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In the "Low quality answer queue", I came upon this audit, which I marked as "Acceptable". However, it was recently deleted by Community because it was flagged as spam or offensive content.

I am trying to understand why it was marked as such. The question does have a link, but to the same domain with the same products as that in the original post. Neither am I able to find anything offensive about this post.

In case you are not able to see it, I'll attach a screenshot. What am I missing?


The consensus seems to be that the answer qualified as spam, as the author did not reveal their affiliation. However, there is now a current answer with the same issue. In this case, I edited the answer by adding the affiliation. Is this the correct procedure?

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  • 2
    Any time you see offsite links in LQP, be suspicious and investigate further. Or if you do not want to, just skip the review task.
    – yivi
    Sep 4 at 9:19
  • You marked a answer that had been deleted before you even reviewed the answer as acceptable? If it was deleted that means it wasn’t acceptable. Opening the question, in another tab, will prevent you failing audits in this manner. The audit was there to make sure you were paying attention Sep 4 at 10:27
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    @SecurityHound, I'm not looking for a way to "bypass" the audit. I'm trying to understand why that question was marked as spam. As Robert Longson writes, the author of the answer is affiliated with the domain the link points to. Is checking for affiliations part of the "Low quality answers" queue?
    – mhovd
    Sep 4 at 12:32
  • @mhovd - Selecting the proper review action by looking to see if it's been deleted, isn't bypassing the audit/review, now if you want to ask about why a specific answer was deleted that's a different question. "Is checking for affiliations part of the "Low-quality answers" queue?" - Absolutely. Sep 4 at 17:35
  • The link you just added points to the deleted answer.
    – yivi
    Sep 7 at 16:27
  • Thanks for letting me know @yivi, I have updated the link, which was to the current accepted answer in the original question.
    – mhovd
    Sep 7 at 16:30
  • Good. And you added a question. If you have follow up questions, you can post a new question. Please try to search first to see if the question you'd want to ask was not asked before, just in case.
    – yivi
    Sep 7 at 16:31
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Visit the answerer's profile. There you'll see

Support Developer at Aspose

That's not disclosed in the answer, but the promotion rules are quite clear that...

...you must disclose your affiliation in your answers

So presumably that's why this answer was flagged as spam and thereby deleted. Non-disclosure of affiliation is sometimes quite hard to spot, it may require some investigation into the poster.

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    I don't understand why it's not fine to post a comment asking them to disclose the affiliation before deleting the post.
    – Scratte
    Sep 4 at 12:14
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    Am I supposed to check the profile for each member that posts a link in their answer for possible affiliations? Is this something the audit process requires?
    – mhovd
    Sep 4 at 12:25
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    You should check for spam and plagiarism. Sep 4 at 12:30
  • @Scratte if the author cares to fix the post they can flag it so a moderator can undelete it. Why would we want to keep an unacceptable post around, that just encourages more people to do the same. Sep 4 at 12:33
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    @RobertLongson That's something one learns after having read meta for a year or so. No new user is going to know they can do that.
    – Scratte
    Sep 4 at 12:50
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The account has, to date, posted 4 answers. Each linked to their product page (not the documentation), and did not disclose their affiliation. Unfortunately, theirs is not the first account to do this; there have been sporadic spam runs to astroturf the company for at least 2 years now. Some of those incidents were very blatantly trying to bypass spam detection, others just pose as developers with a half-way there solution that fails to address the question directly but only shows how their product could be used.

As such, this is not an isolated incident, the company has to work on regaining the trust of the community and train their developer advocates or support engineers to not only post to promote their product. So, what you might be missing here is the wider context.

Note that they have shown that they do know the rules of this site at some point in the past, as one of their dev advocate managed to disclose their affiliation in (most) of their posts. Another account, currently active, discloses their affiliation correctly, and has been doing this since 2015. However, there also have been a number of accounts that we either had to warn about their posting behaviour, or have outright removed as spam accounts.

We have contacted this account to let them know about how our site works.

As to what you can do as a reviewer: if you see any posts in the queue that link to a product, even in a related tag, it is worth your time to check for warning signs:

  • Is the answer referencing the question asked at all, or are they jumping straight into use product X?

  • If they do address the question, are they linking to their product page, or to relevant documentation?

