59

As you may have seen, we launched a new initiative today: CollectivesTM on Stack Overflow. For over a year now, I’ve led our Product Research efforts on this project. In this post I want to share some of the valuable feedback we’ve collected from community members (mods and non-mods), how their input shaped what we’re launching today, and what we hope to launch in the near future.

Before I dive in, here are some key things you might be wondering about:

  • We’ve collected a lot of feedback from users and moderators. We’ve spent over a hundred hours in 1-on-1 interviews with users and potential customers who have generously given their time to research sessions. We’ve also collected thousands of survey responses, and spent a lot of time reading through feature requests and feedback about past projects on Meta.

  • While we wanted a representative set of feedback, we had a focus on engaging with active, highly contributing Stack Overflow members and moderators. In particular we had a panel of 12 users and moderators who met with us consistently for the last year, and whose feedback has been invaluable.

  • We’ve kept some things sacred: sort order, the way rep is awarded on Q&A, and what is considered on topic for Q&A, to name a few things. While some of the new functionality we’ve added has necessitated change, we’ve tried to do this in the least disruptive way possible.

  • This isn’t the end of us collecting feedback - as you probably saw, this is still a Beta release. We will continue iterating on these features based on new feedback and insights. I encourage you all to continue sharing feedback, and if you’re interested, to also opt-in to research participation in your email settings so my team and I can contact you for more detailed feedback.

Background and context

When the idea of companies having ‘public teams’ or ‘spaces’ was first brought up, my mind went to all the ways it could possibly go wrong (maybe this is going through some of your minds too - if so, read on). But I was also really curious about whether there was any genuine value that organisations could add for our users. So this sparked our first big research and design effort: a 5-day design sprint, attended by a wide range of teams from across the company; product management, community management, product design, engineering, data, product research, and more.

While Stack Overflow needs paid products in order to operate, we want to do this by adding value to the community, not changing things for the worse. So we settled on the following mission statement for our design sprint: “How might we enable companies to build relationships with the Stack Overflow community in a way that improves Stack Overflow as a resource for developers?”

During the design sprint, there were a few things we settled on early:

  • We should aim to not change the guidelines around what is on topic for Stack Overflow. This means we should be thinking about organisations who are technology providers, and who likely already have technologies with active tags on Stack Overflow.

  • In order for organisations to add value, they would need to directly participate in Q&A in some form - not as a channel for customer support, but as a way for technology providers to share their knowledge in a productive way.

  • While so much of our work has been focused on tearing down the barriers to entry for newer users, this would be an ideal project to also focus on where we can add features for more engaged users: what new ways could they participate?

We eventually came to a potential solution (Collectives) which we felt adhered to these criteria, and addressed our initial design sprint mission. The concept consisted of a few parts, including: badges on user cards for verified employees/topic experts, a way for technology providers to indicate an existing answer represented best practice, and some kind of page for an organisation to showcase their relevant tags and other pertinent information.

Early Feedback

The first time we researched these concepts with users (as part of the 5-day design sprint), we learnt a lot. One common theme that emerged was that these concepts could help instill trust in an answer, help answer-seekers get to solutions quicker, and potentially help with the issues of outdated answers and identifying canonical answers when it came to duplicates. On the other hand we were cautioned to be careful with not changing things like sort order, so we wouldn’t hurt the democratised nature of the site.

A couple of other highlights from these early research sessions included:

  • When it came to verified employees/topic experts, our research participants saw value here, but only if we maintained relevance. It was critical that these badges were scoped; they should only appear when a user participated on tags which they actually had expertise in. We also got positive feedback about the fact this would be a great way to recognise members on the site who continually contribute their expertise to certain topic areas. On the flip side, we learned that the word ‘verified’ had the wrong connotations (thus beginning a near 18 month struggle for us on what to call this role, with at least 15 different potential names...). "Verified" reminded participants of social media, and we have no desire to become a social media platform.

  • The idea of technology providers being able to mark existing answers on the platform as representing best practice was very popular in research. Some users pointed out that this could potentially be a useful way of designating a canonical answer when handling duplicates. Back then we were calling this concept ‘endorsed answers’, which was not a popular term, and one that non-native English speakers felt was particularly unclear (we weren’t having a good run with copywriting!). So we renamed this to ‘recommended answers’, and this is the one part of the concept that hasn’t changed significantly since our design sprint.

At the end of the design sprint, we were still just scratching the surface of what we needed to learn from Stack Overflow users. We had a million questions about how these features may help or hurt the community, what would make a good collective, what additional features might make this idea more complete, etc. So we began a series of what we called ‘research sprints’, which were essentially intensive blocks of focused research, aiming to address our biggest open questions and hypotheses. I could write a book with all that we learned from our research participants, so I’ll try and cover what I thought were the most interesting and impactful findings...

