code without really understanding it, and just a hint in a comment was all that was needed to help you. (There used to be a comment or two under the question telling you exactly that, but they were deleted since). This is not a question that could be useful for future visitors, so I don't see that it could be improved in any way.


In my opinion, sadly, you need to let both questions go. Delete them and forget them, since I don't see any way to edit them so they get better reception (unless you change them into completely different questions, but if you are able to post new, good quality questions, no need to salvage these two).

4
  • The python one, genuinely I couldn't find the reason after 2 hours of googling and one post on reddit. Sep 6 at 17:43
  • >This is something I would close as "typo or not reproducible". Maybe you copied some code without really understanding it, and just a hint in a comment was all that was needed to help you. This is not a question that could be useful for future visitors, so I don't see that it could be improved in any way. | I coded that one from the scratch. Sep 6 at 17:43
  • 8
    Then it seems you are skipping steps in your learning of the language. Spend more time going through tutorials and documentation before attempting to write something on your own where you need to ask questions about it.
    – yivi
    Sep 6 at 17:44
  • @Gomesz785 The code question can be improved by an appropriate [mre] to a point where it might not merit downvotes, though it would still merit closure either as a typo for not calling a function or a duplicate about having to call functions. But then you wouldn't have to delete to avoid more downvotes, and both downvotes & deleting count towards posting restrictions. Although it might still be downvoted as "not useful".
    – philipxy
    Sep 7 at 0:21
5

I'm hoping that I'm not sounding too blunt here, but I'm not sure that much can be done to improve them to the point that I personally at least would be willing to upvote or vote to reopen. In the Python question, for example, the question you actually ask is effectively a typo (because you never actually call either function), and it's arguably too broad and lacking in research or debugging effort (because there are numerous other problems that you don't ask about, and many of the problems could probably have been resolved by using a step debugger).

6
  • The python one, genuinely I couldn't find the reason after 2 hours of googling and one post on reddit. Sep 6 at 17:40
  • 3
    @Gomesz785 Did you read the Python tutorial? :)
    – Scratte
    Sep 6 at 17:41
  • Could you please view the original thing as well: meta.stackoverflow.com/revisions/411321/1 Sep 6 at 17:41
  • 3
    @Gomesz785 I'm not trying to be smart or anything, but I think you need to work a little on your google-foo. This is what I found from Python tutorial in DuckDuckGo. The first link seems promising.. it goes to The Python Tutorial
    – Scratte
    Sep 6 at 17:44
  • @scrattle well it is the w3 thing not a standard one. good resource. Sep 6 at 17:45
  • 1
    BeginnersGuide Programmers have a full list of various tutorials. I think there's no shortage of those really. It takes time to go through one, but if you want to learn, you have to do it. And practicing your google-foo is going to help you be a programmer, because you need it and use that all the time.
    – Scratte
    Sep 6 at 17:49

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