-38

tl:dr;

In short, I'm suggesting users of "sufficient" reputation should be able to access the unmoderated version of comments, at the press of a button/link.


original

I'm writing this because I believe moderating comments without any sort of transparency is inherently wrong and I haven't found an open discussion about it.

I understand that one of the purposes of censoring comments is removing the parts which might be deemed offensive by others but that is, in my opinion, too broad and therefore a flawed approach, for at least the following reasons:

  • No matter how skilled moderators are, they have no technical means of knowing what other people might find offensive (it depends on education, culture and context, and differs from person to person). It's not a matter of if they get it wrong. It's a matter of how much they get it wrong, on average.
  • It violates the right to freely express convictions and opinions
  • At times it impedes truthful and forthright communication, which is a very useful tool for solving problems, especially the ones of a technical nature
  • In order to be able to think, one has to risk being offensive. thinking runs the risk of offending anyone who thinks differently, but it's the main engine of our evolution, both as individuals and as species
  • We don't come here to be treated as helpless, defenseless and incompetent children; we come here because we want to become the exact opposite of that. Asking a question here is the equivalent of stating:
    "Here's a problem which makes me feel stupid and incompetent. I'd like to learn how to solve it so that tomorrow I'll be less stupid and more competent."

In the case of questions and answers, a user (with a fairly low amount of reputation) has access to the original text but, in the case of comments, non-moderators have no access to the original source.

Maybe we could have some more transparency on the censorship process, maybe we should differentiate between types of offensiveness and maybe we could give users the ability to opt into seeing the uncensored version of the content, at the risk of being offended, in the off-chance they might be more mature than moderators might consider them to be.

Maybe we could stop treating users as helpless, immature and defenseless. Maybe we could invest some trust in their ability to act responsibly and give them the opportunity to exercise this ability.

37
  • 16
    You lost me at "censorship".
    – Cerbrus
    Aug 25 at 13:51
  • 26
    "I understand the main purpose of censoring comments is removing the parts which might be deemed offensive by others", No, it's primarily used to remove noise and off-topic conversation.
    – Cerbrus
    Aug 25 at 13:52
  • 11
    What exactly are you asking for? It's very unclear, IMO. Reads a bit like a rant, without any actionable points.
    – yivi
    Aug 25 at 13:53
  • 5
    Please see what comments are actually for. They have a very narrow purpose, mainly to help improve what matters on SO - questions and answers. Aug 25 at 13:55
  • 14
    "Maybe we could stop treating users as helpless, immature and defenseless". I don't think anyone is "treating" users like that. Not sure what you are projecting about. The vast majority of deleted comments are deleted because other users flagged them. Not because a third party silently decided to act on their behalf.
    – yivi
    Aug 25 at 13:55
  • 13
    So, you want an unmoderated chat room. That's not what SO it is about.
    – yivi
    Aug 25 at 13:57
  • 15
    "I'm asking for the ability to be able to have an honest and helpful conversation with any other user" That's explicitly not what SO is for. Aug 25 at 13:57
  • 9
    " guess I'm asking for the ability to be able to have an honest and helpful conversation with any other user" That exists, it's called chat. it's not what the comments are for.
    – Larnu
    Aug 25 at 14:08
  • 4
    Then your feature request is due for a significant rewrite / re-tag.
    – Cerbrus
    Aug 25 at 14:12
  • 8
    I don't want offensive content to be easily accessible, thank you. If someone posts a bigoted view, or an insult, there is nothing to gain for that content to be easily accessible. By "being able to read the original", you are basically asking unmoderated comments. No thanks.
    – yivi
    Aug 25 at 14:13
  • 5
    Why should blatant insults get "soft-deleted" like this? Same for gibberish? Spam? And if that shouldn't be visible with that feature, where do you draw the line? How is that not going to result in the same discussion again?
    – Cerbrus
    Aug 25 at 14:17
  • 4
    Will not happen. It's a waste of dev time. Comments are second-class citizens, introduced later to make people stop posting answers to ask an OP for clarification. Aug 25 at 14:29
  • 14
    Assuming I've correctly identified the answer on which you had an issue about comments, the only thing which was edited out of an (auto-flagged) comment by a moderator was "Must be some [derogatory description] from [somewhere].", posted in response to you asking the downvote on your answer to be explained. The other user substantially misrepresented what they said when complaining about being edited (misrepresenting such is typical). The moderator left the rest of the comment, presumably because it had some redeeming content (hidden in somewhat less derogatory characterization of others).
    – Makyen Mod
    Aug 25 at 15:01
  • 16
    All of your bullet point are wrong, but in particular: "It violates the right to freely express convictions and opinions" you have no "right" to 'freely expression your convictions or opinions' here on Stack Overflow enumerated in any law or even any site/network/company rule.
    – TylerH
    Aug 25 at 15:14
  • 7
    You can get curated version of insults from meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/326494/… if you feel that you are not insulted enough at the moment. Aug 25 at 16:35
13

In order to be able to think, one has to risk being offensive. thinking runs the risk of offending anyone who thinks differently, but it's the main engine of our evolution, both as individuals and as species

I believe this to be the root issue behind this feature request. It is even validated by a comment from a moderator which reveals why the comment which sparked the feature request was moderated.

[...] the only thing which was edited out of an (auto-flagged) comment by a moderator was "Must be some [derogatory description] from [somewhere].", posted in response to you asking the downvote on your answer to be explained. The other user substantially misrepresented what they said when complaining about being edited (misrepresenting such is typical). The moderator left the rest of the comment, presumably because it had some redeeming content (hidden in somewhat less derogatory characterization of others).

You seem to have a problem with the heavy handed moderation of heated comments in the site. However, this site has a near-zero tolerance for things which are unquestionably offensive or otherwise inappropriate in a professional setting.

The idea that "one has to risk being offensive" is highly problematic. It is one thing to say that some people will feel offended by certain actions or constructive comments when in their nature they are not (downvotes and close votes for example). But it is another to admit having to be offensive to make a point, and in that regard that is naturally not what should be defended here. In fact, if one cannot make a point without being constructive and respectful in the process, it's best not to do it at all.

Indeed, in this example, there was a better way: "Must be some [derogatory description] from [somewhere]." was not only belittling towards the downvoter(s), but also completely non-constructive, so it had to go. That the moderator saved the rest of a comment was a plus, and usually only done when they feel that the rest is still useful and worth keeping for a little longer. This was the exception, rather than the norm.

Heated comments should not stay on the site for long, because they are not professional, do not contribute to the quality of the site, and can ultimately be a cause for people to throw tantrums and cause real mental harm. This unfortunately does happen, regardless of how many times the code of conduct is raised and regardless of the number of suspensions issued.

We actively hunt down heat to be flagged and removed from the site. Multiple mechanisms are in place to find and take down heat as soon as possible. They are much more of a problem than the problem this feature request attempts to resolve. Enabling anyone else other than moderators to see these comments would then be counter-productive.

So no, let's not gamble with offensive content.

14

This question is filled with incorrect assumptions that need to be addressed. I hope that once these are corrected, you'll better understand how the site and the feature work.

No matter how skilled moderators are, they have no technical means of knowing what other people might find offensive (it depends on education, culture and context, and differs from person to person). It's not a matter of if they get it wrong. It's a matter of how much they get it wrong, on average.

I'm not sure what "technical skill" has to do with anything; the Code of Conduct and moderator policy guides moderators to delete content that users find offensive. Users alert moderators of this via flags. The moderator reviewing the flag does not have to agree that it is offensive, only acknowledge that a user found it offensive. Now, moderators may exercise some judgment (in the case of troll flags or some other abuse of the flag method)... that's why we have moderators, otherwise all flags would just be automatically handled when a user raises one.

It violates the right to freely express convictions and opinions

You do not have any right to this. Your rights are only what are enumerated in the Stack Overflow/Stack Exchange website Terms of Service. If you are thinking of the US Constitutional right to freedom of speech, that only applies to government entities, not private websites.

At times it impedes truthful and forthright communication, which is a very useful tool for solving problems, especially the ones of a technical nature

Telling the truth or being forthright are not impeded by disallowing rude or offensive content. You can get your point across without being rude, cursing, resorting to condescension, etc. If you feel like you can't, then frankly you need to try harder (or step away; remember there's no "requirement" that you respond to any comment on the site).

In order to be able to think, one has to risk being offensive. thinking runs the risk of offending anyone who thinks differently, but it's the main engine of our evolution, both as individuals and as species

I'm sorry, what? This entire bullet point is a complete non-sequitur.

We don't come here to be treated as helpless, defenseless and incompetent children; we come here because we want to become the exact opposite of that. Asking a question here is the equivalent of stating:

"Here's a problem which makes me feel stupid and incompetent. I'd like to learn how to solve it so that tomorrow I'll be less stupid and more competent."

That's not true, and is needlessly self-deprecating (and, ironically, could be offensive to some users). When I have a question or a problem, it doesn't mean I feel stupid or incompetent. That's a very negative and defeatist viewpoint. Not knowing something does not mean you are stupid, it simply means you are ignorant of that thing.

Maybe we could have some more transparency on the censorship process

The comment privilege page clearly and comprehensively covers what comments are, when to use them, and how you should treat them.

Maybe we could stop treating users as helpless, immature and defenseless. Maybe we could invest some trust in their ability to act responsibly and give them the opportunity to exercise this ability.

I agree; I think we can. It starts with you not treating yourself as helpless, immature, and defenseless, first.

7
  • 1
    I don't think I'm treating myself as helpless, immature and defenseless. If I was, I probably wouldn't have asked for the ability to access content which moderators thought might offend me. Could you explain why you are implying I am?
    – tao
    Aug 25 at 16:13
  • 3
    @tao Is that not what you meant when you said we are treating users as helpless, immature, and defenseless? Do you not lump yourself in with "users"? Also your quote about asking a question means users must "feel stupid and incompetent".
    – TylerH
    Aug 25 at 16:20
  • I had a comment exchange with some other user. It wasn't real-time, but stretched upon a day or two, possibly due to timezone. Their comment got auto-flagged and modified before I could read it. And its not the first time. At which point I felt "SO" didn't treat me as capable and mature enough to read the comment which was clearly addressed to me, but sheltered me from something which might have offended me. I might be wrong here but the feeling I get from it all is that SO doesn't really respect me, nor does it trust me to act maturely or responsibly. Which I think I do.
    – tao
    Aug 25 at 16:30
  • What I don't get from your logic is: if I consider SO has sheltered me from something I don't want to be sheltered from, how does that mean I'm treating myself as helpless, immature and defenseless? I treat myself as the opposite and I'd kindly ask SO to treat me the same.
    – tao
    Aug 25 at 16:32
  • 2
    @tao SO moderation policies aren't about you, though, tThey're about content. It doesn't matter whether someone was saying something to you (or to me)... if it was in violation of the Code of Conduct (or against the rules for what comments are for), then it gets deleted. If it's that important, you can ask the commenter to re-submit the comment without any offending content included. So it isn't a matter of whether you are being respected or not, but a matter of whether the comment respects the rules.
    – TylerH
    Aug 25 at 18:03
  • @tao comments aren't for you, they are for everyone. I'll have to be yet another person to point out that what you want is a chatroom with the user. That way you'd get directly what you want. Your proposal is an XY problem at best. And seeking to justify the Y with completely irrelevant reasoning.
    – VLAZ
    Aug 25 at 18:04
  • Fair point. the more I think about it, the more I realize implementing this feature would not lead to a better outcome overall, which is why I marked @E_net's answer as accepted. I also find it quite well articulated and focused on the root of the problem, while pursuing the best possible outcome. I also realize my stance on non-transparent moderation is probably blown out of proportion and I guess it stems from me being born and raised in an ex-communist country, where censorship was the norm.
    – tao
    Aug 25 at 18:15
6

Comments on SE are meant to:

  • Request clarification from the author;
  • Leave constructive criticism that guides the author in improving the post;
  • Add relevant but minor or transient information to a post (e.g. a link to a related question, or an alert to the author that the question has been updated).