Key findings: Articles

The appetite for longer form content was something we’d heard in the past, but also dug into as part of our research sprints. For example, 23.1% of responses to a survey we ran of visitors to Stack Overflow (n=1010) said they believed how-to guides would be a positive addition to the site. We also know that plenty of contributors have tried to make content that would really be better suited to an article fit into a Q&A format. Overall, the feedback we got through surveys and interviews was that, with the right guardrails, this could be a positive addition to the site.

And speaking of guardrails, the first thing so many of our participants said to us was: “How do you make sure Articles don’t go the same way as Documentation?’ Which was a very valid question. Exploring this topic filled more than one research sprint for me. I read every post I could find on meta (and there were a lot). We dug up all our internal documentation and research on the project, as well as spoke to several people who were part of the team that built and sunsetted the product originally.

There were several issues we heard about when it came to Documentation, but the ones brought up by our users most often were the influx of poor quality or repetitive content, as well as the rep gaming that occurred. These were, of course, problems we were keen not to repeat. So that brought us to our first key decision on this feature: should we gate-keep Article contributions or let everyone create them? We settled somewhere in the middle.

While at the time of launch we are limiting Article creation to Recognised Members of a collective, that will be a temporary thing. As mentioned in Teresa’s post, we are planning on launching a review process where any member of a collective can submit Articles that will then be reviewed by the Recognised Members of that collective.

In our customer research, something that we discussed was that in order to make this review process successful, customers should be clear about the type and style of Article that would make a good addition to the collective. Hopefully this should go some way to start addressing the first issue we saw with Documentation, helping to raise the bar quality-wise and ensuring that we aren’t just seeing repetition of existing help docs and documentation. Our first two collectives have been provided with advice on this topic.

The other factor when it came to quality was making sure voting was part of the mix. In our initial designs we only had an upvote-style button to signal good quality. But through research we heard that users didn’t want to see upvotes without downvotes. So we added a downvote option in, mirroring Q&A. Which brought us to the other problem we heard about with Documentation: reputation...

I’ll be honest in saying that rep was a topic we got extremely mixed reactions on. Nearly everyone we spoke to had a different take on how we should handle Article rep. So unfortunately, we haven’t found (and probably won’t find) a solution that everyone loves. Some users proposed a new bucket of rep for Article contributions, some encouraged us to offer more rep for Article creation to reflect the added effort it takes to write an Article, and others didn’t think rep should be part of the feature at all.

A concern some users had was that gaining rep from Articles may result in giving privileges on Q&A to users who don’t know the ins and outs of Q&A. With this feedback we spent a long while thinking about ways to limit rep gained from Articles based on Q&A participation, but these ideas simply proved too complex to communicate and build without confusion.

Eventually, after discussing it with several users through research, we settled on handling Article rep in just the same way as Q&A rep. But think of this like an experiment; we are mindful of the concerns some users have and we will monitor the impact this has closely. If we find friction added to the curation of Q&A content by users who have gained privileges exclusively through Article rep, we will revisit the issue.

Key findings: Customer research

Another topic we discussed at length with users was how organisations would interact on the platform. We spoke to some who had attempted to facilitate developer support on Stack Overflow before, and to users who had seen these efforts unfold. Some of the key things we learned from these discussions were that participation from organisations still had to be deeply technical, not be promotional, and perhaps most importantly, we needed organisations to be consistently active to actually see a positive community impact.

This spurred several rounds of research with potential customers. We aimed to understand if they would be willing to make this kind of commitment, and if so, how we could facilitate ongoing participation with this initiative.

This research led to two things. First, helping our team clearly understand what type of organisation we wanted to work with: ones that would take the time to understand the site, ensure they were putting dedicated resources towards participation, and didn’t see it as purely an outlet for marketing.

The second was that we would need to build out dashboards to help Recognised Members target where to participate on the site. There’s obviously a million ways someone could contribute and we wanted to help make sure Collectives would enhance the community, and fill in the gaps. Part of the dashboards we designed include curated lists to help focus participation, e.g. one of the lists is ‘questions over 30 hours old without an answer’. We hope these curated dashboards will help our customers enrich their community on the site.

Key findings: Moderation

Besides customers and users, there was also another group we were keen to speak to: Stack Overflow Moderators. We were lucky enough to be able to consistently interview several mods throughout our discovery process. These interviews brought a unique perspective to our designs, and helped us consider rules, guidelines, and community health, as well as assess possible abuse vectors.

Some key topics we covered with participating Stack Overflow moderators were how moderation of new features should be handled, and whether there should be any new rules. One big takeaway from these interviews was that the mod team should moderate the majority of new features, with the option to pull in a Community Manager from our staff where they feel appropriate. We were concerned about the potential added workload, but most of the Stack Overflow moderators we spoke to felt that this wouldn’t meaningfully impact their workload. We will review this in the next couple of months and see whether that has proven to be the case or not, but in the interim we also implemented two feature requests (1, 2) that we hope will help in case things do become busier.

