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I had a serious issue in C# and wrote a question in a poor way. There's no doubt about this.

So I tried to edit my question to make it better, but I'm getting downvoted, the question got closed, and I don't know why specifically.

The question is: Derived class thinks my base class got deleted

I believe my question is finally matching the community's standards. Could you explain what is wrong in my question? It would be of great help to me for further questions I could ask.

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    Your question certainly got meta's attention.
    – yivi
    Jun 28 at 16:56
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    Thanks for asking for help on improving your question. The real question here is, Why was the original question deleted several minutes after this Meta question was posted? Any of the delete voters care to comment on that seemingly-obvious abuse of their privileges?
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 28 at 17:11
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    @CodyGray Just as a clarification; any potential abuse of the delete vote privilege in this case would only apply to users who voted to delete after the question was brought up on Meta, correct? Presumably, voting to delete it before that point is not an abuse, so your comment might confuse users who had cast a delete vote already.
    – cigien
    Jun 28 at 17:31
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    Not entirely sure about that, @cigien. That would be one obvious indication of an abuse of the privilege, to be sure. Another would be casting a delete vote when the post had clearly been substantially edited since its closure, and you are not a topic expert who is able to defend the continued closure of that question for the original reason. There is a reason that closed posts aren't immediately deleted.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 28 at 17:35
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    @CodyGray Ah, I thought you were referring just to the first case. I think I do agree in this case that the question didn't deserve deletion, but abuse might be a strong way to describe casting an incorrect delete vote. Anyway, thanks for clarifying what you meant.
    – cigien
    Jun 28 at 17:39
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    @CodyGray for transparency: a del-pls passed through SOCVR: chat.stackoverflow.com/transcript/message/52514092#52514092
    – rene
    Jun 28 at 17:47
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    @CodyGray it was an erroneous vote, for my part (before this Meta Q was posted/seen); I was looking for an error message instead of seeing that Setting Error was the literal error output OP referenced (I was thinking "this guy has edited half a dozen times and still hasn't put the error message in the question?"). Once I re-read the question & read the revisions, I actually bookmarked the question to undelete vote later, upvoted the Q, and made an edit to the answer to improve (IMO) the readability of it. Not the first time I have wished we had the ability to retract delete/undelete votes.
    – TylerH
    Jun 28 at 17:58
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    @rene Not at all enthusiastic about that, although I didn't mention it explicitly. As you well know, "del-pls" should be reserved for exceptional cases, not applied indiscriminately to any closed question. And it especially should not be applied when the user has already made a substantial edit to the question and is clearly seeking to have it reopened. If nothing else, that demonstrates continued engagement and interest on the part of the asker, which is reason enough for the question to remain visible. I do expect room owners to play a part in enforcing these minimum expectations.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 28 at 18:00
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    Thanks, @TylerH. Errors are understandable, and made by all of us from time to time. I appreciate your admitting that, and your willingness to follow-up on the question.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 28 at 18:01
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    @CodyGray apologies for any inconvenience; my rationale was similar to TylerH's (minus the follow-up part, to be honest), and in any case the discussion here was unknown to me at the time of voting. I take it as a lesson-learned that I should be more careful in the future.
    – desertnaut
    Jun 29 at 6:59
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    Sure; you're welcome. Note that asking about how to avoid downvotes is a bit of a trigger phrase on Meta; it tends to attract more downvotes, at least to the Meta question where you are talking about downvotes. Always prefer to ask how to improve the question, rather than focusing on the downvotes themselves.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 29 at 8:49
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    How did no one suggest / flag it as duplicate question?
    – user692942
    Jun 30 at 0:02
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    @TylerH I wasn't (and don't use winforms), but a two minute search for site@stackoverflow.com c# form designer base events got me pretty close.
    – user692942
    Jun 30 at 13:38
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    @RobertHarvey That claim is patently absurd, and it's difficult to even dignify that with a response. The system was never designed to block everything that is considered abusive or inappropriate behavior. A trivial example of abusive behavior that the system does not prevent is using one's delete votes to delete any and all questions with the [c#] tag because you hate C#.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 30 at 16:23
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You've run into one of the unfortunate problems with how Stack Overflow works, which is that once a question is deemed "bad', it's fairly hard to recover through natural means.

Once you have some downvotes, people tend to go into your question thinking "this is bad" without having read it. Not to say they won't change their mind, but you're starting at a lower base level than if you'd had a good question to start with. And even if they don't, problem is many people just don't open net-negative score questions - so you have fewer people who might open it and upvote it to replace the downvotes.

You also probably are in the close vote queue. That means people will be reviewing your question to see if it should be closed, and while our reviewers are pretty fair on balance, you're again at a base of somewhat below par.

So, what do you do to avoid this happening again?

