145

SO have assigned privileges to users based on their reputation. A higher rep allows you to do more. From very basic privileges like voting to single-handed dupe-close.

The new Collectives project changes this. Now zero-rep users can get access to a feature that even high rep user can't get, i.e. "Recommended answer". Further, zero-rep users can be assigned a special role as "Recognized user" - again something high rep users can't get solely by their reputation.

Personally I feel very bad about this. The "earn your privileges" model seems great to me. Earning high rep requires a lot of effort and time. During that period you learn "How-to SO". Therefore it's pretty safe to give "powers" to high rep users.

But giving privileges to users (that may be) without any SO experience makes me worried.

I'm also concerned about the effect of "Recommended answer" and "Recognized user". I fear it will give a voting-bias by attracting readers to those/their answers and consequently impact the voting system as we know it.

The above represents my current view (i.e. I don't like it). I'd like to start a meta-SO-discussion about this to learn how other SO users feel about "Recommend answer" and "Recognized user" introduced as part of Collectives. Is that what we want?

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  • 58
    Now, to be completely honest, I'm not a fan of the rep-based privileges. I find the correlation between reputation (mostly from posting) and moderating the site (mostly from not posting) very weak. Still, I recognise it's the best we currently have. I'm OK with some people being given privileges despite their rep (e.g., SE staff), however I'd expect them to use such privileges appropriately. The Collectives don't inspire confidence right now as I don't know who would get privileges and what training they got with those. Nor what oversighe.
    – VLAZ
    Jun 25 at 10:46
  • 53
    I currently expect the recommended answer mark to be more useful than the accept mark. At least, they can potentially be used by someone who has a clue on what is best. The accept mark on the other hand is given out by the asker who is probably the least qualified person to judge. Besides the recommend answer I see no "privilege" given out to collectives. I'm also not that happy with these changes, but talking about "good by reputation based privileges" is overly dramatic.
    – BDL
    Jun 25 at 11:10
  • 9
    For now the Collectives privileges only apply to Collectives-specific features - recognize users, recommend answers, allowed to write articles. Collectives admins do not have access to any of the reputation based privileges (voting, closing, deleting, editing, and so on) unless they have earned enough reputation for those privileges. I don't see much of a problem with that specific aspect of Collectives if it stays that way. I'd totally join you in raising pitchforks if Collectives admins or recognized users could ignore rep requirements for generic SO privileges.
    – l4mpi
    Jun 25 at 12:42
  • 1
    And re the "recognized user" / "recommended answer" part - I'm already used to ignoring the "new user" label and the accepted answer flag, more bullshit labels are not exactly welcome but also not the end of the world. You would probably not lose anything of value if you hide the Collectives labels with a browser addon. I've not even bothered to do that because I'm not active in any go or google-cloud related tags.
    – l4mpi
    Jun 25 at 12:45
  • 17
    The title does not really accurately reflect the new situation or even how you describe the current situation. No reputation level allows users to post "recommended" answers or be "recognized users" in terms of answering. Reputation-based privileges are not going anywhere.
    – TylerH
    Jun 25 at 13:09
  • 5
    I don't think the new "recommended answer" or "recognized users" are going to have much of an impact on most contributors - i.e. folks asking or answering. For readers it helps them differentiate quality content from the rest. I see that as a win.
    – Nisarg
    Jun 25 at 13:11
  • 7
    "I'm also concerned about the effect of "Recommended answer" and "Recognized user". I fear it will give a voting-bias by attracting readers to those/their answers and consequently impact the voting system as we know it." I'm sure you mean well, but this is not exactly a nice thing to say about your peers as it shows a complete lack of faith. People who vote honestly will not suddenly change their ways just because another signal is flung at them. In fact that recommended answer status will work like the meta effect I think, it will put the content up to higher scrutiny.
    – Gimby
    Jun 25 at 13:43
  • 2
    I am also personally negative about that feature, but what have collectives to do with priviledges? Nothing. It's opposite and rather funny, that admin of collective will have zero priviledges.
    – Sinatr
    Jun 25 at 14:04
  • 33
    Down-voted for misleading fear-mongering title. I hadn't heard of Collectives, and thought it was going to be replacing all rep-based privileges like voting, closing, commenting, using chat, etc, based on your title which I saw in the "hot meta questions" sidebar. (Especially after skimming down to the first few comments to see what other people were saying about it). Fortunately @TylerH pointed out that it's only a few new things, not a change to any existing privileges. Jun 25 at 14:05
  • 2
    "zero-rep users" are "Guest Users" who are not even logged in... Logged in Users will have (at least) 1-Rep...
    – chivracq
    Jun 26 at 11:02
  • 2
    I wonder how to call users that aren't recognized users. Unrecognized users maybe?
    – Trilarion
    Jun 26 at 11:07
  • 3
    I'm not that concerned about "Recommended answers", but I'm not really sure what concrete problem it's meant to solve (except "make partners happy", and that, or releasing a feature without much motivation, would be quite a bit more concerning). Jun 26 at 15:27
  • 2
    @BernhardBarker imagine that the C language is a product, then an answer recommendation from Dennis Ritchie would have been very valuable to have. It doesn't solve any problem, it adds a new signal which in my opinion has far more value to it than the answer acceptance flag.
    – Gimby
    Jun 28 at 8:17
  • Not all reputations are created equal; in other words, reputation can be either general SO reputation (moderation, ettiquette, etc.) or subject specific (tags). The latter would also apply to membership of collectives even if that's not necessarily reflected by any (tag) badges (yet). To require the former, there could be minimum requirements like having "Informed" badge (and maybe some other bronze badges if necessary)
    – shaedrich
    Jun 28 at 9:31
  • 1
    @Gimby Even if it could be useful in theory, if it's not solving an actual problem, it may well just be noise. A solution in search of a problem is rarely good. This may highlight answers from the Dennis Ritchie's of the world, but more often it would be from their random coworkers or someone who those coworkers think is knowledgeable, at which point we'd just be appealing to an authority who may not actually know what they're talking about. It may be more useful than answer acceptance, but that's not really saying much... Jun 28 at 10:29
48

