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I was reviewing low quality posts this morning and I came across this review. My thought process/reaction was like this:

  1. The post contains some code that at least attempts to solve the problem. I did not evaluate the viability of the solution, but it looks like the answer tries to present one.
  2. There is little explanation about the code, but that can be edited in by the answerer.
  3. There is a link at the end that doesn't seem to add value. It should be removed.

So in an effort to address (3.), I clicked edit. As this was an audit review, I failed the audit because the answer was deleted as potential spam, and "minor edits... (I forget the wording) would not salvage the post. It should be deleted."

Now, I didn't recognize the link exactly as spam, just as something irrelevant to the answer. So I am wondering, if there is a potentially viable answer that contains a potentially spammy link, is it ever appropriate for an editor to simply remove that link?

A more targeted question from @RobertColumbia, who put it better than me:

It's also worth mentioning that the guidance for the LQP queue and the NAA flag explicitly provide that any attempt to answer the question is not subject to deletion, no matter how wrong, incompetent, buggy, or non-useful the answer actually is. So if you see an answer "Yes, you can reticulate the spline because strings are mutable in Java. Use the code GET COOL STUFF < 4 ; DOWNLOAD RAD XR &> code$ ", you are supposed to downvote it, not flag it. So if we see one of those with a blog link at the bottom, should we edit the link out and downvote, or should we flag as spam?

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    Is it ever appropriate to edit and remove potentially spam links? No. – rene Jun 2 at 15:13
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    See also: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/110030/… – rene Jun 2 at 15:14
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    Thanks for this question. I've been called out in chat for reverting edits where others have edited out spammy links from maybe-sorta-answers-the-question-if-you-squint-but-is-primarily-here-so-the-answerer-can-link-to-their-channel answers. So I guess it's not clear if a spammy link makes the entire answer spam, or if that only apples to spammy posts where the answer is clearly plagiarized/garbage/random code/etc. to get past the filter. – Robert Columbia Jun 2 at 15:30
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    "So I guess it's not clear if a spammy link makes the entire answer spam...." Thank you for putting it this way, that is basically the main thing I'm trying to understand here. – C. Peck Jun 2 at 15:32
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    It's also worth mentioning that the guidance for the LQP queue and the NAA flag explicitly provide that any attempt to answer the question is not subject to deletion, no matter how wrong, incompetent, buggy, or non-useful the answer actually is. So if you see an answer "Yes, you can reticulate the spline because strings are mutable in Java. Use the code GET COOL STUFF < 4 ; DOWNLOAD RAD XR &> code$ ", you are supposed to downvote it, not flag it. So if we see one of those with a blog link at the bottom, should we edit the link out and downvote, or should we flag as spam? – Robert Columbia Jun 2 at 15:38
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    @RobertColumbia right, exactly. I've had a flag declined in the past because the flag should be used on any attempt to answer the question even a "completely incorrect solution". So deletion didn't make sense to me here. – C. Peck Jun 2 at 15:39
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    The problem with removing the link is that in this case no spam flag is cast and thus no moderator will check the other actions of that user. Yes, the spam here is gone, but the author should also get investigated. I usually tend to go to the post, flag as spam and skip the review. – BDL Jun 2 at 16:01
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    @BDL exactly. I've responded to link removals with my own reversion (put the link back in) and flagging as spam, only for my actions to be criticized with something like "That post actually attempted to answer the question. The link to the answerer's paid IT training services was fluff and can be edited out". So does the fact that an answerer puts a signature linking to their company at the bottom of their answers make those answers spam, or is there more that is required before such behavior rises to the level of spam? – Robert Columbia Jun 2 at 16:08
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    It's easy to claim that such a distinction exists, but hard to actually apply it. Lots of spammers write some random useless screed answer that at least is not gibberish but is mostly an incompetent synthesis of various low-quality sources with marginal applicability to the question and then adds a link to dietary supplements. So do we flag that as spam, or edit out the dietary supplements link and then downvote the answer because it is an incompetent synthesis of various low-quality sources with marginal applicability to the question? – Robert Columbia Jun 2 at 16:14
  • Cross-site duplicate: Flagging questions as spam versus editing out advertising links. And the more general (possibly canonical) Should spam posts be edited?. – Peter Mortensen Jun 3 at 7:23
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There is one case where you can remove excessive self-promotion: non-plagiarized answers (make sure to check!) from new users that contain a signature or similar mention of the user's website with a signature of sorts, much as someone might have in a conventional forum. In that case, you can edit out the signature and gently inform them that Stack Overflow/Stack Exchange questions and answers are about content, and that they can put that information in their profile. If they keep doing it after being warned, then consider a custom moderator flag.


Hope this helps,

Ryan M

Visit my website at https://example.com for more great information!

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    See my edit which improved your answer – C. Peck Jun 2 at 18:25
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    I'll get the popcorn ... – rene Jun 2 at 18:26
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    @CPeck while I appreciate the dedication to editing out spammy signatures, I promise I don't actually own example.com :-) – Ryan M Jun 2 at 18:26
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    If you did own it you wouldn't be writing answers on some Meta site .... – rene Jun 2 at 18:29
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    Loved your site, +1. – Charles Jun 2 at 20:32
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    I think @C.Peck went meta on your meta in meta Ryan. – Alex Jun 3 at 15:23
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    I'm very glad you explicitly mentioned non-plagiarized answers. Copying (most/some of) another answer and adding a spam link is a fairly common trick. Don't know if the post in the audit was such, however. – Adrian Mole Jun 3 at 22:50
  • 'Thank you' is missing at the end – Vega Jun 7 at 15:24
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Please don't remove potentially spam links.

With the links removed other users will have hunt through the revision history to find out why someone else (or several someone elses) flagged the post as spam. It all adds to the time it takes to process the flag, remove the spam and deal with the user.

If the rest of post reads like it might be answer - most probably because it was copied from somewhere else - then it might actually get upvotes thus allowing the spammer to post more spam.

If you don't think the post is spam just leave it alone for other users to deal with.

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    While this is indeed good advice, it doesn't seem to really answer the core concern here either– it just kicks borderline posts down the road to the next person. How should we move forward with borderline posts that appear salvageable to some, and not to others? Is the best option to always spam flag, and let moderators handle those borderline cases? Or should we just decide on a case-by-case basis, and handle the mistakes as they occur? – zcoop98 Jun 2 at 19:57
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    @zcoop98 Most of the time these things are spam and get flagged as such either by enough regular users to be deleted straight away. I'd say that we mods see a higher proportion of borderline cases as they gather spam flags at a slow enough rate to hit our review queues. Mistakes will occur, but I see no evidence of them being widespread. – ChrisF Mod Jun 2 at 20:38
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    For those who may not know: once a post accumulates six "Spam" or "Rude or abusive" flags, it's immediately deleted. – Ryan M Jun 2 at 23:51
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    I think common sense should apply here. If the target of the link does not specifically relate to the answer, it should be deleted. If the target is providing general background to the provided answer, perhaps the text around the link needs to be edited to reflect the actual relationship so readers can make an informed decision as to whether they want to follow the link. – Patanjali Jun 3 at 15:08

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