On the topic of new rules, we didn’t end up adding much. It was agreed that the new content types should still adhere to the existing Stack Overflow rules, licenses, and on-topic guidelines. However, the one thing we were encouraged to do was to provide our customers with guidelines and help docs to ensure their expectations about community norms and rules are set. We’ve done many demos and sessions with our launch customers, and have written several new help docs, and will continue adding to this as the product evolves.


There were dozens more topics we discussed in research, including: our ongoing saga with what to name the new roles and features, how to handle potentially off-topic questions, how to prevent vote fraud, assessing several new content types, possible incentives other than rep, notifications, and so much more. I’d need another 10,000 words at least to cover all of that, and this post is already getting long, but I will do my best to answer any questions you might have.

The time and energy that users and moderators have put into sharing their opinions and giving these concepts careful thought and consideration is amazing. If we had launched this initiative without any feedback it would have looked very different, and I am personally really happy about just how much we have learned from community members over the last year and a bit. And as I mentioned above, this isn’t the end of feedback - we will closely monitor usage data, and we’ll be continuing to touch base with users and will investigate all feedback we receive, so please feel free to share and the product team will aim to respond.


Check out the Go Language Collective and the Google Cloud Collective.

For those who want to understand what Product Research looks like at Stack Overflow: Through qualitative and quantitative research, we work to understand the needs, motivations, and pain points of the community and of customers to help guide the direction of our products. This is both in terms of what products should be built, but also how they should be executed. We see ourselves as advocates for the users, and often partner with Community Management, Product Management, Product Design, and Data.

25
  • 15
    Welcome, @mfox. There's definitely a lot to take in here; but did you all ever ask the community members you surveyed if they even thought a commercial partnership with an organization to give them a platform for their content was what users wanted? Jun 23 at 16:13
  • 35
    I was part of this research; it left me impressed with how (at least some parts of) the company genuinely wants to work with the community on these new features. Yes, the company needs to be profitable; yes, at some points that will conflict with the ideals of a perfect Q&A community. The questions I was asked indicated the team was thinking critically about how to make the tradeoff as sanely as possible, and they did listen to and incorporate a lot of my feedback.
    – Undo Mod
    Jun 23 at 16:27
  • 6
    @EmondErno The same SO mod team you know and love/hate is going to be moderating this; it's a question they asked a few times in research sessions and put a lot of thought into. It appears the default here is going to be that these'll be moderated by us, and that'll only change if it becomes overwhelming in some way. And it's hard to overwhelm SO mods.
    – Undo Mod
    Jun 23 at 16:29
  • 8
    So... just another case of excluding the community from research
    – Kevin B
    Jun 23 at 16:57
  • 15
    The people involved deserve some benefit of the doubt here, @KevinB. Yes, meta posts with screenshots early on would be better than closed-door research sessions. But (1) they mention this on meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/408585/… under the "Why didn’t you ask for feedback on Meta earlier?" header (not sure how much I buy that, but it's their claim), and (2) meta posts aren't part of the culture of the company anymore. I give them credit for talking to at least some established community members (no idea who the others were).
    – Undo Mod
    Jun 23 at 17:01
  • 9
    I don’t blame them for not making this more public, it’s much easier to hide what this product is when there isn’t a visible development process occurring in real time.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 23 at 17:04
  • 22
    "the company genuinely wants to work with the community on these new features" I don't buy that. Every step of the way we're excluded from participating unless we're part of some ridiculously small group of users that are hand picked or filtered by race/gender/age. It's rather clear the community is no longer part of the process, only a line in the marketing plan.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 23 at 18:14
  • 3
    Thanks for the summary of the research behind this new feature. It surely was quite a lot of effort that went into it. Still I'm not sure if it will really help the community in the long run. What I really liked was that so far we were all equal, just users, no exception except for a few diamonds. This seems to have changed. Well, let's hope for the best. Time will tell. Just one question: what exactly is the difference between an article and self-answered Q&A? It might be used interchangeably.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 23 at 21:35
  • 3
    ... but in the interim we also implemented two feature requests (1, 2)... I noticed that both of the posts haven't been tagged as [status-completed]... Jun 23 at 22:07
  • 3
    Good spot @Sabito錆兎 - will look into this!
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 22:45
  • 3
    @mfox "Personally I think that's ok (but please let me know if you feel that would be a problem)." I don't think that's a problem per se and time will tell how well they can coexist. It would hint a bit at redundancy and currently it's not clear to me how quality control of articles will be done. Self-answered Q&A are part of the ecosystem and for example can be closed or alternative answers can be given. With articles it might be different and that might work better or worse.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 24 at 8:33
  • 5
    NDAs aren't some big bad awful conspiracy to overthrow the community. It's a contractual, legally binding way to keep something secret during development. It's widely used and very common in the market research world; I really don't think it indicates that SE somehow wasn't actually looking for "real" or "actual" feedback, however that's being defined. That sentiment undermines the opinions and work put in by those that were in the test group.
    – zcoop98
    Jun 24 at 14:35
  • 16
    If you curate who is leaving feedback, you control what feedback is being given.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 24 at 14:51
  • 4
    @mfox Thanks for all of this detail - really appreciate it. One suggestion - "Key Findings" is a wall of text and pretty hard to parse, it would be good to use subheadings there to break it up a little and make it easier to scan. The top part was done really well there but it seems like you ran out of steam at that point :)
    – Joe
    Jun 24 at 16:33
  • 5
    Note that as stated here the community participants had to sign an NDA in order to provide feedback. The manner in which these participants were selected, what was their feedback and how it was implemented is completely opaque and goes against the entire spirit of the Meta community.
    – Boaz
    Jun 25 at 7:15
29