  • First, spend more time on your questions before posting. Just like the Fastest Gun In The West is bad for answers, it's also bad for questions! A question that is well thought out ahead of time will not be downvoted or closed.
  • If you do turn around a "bad" question, consider reaching out via chat to the language chat room if there is one. There's usually someone(s) there that would not mind looking at your question and helping you improve it further - and maybe that person/those people would also upvote you, bringing you back up the list of questions likely to be opened.
  • Comment reply to the different people who commented to tell you your question wasn't very good, asking them if the new question fits their needs. Don't do this willy-nilly, but only if you did specifically improve the area they objected to, and don't do it more than once.
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    Comment-replies are probably the least effective thing you can do. You're not likely going to get a response, let alone a response that will actually impart any guidance on how to better ask questions.
    – Makoto
    Jun 28 at 17:12
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    @Makoto I don't mean a response to help you improve, I mean letting the person know you improved the question in response to their issues, hoping to get a reversal of the downvote. I at least will go back when I get a (polite) response saying they've improved the issue, and reverse my vote, as long as it's not so frequent to be annoying. And yes, I don't know if it's going to materially help all the time - but it's probably better than not doing it, if you really have improved.
    – Joe
    Jun 28 at 17:14
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    I've never seen that work in practice in all my years of being here. If anything I feel like that encourages more downvotes.
    – Makoto
    Jun 28 at 17:14
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    I mean, if the person already downvoted you... can't really do it again :) (shrug) It definitely works with me, but I couldn't say beyond that. Of course, most of the time it doesn't work, because the person doesn't actually improve the question, but... we're talking about an actually improved question here, I think.
    – Joe
    Jun 28 at 17:15
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    In this case the OP did everything right: stackoverflow.com/posts/67835567/timeline. After their post was closed they made a significant clarifying edit that put the post into the re-open review queue again. The delete votes are unfortunate and kind of abuse in this case.
    – rene
    Jun 28 at 17:28
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    @rene So users deleted a post that was edited and in the reopen queue fit to be reopened?
    – Scratte
    Jun 28 at 17:31
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    @Scratte the reasoning of our users is sometimes blurry as hell. Even gets me confused.
    – rene
    Jun 28 at 17:34
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    @rene I guess I should tell you where I found a del-pls requests made much later than the edit then..
    – Scratte
    Jun 28 at 17:34
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    @Scratte don't tell me it is in some bloody chatroom?
    – rene
    Jun 28 at 17:35
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    Re "...below par": The first association may be golf (where under par is better, not worse (even if "under" and "over" is used with "par")). Perhaps rephrase? Jun 30 at 15:05
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    @PeterMortensen I think "below par" or even "under par" in a non-golf context is well understood to mean "worse than usual" - certainly all of the top google hits agree.
    – Joe
    Jun 30 at 15:29
  • @Joe While I agree that your use of "below par" is technically correct, I believe a good compromise on the usage of 'par' here would be "subpar" - I, like Peter, believe its usage is confusing due to the contradictory meaning in golf vs non-golf contexts, and 'subpar' doesn't have that weakness. Jul 1 at 14:03
  • @FireSBurnsmuP Understood, but with the context I think it's clear, and you can't just substitute "subpar" in that sentence.
    – Joe
    Jul 1 at 14:15
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As others have already explained, your question is already an "OK" question. Thus, I will focus on how to make it a great question.

Include a minimal reproducible example.

Your example is not minimal. At a first glance, at least one of the catch lines can be removed, and the error will still occur. The same is probably true for a lot of the other lines of Port_Setting(). Once you start down that road, you will probably identify which particular exception is thrown, and that all that "convert an exception to an error code" logic is not necessary to reproduce the problem.

Once your example is minimal (nothing can be removed or simplified without the problem disappearing), your question will be both more interesting and easier to read, and, thus, more favorably received by the community: You will have already identified where exactly the error occurs, so the SO crowd can use their expertise to explain why it occurs and what you can do to fix it (which is something many people here like to do), rather than having to debug your code (which is something many people here don't like to do).

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    Part of it wasn't my code, and not being very used to the throw catch mechanic, I did not touch it. But it was silly of me to not try to remove some of it. thanks for the tips =)
    – Prim
    Jun 29 at 8:22
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Not a professional in the technology stack, but I'm also not seeing anything that would immediately warrant its deletion or closure at this point. In the beginning it was likely the case that your situation wasn't as self-contained as it should've been, or that the issue you were trying to demonstrate was too complex for others to simply reproduce on the fly to help you out; your future edits helped out with that.

Asking questions here can be iterative; know that it's challenging to always try and pinpoint exactly why others felt like it wasn't up to standards. I don't see any reason why it isn't now, so I would take this as a learning opportunity and try to reflect on the overall chain of events rather than the side effects or fallout.

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