  • A single post by an account that discloses their link in to the company in their profile may be okay, or there may be deleted posts.

  • The product could have a history of problematic astroturfing; you can check if the product name shows up on MetaSmoke, or you could ask in the Charcoal HQ chat room if there is a known history.

If I wasn't a moderator, if I came across a post like this I'd add a comment to the answer to inform the user of our our disclosure policy. Because this specific case is an audit, that'd reveal the post as deleted already.

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  • Thanks for the answer! When I checked his account, I could only see that one answer. Given that the domain was the same in the question and answer, I considered the answer relevant and "OK". Given the information you just gave I agree with you, but how am I supposed to know the backstory of the account / company during an audit?
    – mhovd
    Sep 4 at 12:58
  • @mhovd a single audit failure isn't the end of the world, but in this case you only needed to look at the answerer's profile. Is that information presented to you directly? No. That's why it takes time and care to do reviews and why we have audits to check you're on the right track, although even audits can be wrong sometimes. The system isn't perfect, just try your best, take time and care with each review and you'll likely be fine. Sep 4 at 13:02
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    @mhovd: you can't always know the back story; that's the downside of our community's excellent track record at keeping out spammers. One thing you could do is see if there are any records of the product being astroturfed in MetaSmoke, a site built by the Charcoal community to catch spam and other problem posts. Or you could ask in the Charcoal HQ chat room if the domain may be from a known astroturfing company.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 13:07
  • @mhovd One other tip is to visit the link. You'll note the "Pricing" link on the page, indicating there's a paid version of this. It's not foolproof, but it can help identify spam.
    – Machavity Mod
    Sep 4 at 14:18
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    Still, the answer contains a solution in the code, and the OP asked for a solution using the product.
    – mhovd
    Sep 4 at 14:28
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    But shouldn't the other answer to the same question contain a disclosure too? The profile of it's answerer tells "I am working as Support developer/ Evangelist at Aspose". Or is it reference in the post which matters? (deleted answer points to the product's page, but given answer points to the product forum's page?
    – Tsyvarev
    Sep 4 at 17:24
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    @Tsyvarev: that answer doesn't link to a product page or direct you to try a product. It's not a great answer by a long shot, but it falls within our guidelines for companies supporting users on Stack Overflow; we don't require support staff to identify as such on every answer that they post.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 17:48
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    Oh, so it is a link to the product page which matters: without it (and without other form of the product's recommendation), a disclosure could be useful, but is not required. It seems that now I truly understand that policy, and it is actually has a sense for me. Thanks.
    – Tsyvarev
    Sep 4 at 18:29
-22

Extending Robert Longson's answer with some details:

The answerer has a rep1, clearly showing that he does not know yet this directive.

He is also openly a worker of the Aspose company, clearly showing that he does not try to hide this.

This is clearly not a behavior of a spammer. He just did not know this rule. The correct way is to warn him in a comment and get away. Possibly an upvote can be considered (the answer is clearly useful).


Furthermore, with some SEDE querying + using my recently earned 10k has made for me possible to check the typical votetype4-deleted posts (these are auto-deleted and locked as spam or rudeness). Their overwhelming majority is not a spam or rude. The typical is that these are not answers (like crap text or so). Sometimes they are perfectly correct answers deleted by pure and hostile power misuse.


Unfortunately, both the company and the mods ignore the problem. The company has more important things to do, like creating various inclusivity directives and similars. And the mods are held in check by the hostile power users of the meta sites.