It seems like, from reading through answers and comments both here and on the initial announcement, that a very large concern floating in people's minds is the infusion of content onto the platform by collectives that are paying to be here.

Put another way, can you speak to the apparent conflict of interest between hosting content that's created by paying customers, and curating/ moderating that content to adhere to our existing standards? There's obvious corporate interest in maintaining the high-quality library that Stack Overflow is already, but it seems there are fears by the community that keeping the content of paying customers around regardless of our standards might become a temptation, either now or in the future.

Your post certainly addresses this tension to some degree already, and it's reassuring to read that it's been considered in a number of ways so far, eg.:

While Stack Overflow needs paid products in order to operate, we want to do this by adding value to the community, not changing things for the worse. So we settled on the following mission statement for our design sprint: “How might we enable companies to build relationships with the Stack Overflow community in a way that improves Stack Overflow as a resource for developers?”

...It was agreed that the new content types should still adhere to the existing Stack Overflow rules, licenses, and on-topic guidelines. However, the one thing we were encouraged to do was to provide our customers with guidelines and help docs to ensure their expectations about community norms and rules are set. We’ve done many demos and sessions with our launch customers, and have written several new help docs, and will continue adding to this as the product evolves.

There were dozens more topics we discussed in research, including: our ongoing saga with what to name the new roles and features, how to handle potentially off-topic questions, how to prevent vote fraud, assessing several new content types, possible incentives other than rep, notifications, and so much more...

I'd just really love to hear a little more about this idea directly, and about whether you feel you've adequately addressed that conflict overall.

4
  • Re "maintaining the high-quality library that Stack Overflow is already": Have you tried to use Stack Overflow as a research tool recently? What did the search engine hits look like? What search terms did you use? Jun 23 at 23:16
  • 7
    Fantastic question and feels like something many are wondering. I'll address this in a few parts. First, I think it's important to note that many of the employees and recognised members were already active contributors to SO before this project. So while it is technically content that's (in part) being created by paying customers, these users have a very thorough understanding of the type of content that should be on the site, and what the rules are. I think this helps set the tone that we are looking for (which basically = no special treatment).
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 23:38
  • 5
    Second, we have made several decisions we hope will make our position clear to customers: their content will be subject to the same rules and on topic guidelines as everyone else, their content will be moderated by SO mods, and that this is a space for technical content not promotion. We will definitely continue user research to see whether the community feels these standards are being adhered to. But from having personally spent hours researching with our launch customers, i feel they 'get it' -I think the quickest way to turn the community off would be to start trying to promote within Q&A!
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 23:44
  • 9
    @mfox "their content will be subject to the same rules and on topic guidelines" Then why does "dozens more topics we discussed in research" include "how to handle potentially off-topic questions"? What is your plan for when (inevitably & likely immediately) your customers complain that their customers complain that SO isn't "nice"?
    – philipxy
    Jun 24 at 7:37
26

Even though the Stack Overflow community could only be included very late, I'm still impressed by the thorough research and how it's presented here. The 12 selected people might not be very representative of the whole world and the community here would have been really good at extracting weak points of concepts, but I hope the feature will work out for the better. It seems a bit risky ("needs to be done right"...) and the connection to monetization is a bit worrisome. My impression is that the next days and weeks will be crucial for the success.

In that spirit I cut right to the chase and present this answer as a list of "what can possibly go wrong" so you may be able to move quickly should any of these fears actually materialize.

What problem is Collectives™ supposed to solve?

The initial angle seems more like: "we want to make more money, can we do it in a way that also improves our product?".

Usually, an improvement is easier to detect and quantify if there are concrete lists of problems that exist and need to be solved. Leaving the money aspect aside, what do you hope for from the Collectives™ initiative? Would it be possible to somehow measure the success of the initiative (like a higher percentage of questions answered...)?

Are relationships to companies in any way necessary to improve Stack Overflow as a resource?

