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I created a minimal reproducible example related to a question on merging dataframes.

Someone answered it in a way that works on the shared example data, but not on the actual much larger dataframes not shared.

Is there a guide on how to debug or how to deduce the logic of data representation?

Is there a guide on how to represent large datasets in a minimal reproducible way or the logic of deduction when trying to represent large datasets?

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  • "Is there a guide on SO what to do when answer works on minimal reproducible example but not local data?" - yes, it's called downvoting and adding a comment-reply explaining that it doesn't work and to request an improvement.
    – Dai
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 7:32
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    If it works on the MCVE that the asker provided, but not on “local data”/“local code”, it would point at the MCVE being at fault and not capturing the problem correctly.
    – yivi
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 7:41
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    If the minimal reproducible example is not sowing the behaviour intended, it's not a "reproducible" example, now is it?
    – VLAZ
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 7:44
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    Asking a new follow-up question might be worthwhile. Punishing answerers of the original question because you failed to outline your constraints is not going to work well in the long run. Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 7:49
  • It is not reproducible then and i agree that downvoting would be counterproductive. I agree with the last three comments. I think i have to restate my question then to something more specific?! "Is there a guide on how to represent large dataframes in minimal reproducible way / according to most different systems design?"
    – id345678
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 7:50
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    Remove data from the dataset gradually, checking each time that the testcase is still reproducible. If some removal results in the testcase not working then reinstate it and remove something else instead. When there's absolutely nothing that can be removed, you have your minimal data set. Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 7:59
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    @Dai: Are you suggesting downvoting an answer that meets all the requirements in the question, simply because the question doesn't adequately capture the actual requirements? That sounds pretty hostile to me.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 8:49
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    @JonSkeet No, not at all. With reference to "an answer that meets all the requirements in the question" my reading of the OP's post was that the OP meant that the question did describe all of the requirements textually, but their sample data didn't cover all cases; so an answer that only covers any sample data but which does not "meet all the requirements" in the post doesn't actually answer the question and I thought we're meant to downvote answers that-don't-actually-answer-the-question? (but never without posting a comment to the answer explaining why it doesn't answer the question).
    – Dai
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 9:16
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    @Dai: Ah - I don't see anything in the question suggesting that. It sounds to me like it's just referring to a question with insufficient information to mirror the reality. I would suggest that even in the case you describe, I wouldn't downvote but would comment, unless it was really obviously not meeting the textual requirements of the question. (I'd comment, but not downvote.) It's very easy to miss one requirement out of 10, for example, and if the mcve doesn't test that requirement, that feels more like a problem with the question. (And it doesn't mean the answer isn't at all helpful.)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 10:10

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Is there a guide on how to debug or how to deduce the logic of data representation?

Not sure what you mean by that, but why don't you do the following:

  • Take the solution to the previous minimal example from the answer
  • Apply it to the local data
  • From that produce a new minimal example with your local data
  • Ask for that in a new question also referring to the old question

But before doing that you should make sure that:

  • The old minimal example was in truth a minimal example of something (i.e. it really failed in some meaningful sense). If needed adapt the text of the previous question to exactly fit the minimal example given at the time.

What you will get in the end is:

  • A solution to a problem specified by the previous minimal example.
  • A solution to another problem specified by the new minimal example.

Sometimes problems can be complex and minimal examples can result in only capturing part of the whole problem. That isn't bad by itself. You and others will still learn something from it (i.e. how to solve a part of the problem and with your next question also how to solve the remaining part of your problem).

A good strategy for avoiding capturing only details of a problem is to remove data until the problem vanishes then going back one step. The minimal example on the minimal data set should fail but should also still fail on the full data set.

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    Thanks Trilarion. I think i acidentally started (also denglish speaker) a discussion that shows, most people misunderstood me. Although it might seem obvious to some people but this is the stuff i was looking for. Robert Longson wrote this counterintuitive response in the comments above. ""Remove data from the dataset gradually, checking each time that the testcase is still reproducible. If some removal results in the testcase not working then reinstate it and remove something else instead. When there's absolutely nothing that can be removed, you have your minimal data set.""
    – id345678
    Commented Aug 29, 2021 at 10:23

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