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I've made a userscript for enabling moderation features and I've found many MSO posts where it would be relevant to post an answer or a comment. So far, I've only posted one answer and one comment. I would like to post more about this on several posts where it is completely relevant, but I'm afraid that it would be considered spam. Is it okay to post a large number of relevant comments and answers on meta sites?

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    I've migrated it here because the only community that can decide whether certain types of posts are welcome on MSO is MSO itself...
    – Glorfindel
    Jun 12 at 21:17
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    @Anonymous Well, the answer part is unlikely to become welcome here, since that would mean all the answered questions should rather be closed as duplicates, if that answer is really appropriate. Jun 12 at 21:19
  • @Glorfindel I was intending to ask about the Stack Exchange community at large (just using MSO as an example, but I suppose it's more relevant here... Jun 12 at 21:19
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    Given that your scripts are aimed at Teams, MSO is the right place. Otherwise, I'd pick Meta Stack Exchange.
    – Glorfindel
    Jun 12 at 21:22
  • @πάνταῥεῖ What if the answer is different but both would be useful to have a link? Jun 12 at 21:23
  • Evidently the community here doesn't think it's relevant, or else it wouldn't have 3 downvotes so shortly after posting. Jun 12 at 21:24
  • And now people are downvoting my Stack Apps post (for no reason). This is why I didn't post it on MSO. Jun 12 at 21:41
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    This question is basically asking, "I did something I think is cool, is it ok if I mention it in a bunch of places?" While this might be a reasonable question, it's also possible that some users see this as needless self-promotion, which is not viewed favorably. It's also possible that users are unhappy with your frequent complaints about downvotes. Getting unexplained downvotes is just one of the realities of posting content, and I'd suggest you just get used to it.
    – cigien
    Jun 12 at 21:47
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    As to your StackApps post being downvoted, well, you literally just asked (indirectly) a wider audience to review it. Complaining about getting negative feedback after that is not really in good taste.
    – cigien
    Jun 12 at 21:47
  • @cigien "Getting unexplained downvotes is just one of the realities of posting content, and I'd suggest you just get used to it." - it's happening on every post, every time, and in a large number... "As to your StackApps post being downvoted, well, you literally just asked (indirectly) a wider audience to review it." - I don't see what could be wrong with the script. "While this might be a reasonable question, it's also possible that some users see this as needless self-promotion, which is not viewed favorably." A) It isn't needless B) I tried to post this on Stack Apps but it got migrated. Jun 12 at 21:50
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    Relevant: stackapps.com/questions/6192/…
    – Nick
    Jun 12 at 21:53
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    I'm afraid I'd be repeating myself, but you're basically insisting that all the negative feedback you've been getting is in no way your own fault. Do you imagine that there's some conspiracy against you, or your content? There isn't, I can assure you of that. You might want to incorporate the feedback that you get, instead of just insisting that you're right, and pretty much everyone else isn't. You'll have a better experience going forward if you try to do that.
    – cigien
    Jun 12 at 21:54
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    @cigien How can I incorporate feedback if there's no explanation? Jun 12 at 21:55
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    I'm not referring to this post specifically, but several of the other posts you've made that you claim have been unfairly negatively received. If you sincerely think you've not received any feedback on how you can improve the questions you post, then I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on that.
    – cigien
    Jun 12 at 22:00
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The self-promotion guidelines are essentially the same on Meta as they are on the main site. They're all covered in this Help Center article. I'd quote the relevant bits here, but they're really all relevant, so you'd do well to read and follow them.

A common misunderstanding is that these rules were developed only to prevent people from profiting financially from contributions. That is to say, that they would not apply to the promotion of open-source projects or other efforts that are strictly meant for "public good". That is not the case. Several years ago, Brad Larson wrote a really great answer on Meta that we moderators still link to regularly when confronted with the objection "…but, this is an open-source project!". Userscripts are almost necessarily open-source and generally always developed for the general good of the community, but that doesn't make them an exception to our promotion rules.

Posting an answer that solves a problem is fundamentally useful, whether it's on the main site or on the Meta site. So, if someone is experiencing frustration with one of the site's features or anti-features, and you have a userscript that solves that problem, then posting an answer that provides a link to the userscript, an explanation of how to use it, a demonstration of how it solves the problem, and a disclaimer of your affiliation is a useful contribution.

Note that just because a contribution is useful in the abstract doesn't mean that everyone will like it or be supportive of it. Therefore, you may receive downvotes on such answers. There are zillions of possible reasons why someone may choose to downvote an answer like this. Maybe they're reacting negatively to what they perceive as self-promotion. The tone, style, and frequency of the answers has a lot to do with this, and it can often be controlled, but not always. Some people are impossible to please. Or, maybe they think your script doesn't really solve the problem, so it's essentially irrelevant. Or, maybe they tried to use your script, but it didn't work for them. Or, maybe they think it's a bad idea to write scripts that work around site bugs, because that could discourage the developers from taking the time to fix them. Who knows. Take the feedback for what it is: someone on the Internet disagrees that this is a useful/correct/relevant/helpful post.

For what it's worth, you're in good company posting userscripts in answers to Meta questions. We have lots of community members who do it (CertainPerformance is merely one who comes to my mind immediately), and many of these posts receive upvotes. In fact, it just so happens that one diamond moderator is a prolific author of userscripts and often "plugs" his own scripts. He's not immune from downvotes, but these are generally well-received. (In large part because the scripts are just so darn useful and well-written.)

I would encourage you to post answers, rather than comments. I would also encourage you to avoid "a large number of" anything, at least at first. Build up some goodwill, put in some time with the community, and see how it goes. Ramp up your participation and promotion over time, as you see positive feedback from the community.


As far as specific feedback, the answer you started with is…not great. It is in need of improvement on several fronts. First, it starts with the word "this". What is "this"? The question is a how-to question, asking how to get access to tools, and you say "this is useful"? What's useful? Are you trying to tell the person that the thing they are asking how to do is useful? Yeah, I expect they know that. As such, the bulk of your answer doesn't seem to be adding anything to the post. The real substance of the answer is just this line:

These features are still there - just hidden by the UI. I've created a userscript to show them.

Unfortunately, that's buried at the bottom. More unfortunately, there's nothing in the body of the answer itself that shows to use your userscript, shows how it works, or describes which specific features that it unlocks. A good "how to" answer is a good "how to" answer, whether it's describing how to install and use a userscript, or how to install and use a Visual Studio extension.

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  • "More unfortunately, there's nothing in the body of the answer itself that shows to use your userscript" - if they're interested, they can easily enough read on Stack Apps how to use it, and I don't want the answer to look too much like an advertisement and more like an actual answer. Jun 14 at 22:16

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