You asked yourself:

“How might we enable companies to build relationships with the Stack Overflow community in a way that improves Stack Overflow as a resource for developers?”

Stack Overflow as a resource is something like a knowledge library. It's mostly about the creation, quality of and access to the content. I'm not sure that relationships with companies are in any way necessary to improve the quality of the content. What does Collectives™ provide in that regard that wasn't able to be done before?

You write

..a way for technology providers to share their knowledge in a productive way.

Do technology providers want to share their knowledge for free (or even pay for it)? Is the current way not productive enough? In what way is the current approach (without Collectives) deficient?

Are verified employees/topic experts really more knowledgeable than random users?

You write

.. concept consisted of [..] badges on user cards for verified employees/topic experts

This seems to indicate that special trust shall be given to verified employees and topic experts. The usual rules say that one should only judge the content independently by the author. I'm not sure how topic experts are verified (reputation or silver and gold badges in a topic seemed to be the old style) but with employees I would actually be a bit mistrusting. The quality they deliver might still vary a lot. I believe that in the end, the content should still speak for itself mostly and that this kind of endorsement could even make things worse than before.

Who should decide what best practice is?

You write

..concept consisted of [..] a way for technology providers to indicate an existing answer represented best practice

Best practice might be simply what works best in practice and so far the score gave a hint of best practice. As far as I understood it the recommendation label does not influence the sorting order, but it might have influence indirectly (via a bias on the voting) and may lead to people using answers that were marked as best practice even though they weren't best practice in practice.

Example: If Google says you should do it like this and 200 users voted for another way, which advice should one follow? But if on the other side both measures coincide, why actually bother to do both? The recommendation feature might be redundant.

How would you get solutions quicker?

You write

these concepts could help [..] answer-seekers get to solutions quicker

Not sure how this is supposed to happen? At least this is measurable, but I can only imagine that people get solutions quicker if there are more experts present. Where will they be coming from?

Are there problems with finding canonical duplicate targets?

You write

mark existing answers on the platform as representing best practice [..] be a useful way of designating a canonical answer when handling duplicates.

I'm not aware of big problems there. Usually, there is a highly scored Q&A as duplicate target and within that is a couple of highly scored answers that together answer the closed question. Is this supposed to now directly link to answers as duplicate targets instead of Q&As? It did not become clear to me how this would help in handling duplicates.

How will articles interact with the rest of the Q&A?

You write

The appetite for longer form content was something we’d heard in the past [..] responses to a survey [..] said they believed how-to guides would be a positive addition to the site.

The typical blog post isn't much longer than the allowed maximal length on an answer in Q&A and how-to questions are one of the most popular question types of Q&A. I imagine what you mean here is less focused questions, something we would usually reject as a question because the solution would fill books. I hope that indeed articles will be really extensive kind of tutorials but I foresee many other problems with them (like can they be closed, can they act as duplicates, what if I disagree with an article, can I post my version of it, quality control...) but the biggest one would be missing collaborative effort. In a Q&A everyone can post a contribution, making it a collaborative effort resulting in high quality. In an article, probably not (or we would have recreated Wikipedia), or yes? The relation of articles to Q&A (especially self-answered) is not clear and might lead to redundancies. Articles might not be needed or might not integrate well with Q&A.

Will dashboards really make a decisive impact?

You write

We hope these curated dashboards will help our customers enrich their community on the site.

And one example of a dashboard mentioned is ‘questions over 30 hours old without an answer’, however, knowing how many questions aren't answered yet, doesn't really answer them by itself. Higher activity would be needed to actually make a difference. More dashboards are surely not hurting and I would wish they would be available in general, but their impact might be smaller than anticipated if other key elements are missing like increased activity.

