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I have seen some users put another license on their content posted on Stack Overflow. Some dedicate it to the public domain or use CC0 by stating that in their SE profile. Judging by some other meta posts like this one, it seems to be a valid thing. I was/am also considering doing the same and add CC0. But I was wondering what happens if all users do the same? Can someone create a replica of Stack Overflow without any legal problems then?

Update after reading comments

I mean without giving any attribution.

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    Well, you know, people can create an SO replica now, they just need to follow proper attribution as per CC-by-SA license, that's it. And partial clones do exist - putting a different license on the code someone posts to SO does not remove the CC-by-SA license. Sep 4 at 17:39
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    Nor does posting one's own content in a different forum under a different license change the constraint that content sourced from Stack Overflow must still abide by the CC-by-SA license. Sep 4 at 17:41
  • @RobertHarvey, then what's the benefit of adding CC0 to one's own content if it still needs to abide by the more restrictive CC-by-SA?
    – a5hk
    Sep 4 at 17:45
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    That maneuver won't have any effect here, since you have to agree to the CC-by-SA license when you post content here. But if you authored the content, you can post it anywhere else you like, using any license you like that is compatible with that venue's terms of service. It is your content, after all. Sep 4 at 17:46
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    @a5hk if it makes things clearer: the license relationships are contravariant, not covariant. If you add a less restrictive license, it allows everyone to use the content without proper attribution, for example. If you add a more restrictive license, it is in effect only insofar as it does not violate CC-by-SA. Sep 4 at 17:48
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    Spoken like a true software developer. Sep 4 at 17:50
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    @RobertHarvey aren't we on SO, after all? :) I am sure there's going to be some discussion on license variance here pretty soon Sep 4 at 17:52
  • @OlegValter, so you are saying that adding less restrictive license will have some effects? I mean I think its contradictory to "That maneuver won't have any effect here".
    – a5hk
    Sep 4 at 17:54
  • @a5hk CC0 serves a purpose of making the licensing requirements less restrictive, so yup. Imagine I posted an answer. Then, another Monica-gate happens, and I no longer want to associate my name with the Stack Exchange network. If my content is only licensed with CC-by-SA (whatever version SE decides to use), everyone who uses or quotes my work is required to provide a link to my network profile, my username, etc. By dual-licensing with CC0 I would make it so that anyone can freely use my work without worrying about attribution and thus associating my name with the network. Something like that Sep 4 at 18:06
  • @OlegValter I'm not entirely sure about the "not proper attribution"-part. The ownership still needs to be honored. I'm pretty sure the only difference CC0 makes is that there's no requirement to state the license, but attribution is still required. There's also no requirement for share-alike, meaning you can put it into proprietary stuff.
    – Scratte
    Sep 4 at 18:06
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    @Scratte no, you do not have to attribute the person under CC0. That's the idea. See, e.g., CC0 FAQ: "Do I have to attribute the person who applied CC0 to their work?" - "No, there is no legal requirement that you attribute the affirmer, only an expectation that you will voluntarily do so if requested. The CC0 deed provides HTML code that can be copy and pasted into your webpage to easily cite the author and the work, if that information has been provided by the affirmer." Sep 4 at 18:09
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    @OlegValter Please note that CC0 is invalid in major parts of the world, including Europe. Attribution is always required in Europe.
    – Scratte
    Sep 4 at 18:09
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    @Scratte it does not take away the fact that licensing under CC0 does not imply the need for proper attribution Sep 4 at 18:10
  • After re-reading other related questions/answers and comments here, My understanding is that to create a site with contents similar to SO but with CC0 license safely, all users must have also posted their contents somewhere else with CC0 and then the person who wants to create that site must obtain the contents from those places.
    – a5hk
    Sep 4 at 19:46
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    Just a note that any and all legal advice you get on licensing from an internet source such as Meta Stack Overflow is worth the amount you paid for it; which is to say, not a whole heck of a lot. The opinions expressed in comments and answers are those of the authors of those posts and should not be taken as legal advice from Stack Overflow or the members there of. Certainly not me, anyway. Sep 5 at 19:13
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A small excurse into licensing world

Licensing is a form of waiving some of the rights you have as an author of a piece of work. By default, when you create something that's not a part of your employment responsibilities (as employment complicates matters significantly), the work belongs to you, and you alone. Licensing allows you, as an author, to relinquish this right to some extent (in some jurisdictions you cannot waive some rights - this is particularly true for the European Union law) to make the work usable by others.

Multiple licensing is, therefore, a way of providing others with options as to what rights you are willing to waive. However, as with rights, not all licenses are created equal, and thus some are incompatible with each other (you can find the CC-* license compatibility table in the Creative Commons FAQ). Since they essentially are combinations of waivers, the relationship between additional licenses and the original one, in general, flows from less permissive to more permissive.

About the CC-BY-SA licenses

CC-BY-SA (Stack Exchange uses version 4.0 as of 2021) belongs to the family of permissive open-source "share-alike" licenses which allows unrestricted sharing and adaptation of your work under the following conditions (note the necessity for proper attribution without indication of endorsement):

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

ShareAlike — If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same license as the original.

About CC0 license

CC0 is an even more permissive (essentially a public domain) license which allows one to completely waive all rights to the work (insofar as the jurisdiction allows such waivers, of course - any rights one cannot waive simply stay non-relinquished) in the interest of public use (hence "public domain"). Thus, CC0 license also does not inherently bear restrictions on attribution (see the corresponding section of the CC0 FAQ).

How does all this apply to the question?

CC0 is a less restrictive license and thus compatible with the CC-BY-SA family (and, generally, with all CC-BY licenses with an exception to the "no derivatives" ones like CC-BY-ND) of licenses (again, see the compatibility table). This means that when you encounter a claim in someone's profile that they license all their work here under a CC0 license, this is a permission to you to freely use, distribute and modify it without any restriction including attribution to the extent allowed by law (so please do keep it in mind as you might be required to attribute regardless).

And, just in case, incorporating my original comment:

@a5hk CC0 serves a purpose of making the licensing requirements less restrictive, so yup. Imagine I posted an answer. Then, another Monica-gate happens, and I no longer want to associate my name with the Stack Exchange network. If my content is only licensed with CC-by-SA (whatever version SE decides to use), everyone who uses or quotes my work is required to provide a link to my network profile, my username, etc. By dual-licensing with CC0 I would make it so that anyone can freely use my work without worrying about attribution and thus associating my name with the network. Something like that

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