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Sometimes people delete their own stuff in annoying ways.

I asked this question: Efficiently find which range a value belongs to

Within a few minutes someone had answered it, and while the output is correct, I had asked for an efficient solution. After explaining in a comment why their solution wasn't efficient enough for me, they deleted it. Sure, okay, I guess, they want to protect themself from downvotes - I wasn't going to downvote it, but they can't possibly know that. Personally, I would have preferred that answer to stay there, because for small cases it's a fine answer, and it would hopefully deter other similar answers from wasting my time. Now that a good answer is there, though, that probably wasn't going to happen - no big deal, but a bit annoying that their fear of karma loss is such a motivating factor.

What annoys me more is that, before the good answer showed up, they asked a question in a comment. This was a very good question to ask, because if the answer was yes, there would be an extremely efficient answer. However, I said the answer was no, and at some point (before or after the good answer appeared, I am not sure) the comment was deleted, leaving me replying to thin air. It's quite frustrating.

I suppose there is nothing to be done about it, but maybe it can stir some interesting discussion at least.

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    Comments are "second class citizens"; you should expect them to "disappear" at a whim and without warning. If information truly is pertinent, then it should be added to the answer/question. – Larnu Jun 10 at 11:45
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    How do you know they deleted it out of fear for reputation-loss? And not because it "wasn't efficient enough"? – Scratte Jun 10 at 11:46
  • I can't know their underlying motive, you're absolutely correct. The answer was in a weird space though, where the efficiency seemed to be considered, just maybe not, as you put it, "enough". It doesn't bother me too much, deleting the answer. It was combined with the deleting of the perfectly good comment that leads me to think they are trying to protect something. And maybe that's not my place to say, I just find it a little frustrating. – Tom Carrick Jun 10 at 11:51
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    If they posted a comment under your question, instead of replying in a comment, the good thing to do is edit your question to incorporate the details. – yivi Jun 10 at 11:59
  • "You didn't "ask" for a more efficient approach." It is in the title, @charlietfl : "Efficiently find which range a value belongs to"; I would suggest that they did ask for an efficient way, even if they don't reiterate it in the body of the question. (And it's not like the OP edited it into the title later either, as there's no edit history on the question.) – Larnu Jun 10 at 12:03
  • I completely agree that you could and should incorporate good comments into the question body, but it doesn't really address my question of why delete the comment in the first place? – Tom Carrick Jun 10 at 12:04
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    The reason the comment was deleted could be many, @TomCarrick ; it could have been the OP, it might have been flagged, a passing mod might have deleted it. Like i mentioned at first, they are "second class citizens", you shouldn't expect them to be permanent. Which is why we suggest you put the information in the body of the post if they should be. – Larnu Jun 10 at 12:08
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    I delete my own comments all the time. Often when I want to disengage from a conversation and don't want to be pinged about it in the future. Again, you shouldn't expect count on other users comments to be there to improve your post. If someone asked for clarification, just edit the post and add it. Once you do that, your own dangling comment is irrelevant and can be deleted as well. – yivi Jun 10 at 12:13
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    Same with the answer. The user might have been unhappy about posting a sub-par answer, and didn't have the time to improve it or change, so they preferred to delete it. It's their prerogative. – yivi Jun 10 at 12:14
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    Maybe you should clarify in your question what criteria you use to define "effective" (run time, memory usage, code complexity,...) and also add additional information like expecting long lists... – samcarter_is_at_topanswers.xyz Jun 10 at 13:21
  • I don't see any comments on linked post that "replying to thin air." - there is a reasonable clarifying comment from OP ("The intervals can be of any length") which anyone can easily edit into the question... @TomCarrick did you deleted some other comments that you are talking about in this question (screenshot would be an option if you want to talk about comment but feel need to delete it, too late now obviously)? – Alexei Levenkov Jun 10 at 17:27
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    Also @TomCarrick consider making it clear that your key complain is "I said the answer does not answers my question and author deleted it instead of working to improve the answer to my satisfaction" (at least that how I read the post - maybe you mean something else - than definitely edit this question to clarify) – Alexei Levenkov Jun 10 at 17:30
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You've used the term "annoy(ed)" multiple times and implied some nefarious motive as well as being harmed by potential waste of your time.

This reads as both an over reaction and unrealistic sense of entitlement when people who volunteer their time attempt to help you and it doesn't work out the way you want. Your time is no more valuable than the person offering their own in a goodwill gesture.

If this was a paid service and there was an obligation to help you your complaint might be reasonable. However there is no such obligation in a volunteer community such as this.

If someone posts an answer and you critically tell them it doesn't fit your needs then getting upset when they delete it baffles me.

My suggestion is you reflect a bit more on what goes on when another person tries to help you and be more appreciative of those efforts rather than focusing on assumptions of nefarious intentions, gamification, entitlement etc.

You have not been harmed here

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    I answer a lot of questions, I will often immediately disengage if one of my answers, turns into a never ending wish list. I only address what is asked in the question, it it’s not explicitly asked in the question, don’t expect me to answer it – Security Hound Jun 11 at 11:36

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