Summary: major points that could go wrong

  • Problem description could be clearer/more detailed, how would the success of the initiative be measured?
  • Adds social like features (relationships with companies, badges for employees) which might take away focus on content.
  • Might lead to voting bias (through badges and recommendations) and lower quality of content.
  • Articles may not be easily integrated into the Q&A ecosystem.
  • Adds overhead while benefits might not materialize.
17
  • 3
    (1/2) “we want to make more money, can we do it in a way that also improves our product?” - This feels more or less accurate. We will be measuring things like decrease in unanswered q’s, decrease in time to answer, etc. As we continue to develop Collectives feature we would also like to target more curation metrics (e.g. fewer dupes, fewer closed q’s, more reopened q’s, etc.). So maybe these aren’t all ‘problems’ but things that can be improved.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:36
  • (2/2) We also want to measure how this will impact the answer seeker’s experience (we hope this will improve). And just as a reminder: we’ve been clear that this is a beta feature. We do expect to continue to iterate and improve it
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:36
  • “Are relationships to companies in any way necessary to improve Stack Overflow as a resource?” - I wouldn’t say necessary, but I would say they can improve SO as a resource. There is unique value that the creator or maintainer of a technology can bring to the table, and that is exactly what our ideal use case here would be. “Do technology providers want to share their knowledge for free” - Yes, many do! They see benefits in going to where the tech community is. Orgs we’ve spoken to have said they don’t know where to get started with engaging with SO, and they see this as a way to help them.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:37
  • (1/2) “Are verified employees/topic experts really more knowledgeable…?” - No. But potentially having low rep on SO doesn’t minimise the expertise of these employees, and we hope that they can share this expertise. And I'd like to point out that plenty of these employees are active, very high rep users too, and that the company has selected several other high rep recognised members.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:37
  • 1
    (2/2) Their answers will still be judged by the community, and while you are right that this will draw attention, I think with that comes a mix of praise and harsher critique. I hope we will see balance, but we will for sure measure and assess in the coming months. The topic experts are primarily going to be those who are already tag badge holders, so I think we know what we’re in for there.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:37
  • “Who should decide what best practice is?” - In this case, we mean best practice according to the maker or maintainer of the technology. Research participants have consistently said that there is value to this. They shared several use cases that they see this being particularly useful. Two are when the accepted answer is not the best answer for a wide audience, and when there may be a newer and better answer to an old question that fails to match the upvotes of the old answers.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:38
  • “How would you get solutions quicker?” - This is something that we have heard from answer seekers through research. Only time will tell if it does have the effect we hope for. You ask where more experts will come from; we know that there are plenty of experts out there that don’t use SO. Hopefully some of the new features (if not the current ones, then some future ones) can offer them new ways to contribute and share their knowledge.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:38
  • “Are there problems with finding canonical duplicate targets?” - Yes, we have heard this countless times from active contributors. Again, this is something we can measure, so will keep an eye on!
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:38
  • 1
    “How will articles interact with the rest of the Q&A?” - Good question, and the answer is we’re still figuring it out. All your concerns are helpful and I have noted them down for us to factor into future research. On the collaboration front, this is something we want to improve and are actively working on. In the interim, you can still suggest edits to the author both publicly (via comments) or privately (via the feedback modal linked to under the vote buttons).
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:38
  • “Will dashboards really make a decisive impact?” - You hit the nail on the head by saying that dashboards will not be useful without increased activity. We also see that as a key part of this working. We hope that the dashboards will help, and we will continue to update them as we find new ways for recognised members and employees to contribute to the site. I also like your idea of making some of these ‘queues’ (for lack of a better word), public. We will explore this!
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:38
  • 3
    One last thing I want to address is that we do not think those 12 users are representative. We believe in a mixed methods approach, meaning that we run both qualitative and quantitative research that complement each other. I.e. we spot themes in qualitative research (which were run with many users, not just the 12), then attempt to understand how representative those themes were via quantitative research (e.g. surveys). You’ve raised some great points here, so if you’re open to it, please consider opting into research if you haven’t already so we can pick your brain about this kind of thing!
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 0:39
  • 1
    @mfox Thank you for the exhaustive comments. Maybe a few more comments from me on the comments. I'm looking forward to see if there is a measurable impact like decrease in fraction of unanswered questions, even though one has to be careful, it should be at least upvoted answers .... You basically say that organization don't know how to take part in SO? I can hardly believe it. The hurdle to post content is really low, but then I don't know what they actually want to achieve. I always wanted to write a custom script to make SO look like without author names and their rep because ...
    – Trilarion
    Jun 25 at 14:31
  • 1
    @mfox To summarize the answer and comments: I'm worried about bias in voting and loss of focus on content and I think that articles must iterate quite a lot to become useful (integrate them more into the Q&A ecosystem and sell them as self-answered Q&A without the restriction to be focused, maybe detach them from collectives). I'm looking forward to see performance metrics results and how they develop and I'm open to the idea that organizations could bring something positive to SO. Let's see.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 25 at 14:46
  • 1
    I appreciate that summary and totally agree that we must closely monitor the things you mention, and also continue iterating on the current feature set. I also really appreciate the openness to seeing how things go.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 25 at 15:23
  • 1
    @mfox Sorry, I forgot one last thing. I really hope that people learn to ignore the badges that were introduced. We shouldn't praise nor put extra scrutiny on people just because of what they are. Everyone should be treated equally. It should really only count what somebody says. This feels very important to me and this new feature hasn't made it easier unfortunately. Just imagine I would have been a Google employee too all the time, would it change the importance of anything I've ever written on SO? I really hope not.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 25 at 17:00
18

Thanks for putting this together.

Note that this isn't intended to be antagonistic - I fear that a lot of what I say these days in terms of feedback is interpreted as such - but with this rollout, it feels like there was a lot of feedback collected but none of what I'd consider to be "core" questions were asked or considered.

First is the criterion on who was selected or how they were chosen.