Therefore it's pretty safe to give "powers" to high rep users.

Adding a badge to a user or an answer doesn't seem very powerful compared to reputation-based powers: Arbitrary editing, closing questions, seeing deleted posts, deleting posts, undeleting posts, etc.

I'm also concerned about the effect of "Recommended answer" and "Recognized user". I fear it will give a voting bias by attracting readers to those/their answers and consequently impact the voting system as we know it.

I don't see a problem with that. People will still upvote answers that help and downvote if they don't. If some answers get special attention because the organization behind the technology embraces that answer – and the answer works — why shouldn't the answerer get reputation?

Also, consider that these powers will be handed to organizations that power relevant technologies. Hopefully, these organizations are qualified to determine whether a user is highly skilled in their technology. Since "recognized user" gives no other extra powers except "recommending answers" I don't see much of a problem with that.

I do get the sentiment here and in the announcement post that all of this undermines the democratic foundation of Stack Overflow. Autocratically awarding power might set a bad precedent.

I think the abilities above are a red-line. Any stronger powers single-handedly awarded by Stack Exchange Inc. would worry me too. This iteration of collectives, however, doesn't.

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    "People will still upvote answers that help and downvote if they don't." still? most people don't already.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 25 at 14:57
  • 2
    @KevinB My point is that I don't think the badge will affect the people who do up or down vote questions already.
    – idmean
    Jun 25 at 15:06
  • 6
    i'm about 90% on it will. The majority of votes that occur are upvotes, and things that are "recommended" will generally receive them. Not only because it has the badge, but also because it's probably the best answer.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 25 at 15:07
  • 11
    eh, stack trusting them is meaningless to me, honestly. They have a monetary reason to "trust" them.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 25 at 15:11
  • 5
    @KevinB Yeah, I see where you are coming from. It really depends on which technologies SE plans to allow as a collective. If it's things like React, Rails, or SwiftUI where there's a reputable organization that can logically act as "owner", things will probably be fine. But if SE decides to sell collectives to random organizations that don't really "own" these technologies (think JavaScript collective owned by Facebook, for example) things will get bad.
    – idmean
    Jun 25 at 15:24
  • 2
    Most votes are cast by people who have no clue what they're doing. Hence travesties of answers like this one. A badge will most certainly influence people who don't understand the implications of what they're being told to do.
    – jpmc26
    Jun 28 at 5:10
  • 3
    @KevinB Ever been to, say, Microsoft's support forums? Even got the canned "run sfc /scannow" answer from an employee or MVP? Employees' answers aren't always the best answers, and I wonder what SO will do if an org delegates employees that are actively terrible by SO standards. Will their answers actually get removed/their accounts banned? Jun 28 at 10:01
  • 2
    @idmean "Then the "recommended" answer is probably the best answer and deserves upvotes. Doesn't it?" It doesn't, I'd say. If the recommended answer were really (always) the best answer, we wouldn't need votes at all. As soon as an answer is recommended, it should then be sorted on top and voting on this answer could continue or stop, doesn't matter. But this is not the case. I'd rather see recommendations as just another kind of vote.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 28 at 10:36
  • @Trilarion I removed my comment because it undermines my main point. Additional attention drawn to an answer by a "recommended answer" badge is not necessarily bad. In case a "recommended" answer doesn't work, I expect people to act as with any other answer: downvote. Also, I do not expect responsible Collectives to commonly or intentionally mark objectionable answers as "recommended".
    – idmean
    Jun 28 at 12:35
24

The "earn your privileges" model seems great to me. Earning high rep requires a lot of effort and time. During that period you learn "How-to SO".

The other side of the story is that if the Collective admins earn privileges just like all other users, the community will still have to moderate their content in the meantime. As Makoto said here, there's the potential for some tension here.

If very low rep Collective admins are given moderation powers, they may not be accustomed to SO practices. However the SO staff has mentioned that there is a training program for that, so we'll see.

I'm also concerned about the effect of "Recommended answer" and "Recognized user". I fear it will give a voting-bias by attracting readers to those/their answers and consequently impact the voting system as we know it.

I share your concern that the new features as "Recommended Answers" and "Recognized User" have the potential to sway voting patterns in a way that subtracts from the collective effort and democracy of the current system. This is basically what I expressed here.

Though the current voting system is not going to change overnight. Useful content will still be useful. However, official company stamps will grant more weight and credibility to selected content by simply being there. Today when two answers appear on the same question, they have to be vetted based on their merits alone. The company stamp will interfere with this process and may end up diminishing the merits of unsanctioned answers. The process becomes less transparent, and, ultimately, less free.

It's a looming presence on the community.

However...

When administered with great care and with respect, the Collective stamp may produce some benefits for everyone. I want to point out these two circumstances:

Highlight the best1 answer in highly viewed questions

The more views a question has, the more common is the issue it addresses. At a certain point when you have a bunch of answers all with score in the hundreds, as a newbie to the technology, you may be hard-pressed to pick one over the others. The company stamp may actually help speed up the search for approved solutions, and keep up with the evolution of the technology. It might even turn out as a solution to outdated answers. For example, in this answer (How to efficiently concatenate strings in go), the Collective mark is kinda low-key and does the job of pointing you to the solution right away. I'm going to hypothesize that the actual benefit of this Collective mark is directly proportional to the number of views.

Where this can fail

  1. This still has a negative impact on essentially all answers that appear below the marked one. If you are in a hurry, you'll probably stop there and don't even look at other answers. Is there a gem down there? Who knows.
  2. On low view questions or new questions with only low score answers, the Collective mark will give much more weight to the marked answer and sway voting or outright invalidate non-marked answers.

So in the end it'll depend on where and how the Collective mark is used.

1: definitions of "best" may vary

Give credibility to experts that happen to not use Stack Overflow

The "Recognized User" mark has the benefit of giving instant credibility to users who are renown experts in the technology but just happen to seldom use Stack Overflow.

For example, Bryan Mills is one of the maintainers of the Go language and until a couple days ago his SO profile didn't mention that. Of course people who are familiar with the Go project know who Bryan is, but all others probably don't. So when Bryan answers a question with his 900 rep, the "Recognized User" mark will make it clear that he does know what he's talking about, even if you don't know him.

Where this can fail

  1. answers may get upvotes "out of trust" without being actually read and vetted

In this particular case of Bryan Mills, I don't think this will ever be a big problem, but again, it does place influence in the hands of few. Is this going to not be a problem with any Collective we may have in the future? Heh...


So overall I can see some actual benefits in Collectives, at the expense of established Stack Overflow practices. It is clearly a trade off. Maybe the Go Collective enjoys admins and Recognized Users who will operate with respect of the community and in its best interest. Maybe they will use these features to actually reduce noise and improve the Q&A process, without getting in the way of how the site typically works.

Maybe future Collectives will have less respectful admins and members, and there will be situations of abuse.

Whether it will all be worth it, whether this paid company stamps and sponsored content will end up improving things or yield to corporate opaqueness, only time will tell.

I, for one, don't like the trade off, but I’m interested to see how it pans out.

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  • 5
    You mean we're allowed to mention the possible benefits of Collectives on meta too, instead of just doomsaying?? Man, the more you know...
    – zcoop98
    Jun 25 at 22:38
  • 4
    Jokes aside, I think what you've laid out here is a really solid analysis of the possible benefits. I really hope it all comes to pass this way, it'd be really cool to see this all work out for the better of SO. Having more experts on Stack Overflow recognized within their respective domain(s), on the surface, just can't be a bad thing. We'll see how abuse vectors play out over time, and whether it impacts voting, but I'm personally pretty optimistic for now.
    – zcoop98
    Jun 25 at 22:39
  • 2
    "potential to sway voting patterns" - well, so do accepted answers and ftgiw. There are a few cases where low-quality content has a high number of upvotes, and it sustains its top position because nobody scrolls down to the better content to upvote it. Recognised answers have the potential to change this for good, if used responsibly. I'm still optimistic :-)
    – Bergi
    Jun 26 at 23:58
  • 5
    "answers may get upvotes "out of trust"" - the same already happens with high-reputation users. I don't think it's a large problem.
    – Bergi
    Jun 27 at 0:01
13

The title of this question exaggerates a bit and it's only a very limited departure from merit based privileges so far, but I share your concerns. It feels like the proverbial slippery slope and while today there is only speculation that recommendations might change the sorting order, tomorrow might be the day it actually happens.

What did really happen?

No illusions: Google bought itself direct influence on the way information stored on Stack Overflow is shown. They bought a privilege, nothing more and nothing less.

Will they abuse it? Maybe they will recommend answers using paid services more often, or recommend answers from their own employees more often or just recommend the wrong answers or do not update their recommendations?

Or maybe their recommendations will even be helpful, who knows. The thing is though ..

..that single recommendations are not worth much in general because the accuracy of a single recommendation is not very high. Only if one averages (or sums up) independent recommendations, one gains statistical power. You don't believe me? Then read ..

This answer is hereby recommended! It's the best answer to this question.

After reading the last sentence, did your opinion of the answer change?

And I'm a doctor so what I say is true.

And I'm a Google employee, so there can't be a slice of doubt about it anymore.

Did this recommendation change anything?

At the end of the day, nobody should put a lot of trust in only a single recommendation, they are easily wrong. Every vote is a recommendation and the aggregate of all votes together is still the best we have to judge the quality of an answer. Let's stick to it and weigh recommendations very low or not at all.

Unfortunately, it doesn't help with that we are now on a slippery slope. I'm more pessimistic than optimistic. Quality might drop as a result. I'll try to ignore recommendations as much as possible.

On the other hand, the feature is so young, it's hardly possible to judge it fairly. One should see it in action a bit more to really be able to really judge it. Maybe recommendations will correlate perfectly with the highest score, in that case it'll be just redundancy.

3
  • 1
    Everyone knows that you're just a dog on the internet, not a Google doctor :P
    – Bergi
    Jun 27 at 0:03
  • 2
    @Bergi Of course not. I'm a recognized top, best of the very best expert and want my full expert title displayed below my name on every contribution from me. That's only for the better of the site, so that people can better judge my contributions, otherwise I would be rather modest. :D
    – Trilarion
    Jun 27 at 7:10
  • @Trilarion Lmao ignore him. In reality, he's the internet dog. Jun 27 at 14:02
5

I would like to see such users required to earn some (low) amount of rep (let's say 101 on the site itself, not counting the association bonus) first, just to demonstrate that they basically understand Stack Overflow.

The point seems to be to recognise people who have a close association with a certain technology as an expert, and to give such experts some small special powers. That seems reasonable, and is mostly unrelated to moderation powers, so I don't think that tying it to high rep is necessary. But having a small rep requirement, just to prove that they basically understand how things work here, seems like a good idea.

That said, I'm not sure anyone knows how things work here any more. The community is now used to having the rug pulled out from under us as policy changes radically and with no warning. So rep means little any more anyway.

6
  • 2
    As the companies are paying, how about such users be required to take a course in how-to-SO? Not just The Tour, but modules based on the Help pages for Asking, Our model, Reputation & Moderation, Answering, Badges (and Privileges), and Review Queues? Jun 25 at 15:21
  • 2
    Honestly, I feel like just reading through the Tour and help pages and perhaps some history might be more useful to getting a tiny amount of rep. At over 25k, I am still getting lots of things wrong. 100 rep, well, ... Jun 25 at 15:45
  • 3
    @AndrewMorton Worth mentioning that this importance wasn't lost on SE, it's directly mentioned in the research post (third paragraph of Moderation section): "However, the one thing we were encouraged to do was to provide our customers with guidelines and help docs to ensure their expectations about community norms and rules are set. We’ve done many demos and sessions with our launch customers, and have written several new help docs, and will continue adding to this as the product evolves."
    – zcoop98
    Jun 25 at 17:24
  • 1
    @zcoop98 That information is also available to all new SO users. And yet... :| Perhaps I should have also suggested both theory and practical exams, the latter including performing some acceptable reviews. The chances are that the such users are entirely competent, reasonable, familiar with code reviews, and will write answers which are good, but unless they are schooled in how to behave, they, and we, will have to go through a teething stage. Jun 25 at 17:47
  • 1
    @AndrewMorton I mean, yeah, it's available, but I would deeply hope that "demos and sessions" would be drastically more impactful. I would also argue there's a difference to be noted between a random internet user making a (free) SO account and ignoring guidelines, and a corporate entity paying for a collective and totally disregarding both the marketing and the onboarding of Collectives as a paid-product. It doesn't sound like making a collective is or will be a flippant endeavor.
    – zcoop98
    Jun 25 at 18:24
  • 2
    @zcoop98 There's a long-running disconnect between what new users need to know and what new users are allowed to know without doing a lot of research. Some of those things are simple, such as letting them know "tend your question for a couple of hours after asking it." Jun 25 at 18:41
3

Everyone is worried about "democracy" being violated by this feature. Either explicitly (giving users without enough reputation some kind of arbitrary power) or implicitly (giving an answer more visibility than others) but are we forgetting the reason behind the existence of Stack Overflow? How bad is this feature against the ultimate goal to make SO the best knowledge repository on IT questions?

I think it is a good move even in pursuit of this so-called "democracy". Indeed I think that a recommended answer will be scrutinized more than other answers from people that know the matter. Not only by the powers behind the Collective. If anything comes out as wrong in that answer then it will attract a lot of founded criticism. Any company that cares about its business will fix the answer as fast as they can or change it to address the concerns raised. This will make that the "best answer" not only because is a recommended answer but because it is really the one. In the end, it is precisely the concept of democracy that emerges strengthened. It will be like a "Community answer" but with someone behind that has a strong incentive to maintain and keep it updated.

7
  • Reading the arguments here I wonder if collectives is really needed for enhanced scrutiny. All that, collaboration, maintenance and focus on a few good answers could also be achieved by making SO a bit more like Wikipedia. The community could simply recommend an answer (and we do, every vote is a recommendation). We could concentrate on making the top scored answer always the best. That would though result in reputation handed only to a single user while the work would be a collaboration of many. And that would also be a problem here.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 28 at 8:18
  • 2
    Any company that care its business will fix the answer as fast as they can Have you spent much time on MSDN lately. It's all out of date and poorly maintained. I raise issues with their documentation continually on GitHub and the turn around isn't great
    – Liam
    Jun 28 at 8:25
  • 2
    "How bad is this feature against the ultimate goal to make SO the best knowledge repository on IT questions?" If that was ever the goal, they abandoned it long ago. The overall goal of the past 6-7 years has been to maximize traffic, quantity over quality. And the goal for the past 3-4 years seemed to be polishing up profitability so that they could sell the company, if that wasn't the goal all along. What goals the new owners have, we have yet to find out.
    – Lundin
    Jun 28 at 9:00
  • 1
    @Lundin It is difficult for me to answer your objections in a sensible way. I run my own little business and my ultimate goal is to have a better profitability from everything I do. From the morning till late in the night. So I sympathize with every folks that's trying to do the same. I immagine that keeping the SO site up to the level required by the magnitude of the visitors is not an easy and economic task. They need money for the hardware, for the net, for the folks that stays up to fix thing when they broke. At every hour of the day for the full week...
    – Steve
    Jun 29 at 14:47
  • 1
    So when I talk about ultimate goal is more a goal for us volounteers to try to keep the quality standards and I don't think that SE should be reprimanded for trying some way to make money, but I digress, the question remains the same. Is Collectives bad for quality or not?
    – Steve
    Jun 29 at 14:47
  • 1
    @Liam Of course, that could be taken as an example of a company that doesn't care for its business. But there is potential in this effort. Now we could only wait to see how the things evolve and how many companies or organizations will try this feature and organize their presence.
    – Steve
    Jun 29 at 14:53
  • 1
    @Steve You can't really compare a small company with a few employees if any with SO. But what's relevant here is to compare SO with an open source, non-profit alternative. Because those can actually top prioritize things like the community, building a knowledge base, maintain a high quality etc. SO can never make those things top priority.
    – Lundin
    Jun 30 at 8:26
2

It seems quite dramatic to say "goodbye reputation based privileges" when the announcement post goes to some length to make it clear that those privileges are not changing or going away.

Especially considering how frequently I've seen SO users complain about bad answers getting recognition through uninformed questioners accepting them, or the democratic voting system upvoting them, it's strange (though not unsurprising) to see immediate pushback on a system that gives a tiny bit of extra visibility to domain experts.

Obviously "earning privileges" is great in theory but like any community system, it isn't foolproof just because it's been around a long time. Right now, I can spend a few weeks making minor pedantic typographical edits to questions and earn enough rep for high level privileges. I can then use that rep I got without adding any value to the site to downvote, close, or otherwise disrupt questions about technologies I've never even touched.

If some new (or old!) tech has incorrect or outdated information here that frequently comes up in search results, but the experts aren't active SO users, why should they have to spend all that time building up rep just to correct one old post? Brand new users can't even leave a comment to point to new information!

Earning your rep is great for being part of a community, but since the SO community is doggedly focused on being solely a place to collect questions and answers without saying "thank you" or any other typical community interactions, then it makes perfect sense to provide an easier way for experts to pop in and improve those answers.

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    You'll likely get flack for criticizing SO curation strategy, but I think you're spot on about the impact here. Infusing more domain experts into their specific domain(s) on Stack Overflow will very likely a net gain, not a loss, for quality on the platform.
    – zcoop98
    Jun 25 at 17:17
  • 6
    @zcoop98 I did, my post was downvoted three seconds after posting it and my comment acknowledging it was deleted. The SO community loves to say the site admins don't listen to them when rolling out new features, but it's easy to see why when the community is hostile to even the mildest criticism - on a post asking for other user's views! Jun 25 at 20:14
  • 9
    We delete comments that complain about downvotes. They are useless. I wasn't the one who deleted yours here, but I delete them as soon as I spot them. Deleting irrelevant and whiny comments isn't "hostility".
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 26 at 9:32
  • 1
    Stop complaining about the community being too hostile. No one is hostile It's just that rules are strictly followed here. The only stuff that is needed to be said is said. Useless things such as "thank you" or "why did I got downvoted" are irrelevant. Jun 27 at 14:11
  • 3
    See the thing is, when I said "hostile" I simply meant "downvoting dissenting opinions without reading them", not "mean". The people who go out of their way to leave a comment calling me "whiny" for making an observation about the way the site works on a meta post about the way the site works make it clear that the word is more appropriate than I initially realized. Jun 27 at 15:20
  • 2
    I can spend a few weeks making minor pedantic typographical edits to questions and earn enough rep for high level privileges. IMHO, this is over-dramatizing (as well as the question). As soon as you have rep. > 2k, no edit will push it anymore. With 2k rep. you don't have "super" privileges. You're still bound to give e.g. close votes which have to be confirmed by other users. (And reaching 2k just be editing minor typos is still a high effort, isn't it?) ;-) Jun 27 at 15:29
  • The problem I see is that "domain experts" is the wrong designation. "People marked as domain experts by a paying entity" would be correct. If the people actually were domain experts, they would already be so. You don't become expert by Google paying SE money. Either someone is, or is not a domain expert.
    – nvoigt
    Jun 28 at 8:03
  • 2
    @nvoigt There are basically known domain experts (high rep) and unknown domain experts (not yet high rep). The idea for recommendations is probably to make more unknown experts known, but it could backfire and produce instead amateurs falsely known as known experts as well as making unknown experts not part of a collective even more unknown. Time will tell what happens. It surely is a departure from merit based judgement.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 28 at 10:42
  • 3
    "...an easier way for experts to pop in and improve those answers." I'm not convinced this is really a problem. The limitation for experts to take part in SO and improve existing content are very low. I never had the feeling that something is holding me back there. Maybe right at the beginning for the below 2k rep users, it's kind of more difficult. But then none of the recently introduced features really addresses that.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 28 at 10:44

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