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    What evidence do you have to attribute intent? deleted by pure and hostile power misuse is quite a leap. Can you share any such posts and why you think they should not have been deleted?
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 12:33
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    In your first paragraph, you clearly state that such behaviour is not allowed, but then it looks like you complain about moderators enforcing this rule. If a post was added against this rule, then it makes sense to delete it, isn't it?
    – Dharman
    Sep 4 at 12:40
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    @MartijnPieters You can check the VoteType4 deleted posts even without the SEDE. Check the last 10-20 VoteType4 deletions and look, how many of them were really spam or rude. I really can not see a reason to argument about facts.
    – peterh
    Sep 4 at 15:20
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    The first part of this post is definitely an answer. The rest, I don't think is relevant here. If you think some users are misusing flags, then gather evidence and create a separate meta-post.
    – Dharman
    Sep 4 at 15:27
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    No one has voted to delete this answer yet. Even if this answer gets deleted by 3 users then good riddance. Honestly, I don't see much value in it. It just reads like a rant. If you want to prevent deletion, then remove 2/3 of this post.
    – Dharman
    Sep 4 at 15:33
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    @Dharman Yes, you can say this. But fact is that an useful main site answer were deleted by flagging misuse, and its rep1 op was likely deterred from using the site any more. And this post - complaining about it - will be also deleted by delete votes misuse. Your current side talk might mislead the readers of the future from the essence of the problem, but it does not solve the fact that there were multiple power misuses and nothing happened against them.
    – peterh
    Sep 4 at 15:41
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    @peterh: it took my a while to realise that by VoteType4 you meant that you are looking at a SEDE query against the Votes table with WHERE VoteTypeId = 4. I created my own quick-n-dirty version just so I could see what you are talking about. I don't see any 'malicious deletes' here. If you are wondering about the C# question deletions, those are for a repeat troll account, where we have adviced the community to use R/A to speed up handling. Also, posts can be deleted for other reasons, the flags declined or ignored.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 17:02
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    @peterh: if you have more specific examples in mind, then yes, you do need to bring evidence. We are arguing about facts because you are making a claim, and I am asking you to provide specific examples.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 17:02
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    @peterh: on the whole, it looks to me that you are conflating the mere presence of a R/A vote on a deleted post as evidence that the post was deleted because of the flag. If so, that's an incorrect assumption. Next, the R/A vote is also used for "abusing the site" posts, such as entire nonsense posts. Finally, for spam posts, you need VoteTypeId = 12.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 17:14
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    @MartijnPieters 68968859: looks pretty okay question, might be closed but not spam/rude. 68965621 is NAA but not spam/rude. 68952325 is a meta question, might be closed/downvote here but not spam/rude. 68952098 looks pretty okay, possibly closable/downvotable but not spam/rude. 68948113 is gibberish crap, possibly spam seed, border case. 68936686 is the same what many people rightfully think about this whole community :-), but I admit saying this so is an own goal. 68946082 is pretty okay, might be closed/deleted but not spam/rude. 68946082 is gibberish crap but not spam/rude.
    – peterh
    Sep 4 at 17:26
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    @MartijnPieters I checked the last 10 posts in your query. If I see it well, about 6 is clearly a misuse in the list. That is all. Here is your proof. And also the question (on the top) refers a proof: a deleted, useful answer, which was deleted as spam/rude, only because the OP did not disclose his affiliation to the subject in his post, only in his profile page.
    – peterh
    Sep 4 at 17:29
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    @peterh: and I already told you there is no such proof there. There are: 1 answer insulting someone for using PHP, one C# troll post, one answer insulting a moderator, two posts with nonsense, one question asking how to hack into Stack Overflow to learn who downvoted their post, one that ended in repeated nonsense text to bypass code-only limitations, one spam post shilling for hacking services, one answer cussing about downvotes, one bigoted post about how women can't code. Any specific ones you had in mind here?
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 17:45
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    @MartijnPieters Saying nonsense is not rude. On the current rules, saying nonsense qualifies for nothing, OP would even get back the lost rep (due to downs) as his post gets deleted. It might lead to an automatic Q/A ban, that is all. However, saying rude is a hard thing, it leads to a -100 and possibly to mod intervention (warn or suspension). The difference is huge. Deleting nonsense as rude is a misuse. Deleting good (possibly offtopic) posts as rude is a yet more serious power misuse. 68968859, 68952325, 68952098, 68946082 probably should have not even deleted.
    – peterh
    Sep 4 at 17:49
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    @peterh: on R/A on nonsense posts, see What are the “spam” and “rude or abusive” (offensive) flags, and how do they work?. 68968859 and 68946082 are both C# troll posts, I gave you some context already on that. 68952325 is another troll, of a different kind, and that sort of post is an abuse of the site, and so is the repeated text at the end of 68952098.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 4 at 17:55
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    @peterh - We will have to disagree that the content you are pointing out is was improperly deleted. Context is key and it appears you lack some context on the reason those flags were used. It's a shame your new ability to see deleted content has not provided that context, hopefully, in time you will get the proper context on the reason some of that content was properly flagged as spam or rude. Sep 4 at 18:02

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