We’ve collected a lot of feedback from users and moderators. We’ve spent over a hundred hours in 1-on-1 interviews with users and potential customers who have generously given their time to research sessions. We’ve also collected thousands of survey responses, and spent a lot of time reading through feature requests and feedback about past projects on Meta.

While we wanted a representative set of feedback, we had a focus on engaging with active, highly contributing Stack Overflow members and moderators. In particular we had a panel of 12 users and moderators who met with us consistently for the last year, and whose feedback has been invaluable.

  1. What constituted as "highly contributing" or "active"? Did this also factor in Meta participation, or other factors?
  2. You say that this has been going on for over a year; did perspectives or opinions change in that time frame?

To the core questions that I felt like were missed:

On the topic of new rules, we didn’t end up adding much. It was agreed that the new content types should still adhere to the existing Stack Overflow rules, licenses, and on-topic guidelines. However, the one thing we were encouraged to do was to provide our customers with guidelines and help docs to ensure their expectations about community norms and rules are set. We’ve done many demos and sessions with our launch customers, and have written several new help docs, and will continue adding to this as the product evolves.

  1. Was a core assumption made that the community should be responsible for content curation as opposed to the collective?

While Stack Overflow needs paid products in order to operate, we want to do this by adding value to the community, not changing things for the worse. So we settled on the following mission statement for our design sprint: “How might we enable companies to build relationships with the Stack Overflow community in a way that improves Stack Overflow as a resource for developers?”

  1. Was a core assumption made in that this would be something that the community finds desirable, either from a "keep the lights on" perspective (which in my head weighs less with the recent acquisition, but I'm not privy to anything else that isn't public) or from a "let's form a community" perspective? To that point, what kinds of questions were extracted from the position or posture of the community to begin, cultivate or foster such a relationship?
15
  • 4
    "You say that this has been going on for over a year; did perspectives or opinions change in that time frame?" Mine did - but the product was also changing. It's evolved a lot over the sessions I was involved in, and closely tracked much of my (and, I assume, the others') feedback. For example, by the end, I got the impression that the team understood which things they really shouldn't touch regarding Q&A. I have no idea about the commercial viability of this, but my confidence in the team's goodwill toward the community increased through the process.
    – Undo Mod
    Jun 23 at 16:38
  • 4
    "Was a core assumption made that the community should be responsible for content curation as opposed to the collective?" I was fairly forceful with an "If it's indexed by Google, it should be under some form of the existing curation system" opinion. They seem to have chosen that path. It's yet to be seen how well it will actually work, but I do think it's the right starting point.
    – Undo Mod
    Jun 23 at 16:41
  • 2
    @Undo: On that position I would forcefully disagree; from my perspective, the external forces leveraging Stack Overflow as a means of offloading the Q&A aspect of their product should be taking a far more active role in handling these kinds of questions. Even if today the beta rolls out with widely known products, Tomorrow™ it could be done with something more niche with the community left in a lurch on what to do about those questions.
    – Makoto
    Jun 23 at 16:46
  • 12
    I don't get why the community is left in the lurch. I'd much rather have the content moderated using our existing content moderation system, which keeps it in our control, rather than turning it over to some paying entity who will have, as you yourself pointed out, a weaker grasp of how content should be moderated here, what works and what doesn't, and financial motives aside from building a library of high-quality Q&A. (Unlike Undo, I wasn't involved in any way with the research conducted by SE, so this is all brand-new to me, too, and I'm still trying to digest the implications.)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 23 at 16:49
  • 3
    @CodyGray: My concern is that our motives are mutually exclusive and I don't know the right way to have resolved that besides requiring that groups have representatives with a sufficient amount of site reputation and who already know how we curate content. If that can't happen, then I would much rather the paying entity be responsible for this, since - well, I have no way of being assured that My™ innocent moderation wouldn't provoke some kind of contractual ire on Their™ paid space. I don't know that mess, don't want to know that mess, and I definitely don't want to own it.
    – Makoto
    Jun 23 at 16:53
  • 6
    And that's a valid position. My opinion is that we are far more qualified to handle issues on the platform, and with us moderating it there's less likely to be intractable drama with us in the loop. Further, I think it'll be easier to get out of the loop if we decide to, rather than to take over moderation functions from companies who got used to having them.
    – Undo Mod
    Jun 23 at 16:53
  • 5
    But yes, there are going to be competing interests here. Maybe rare, maybe common. I'd rather have SO mods involved in the process so we can at least notice when something becomes a mess, rather than find out in 6 months that staff has been allowing blatantly terrible things "because they're a paying customer."
    – Undo Mod
    Jun 23 at 16:55
  • 6
    I may have to ultimately acquiesce here @Undo, as is the situation I find myself in often on company decisions these days, but the chief point I'll make is simple: With money being injected into the equation in regards to a space to publish or support external content, the fundamental relationship between the company and curators has been permanently altered. It is no longer the case that we - the community - can decide what kind of content we want; it may be subject to whatever contracts these other parties can get.
    – Makoto
    Jun 23 at 17:02
  • 11
    With that, I simply cannot in good conscience consent to the notion of continuing to curate any content that is backed by a collective. It is my belief that the community no longer controls it, nor does it have any further say on it.
    – Makoto
    Jun 23 at 17:02
  • 3
    "What constituted as "highly contributing" or "active"? Did this also factor in Meta participation, or other factors?" - Several factors, and yes Meta participation was definitely one of them. Other recruitment factors included being above a certain rep level, and having been actively answering and curating content during the last 6 months. We also aimed for a geographically diverse spread of users, as different cultures have very different takes on design and copy. Most of the users on this panel were tag badge holders, and had contributed to Meta (though some less so recently)
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 23:01
  • 3
    "You say that this has been going on for over a year; did perspectives or opinions change in that time frame?" I think Undo explained this well - yes, opinions and perspectives changed massively. I personally came into this project with the mindset that every assumption I had was wrong; or phrased another way, I wanted to critically assess everything that the team and I thought was true. Some of those assumptions did turn out to be true, others not so much, and that meant changes to the designs. Research participants also called out MANY things we didn't ask about, which was also meant change.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 23:08
  • 2
    "Was a core assumption made that the community should be responsible for content curation as opposed to the collective?" Undo covered this, but one extra thing, more about curation than moderation. We expect most employees and recognised members to be actively contributing members. They will earn privileges the same way others do. In the dashboards we've made, we encourage them to participate in curation. The majority of users we heard from were keen for moderation to still fall to our mods, but I hope Collectives will help towards the (often thankless) task of day-to-day curation & cleanup.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 23:17
  • 2
    To your last question, I hope I am interpreting correctly (feel free to clarify if not). Our first big research question was whether there would be value to developers. Part of the product led process that has been mentioned before is that we approach every project by assessing value to developers. If there isn't value, the project simply won't continue (this comes before considering the commercial viability). Some of the benefits research participants mentioned: getting to a working answer quicker, new ways to participate, helping designate canonical answers when it comes to dupes, and more.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 23:24
  • What is considered "curating" content?
    – Kevin B
    Jun 24 at 14:26
  • I may be somewhat pessimistic, but I feel that curating content that owned by a collective without being a member or even a recognized member of that collective may turn out to get one into trouble. So shying away from doing that could be the result. That leaves the company and the users that are accepted by said company to do the curation with whatever metrics they prefer.
    – Scratte
    Jun 24 at 19:00
13

