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Stack Overflow gets copy-pastes like this:
homework dump

Many of these questions are copy pasted from Google Classroom or some similar source. For example, the question below says

A university is receiving applications from students to register for language courses offered in six different languages. Each language has limited seats and time of submission of request is to be used for making a decision. The following are the fields provided in the application: Register Number, Name, Time and date of submission, Preference of language {Option1, Option2, Option3} Devise a solution that would automate the process of allocating the languages based on the order of preference given by students. Use appropriate data structures to process the data. Include provision for swapping of the language that has been allocated for a student on mutual consent.

That's zero research effort. Probably copied from somewhere. [1]

To have quality questions, can we block questions that are mostly pasted?

[1]: Smells like homework

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  • 5
    You can the client to detect the percentage of text that was pasted in? Do you type your Answers directly in the Answer box?
    – Scratte
    Aug 17 at 1:01
  • @Scratte Yes, I do. (Sometimes pasting in code from Notepad++, but not a lot.) Aug 17 at 1:02
  • 8
    Well, I type questions and answers in a .md file (using pycharm) and then copy and paste them over. And pray, do you type code directly into the question box? Don't you want to test it in an IDE?
    – 10 Rep
    Aug 17 at 1:05
  • 11
    Well.. no thank you. I don't want to be forced to have to type directly into the Answer box,.. I like to test my stuff, and I also write the text in a notepad before I copy'n'paste it into the box. After a while one even gets pretty good at adding all the right markdown, so at the end less than 1% isn't copy'n'pasted.
    – Scratte
    Aug 17 at 1:05
  • Updated it... only if the pasted part has no code. Aug 17 at 1:28
  • 9
    If you do your own research and find the source of the question online, feel free to flag the post as plagiarism. Aug 17 at 1:33
  • 4
    That OP didn't actually ask a question. They just dumped the requirements of their homework assignment without explaining what help they need. Close vote it as lacking details or perhaps needs focus / needs debugging details. I sometimes comment "You forgot to ask an actual question".
    – PM 2Ring
    Aug 17 at 2:20
  • 9
    There's no reliable way to auto-detect the difference between a copy & paste of text from some source which isn't their own original composition and something which they composed in another editor as entirely original content created just for posting their question on Stack Overflow/Stack Exchange. OTOH, a less objectionable alternative than preventing posting would be a popup which asks/reminds users about content needing to be original and/or our referencing requirements. [A plagiarism check could detect some types of copying from some sources, but it's expensive, and a different feature.]
    – Makyen Mod
    Aug 17 at 2:47
  • 7
    Essentially you want to block the actions of a subset of the user base, the size of which you can't prove, and in doing so you effectively want to make life more miserable for everyone including the subset that is innocent of any digital crime. That is a very good way of designing a feature request which will be received exceptionally poorly. This is also a typical example of don't ask if it CAN be done, ask if it SHOULD be done. I don't see any proof here that you considered the consequences of this.
    – Gimby
    Aug 17 at 8:22
  • 3
    I'm relieved to discover that I'm not the only one who "drafts" my questions and answers in my preferred editor and then copies them over to Stack Overflow. I thought about noting that when I first saw this feature suggestion pop up, but then thought, "Nah, I'm probably just a weirdo." Aug 19 at 0:07
  • 2
    @JeremyCaney did you forget where you are? We are all weirdos here :) Aug 19 at 0:20
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I don't think this is a good idea, for a few reasons.

First of all, it's not uncommon to compose questions in a text editor, or at least to keep a copy in case it gets lost. If I wrote a great mostly-text question, lost it due to a browser restart or something (draft saving isn't perfect), and then pasted it back in, should I now not be allowed to post it unless I painstakingly retype the whole thing?

Second, users who are determined to break the rules to post low-quality questions will do it anyway. I can't tell you how many times I've seen people post complete nonsense (keysmashes, holding down one character, the error message telling them to post more explanation, the script to Bee Movie...) because they were told that their question was mostly code and needed more explanation. I also can't tell you how many times I've seen people post screenshots of code, explaining that the system wouldn't allow them to post it as text. I fully expect this will result in even worse questions, featuring a screenshot of the thing they wanted to copy-paste, and a short "please help me I don't know how to get started" blurb.

We can already handle these effectively with close votes. They're far from the worst problem with content quality. Between the downsides and the effort it would take to do this, dev effort trying to improve content quality would be better spent elsewhere.

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  • 9
    I think you're right. The "system will not let me copy'n'paste it, so I took a screen shot of the raw markdown in my notepad" could become a new thing.
    – Scratte
    Aug 17 at 1:38
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I am not a fan of the idea either.

Apart from preventing well-intentioned users who prefer to type their posts anywhere but in the text editor Stack Exchange provides (not to mention that when the new rich text editor goes live, the number of such people is bound to drastically increase), it is also highly unlikely to stop those who want to get some free help with whatever they are facing: the system does not allow me to paste 100% of the post? Let me try 2 times 50%. Still can't? Let's do 25% but in 4 Ctrl + V hits... You get the idea.

As a potential repurpose of this idea, there could be an automated check that makes a Google Search API (or similar) request to check if the post content has a full match, but them being pricy on a scale of the Stack Exchange network, having impractical usage limits on free tiers, and due to a high potential for false positives, this would just cause more problems than it solves.

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