(source)

Anything outside of that is subject to deletion.

Moderation != Censorship.

Censorship

  • the institution, system, or practice of censoring
    "They oppose government censorship."
  • the actions or practices of censors

(source)


Censoring / censor

  • person who supervises conduct and morals: such as:
    • an official who examines materials (such as publications or films) for objectionable matter "Government censors deleted all references to the protest."
    • an official (as in time of war) who reads communications (such as letters) and deletes material considered sensitive or harmful
  • a hypothetical psychic agency that represses unacceptable notions before they reach consciousness

(source)

None of these definitions apply to comments on an online community being cleaned up every now and then, be it for off-topic chatter, or comments that are in violation of SE's rules.

Since this basically breaks the premise of your question, I don't see what else I can add here.

4
  • 3
    This answer isn't really helpful. It just states the current policy, without giving any reason why anybody should agree with it. A complete answer to this feature request would need to explain possible reasons why trusted users should remain prohibited from reading and possibly undeleting deleted comments, as they can currently do with deleted questions and answers. Jeff deciding something arbitrarily 13 years ago is not a good reason for 2021.
    – user000001
    Aug 25 at 14:33
  • OP is working on a new one, I believe.
    – Cerbrus
    Aug 25 at 14:35
  • 5
    @Cerbrus, I'm not. I decided to just place a "tl;dr" on top of this one. I'm quite far from wanting to start a crusade for some feature which might improve SO and might not. I ran across a situation which made me think moderating comments without any transparency has some negative aspects. I expressed that point as eloquently as I could. I feel at peace with my effort for improving StackOverflow and I'm absolutely not going to consume myself over it.
    – tao
    Aug 25 at 14:40
  • 3
    Yea, I'm sorry, but that's not a feature request. It doesn't address any of the concerns that have been raised in chat.
    – Cerbrus
    Aug 25 at 14:42
-22

I agree with this proposal.

Comments should be handled similar to questions and answers with respect of soft-deletion.

The best place to have them available would probably be in the question timeline. If a comment gets deleted, it should remain visible, in the timeline, with a pink background to differentiate the visible from the deleted ones. A visual indicator should be present under the post so that readers know to click the timeline. Voting and (positive) flagging should also be allowed in the timeline, to facilitate automatic undeletion of the comment if the readers see it fit. The comment score would also need to remain visible.

Especially when a question gets featured in the "hot network posts" list, or when it is linked from meta, it gets so many views that it is inevitable for the comments to attract at least a few flags. And the moderators, instead of banning the users for their needless flags, they just delete everything (path of least resistance), regardless of the usefulness of the comments, with the "second class citizen" excuse.

I propose from now on to consider all comments as "first class citizens".

4
  • With the exception of auto-deleted and self-deleted comments all the other deleted comments are deleted by mods, and delete-votes cast by mods are binding for posts. You propose this should be different for comments?
    – yivi
    Aug 25 at 15:49
  • @yivi: Yes, if it's useful, people should be able to vote to undelete it. I thought it worked the same way for posts too, that's new to me. (BTW thanks for the helpful edit)
    – user000001
    Aug 25 at 15:51
  • 2
    Unless it has changed, users cannot vote to undelete posts deleted by mods. Curiously, they can vote to delete posts undeleted by mods.
    – yivi
    Aug 25 at 15:55
  • 5
    If the comment was useful then it should be turned into an answer or an edit to an existing post. There's no reason for any of us to ever see deleted comments.
    – Dharman
    Aug 25 at 16:33

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