Are collectives expected to be utilized by various specification committees? For example, TC39 for ECMAScript, or WG21 for C++? During the feedback gathering, has Stack Overflow reached out to any such committees to determine if Collectives was a product they would consider taking advantage of for connecting with and informing developers?

5
  • I just noticed it's possible I'm responding to the wrong thread with this. Either that or I'm misunderstanding the purpose of Collectives. Jun 23 at 17:34
  • 1
    Either this question or the main feature announcement would be a reasonable place to ask this question. This question is more focused on the research effort and methodology that was done leading up to the launch (which seems to better match your second question). The other thread is for general questions/concerns. I think it’s okay in either place.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 23 at 23:47
  • 3
    Absolutely! As part of the research process, we spoke with several foundations that support open source software. As Teresa phrased in in her post, we want to engage with organisations that 'help build or maintain' technologies. Personally, this is a use case that I am excited for, and one that we are working towards making a reality. Of course the commercial relationship would work differently in these cases, but I am not the best person to speak to that.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 23 at 23:53
  • 1
    @mfox any particular names among those "several foundations"? What was some of the specific feedback they gave regarding how they expected to be able to use Collectives? Was their feedback different in any way from that of potential corporate customers? Jun 24 at 1:14
  • 5
    @PatrickRoberts I don't think I can share names yet, but I will check and add them if possible. Some things they liked: being able to recognise key maintainers and being able to centralise engagement around technical content (some felt they were currently split across too many channels). A key reservation: they don't have the same sort of employee structure as corporates, and this could mean resourcing issues when it came to helping with curation and contribution within the Collective. There were many parallels in feedback between them and corporates - we saw less differences than I expected.
    – mfox Staff
    Jun 24 at 1:36
13

.. concept consisted of [..] badges on user cards for verified employees/topic experts

No.

One of main appeals of SE to me is being "self-made". Someone with an academic title is not necessarily more knowledgeable than someone without. It'll incentivize judging content by allotted authority rather than objective merit. This not even discussing who decides "verified". There's plenty of room in "About me" for a CV.

You're smart? Prove it like the rest of us.

1
  • 4
    I first thought that it might be to allow newly registered people which have not much rep but are experts to gain instant authority, but it's not needed for anything. Just post good content and people will upvote you.
    – Trilarion
    Jun 24 at 19:16

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .