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New users with less than 50 reputation cannot post comments, other than on their own posts and/or answers to questions they ask. But, they can delete their own answered questions. IMO, users who have a low reputation should not be permitted to delete their own question once it's answered, regardless of if the answer has an upvote yet, or not. People put a lot of effort, spending their free time helping the asker, but the asker simply deletes the answered question, showing no respect to people who help them.

I noticed that users having more reputation almost never do it (as they had to earn this reputation by helping other people and they understand how bad it is).

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    Moral of the story: pick and choose carefully which questions to spend time on and to answer – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 at 21:40
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    Also they can only delete the question while they have only one answer with no upvotes. – jonrsharpe May 22 at 21:45
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    @HovercraftFullOfEels good idea. I will not answer new users questions anymore. – 0___________ May 22 at 21:56
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    @0___________: your choice, of course. Myself, I do answer new users' questions if they appear to be well-thought and well-constructed. The people who put in the effort to do this, usually appreciate an answer and the site and become good future site citizens. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 at 21:59
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    Moderators will, generally, undelete answered questions, if the answerer, or someone else, raises an "in need of moderator intervention" flag asking for the question to be undeleted. – Makyen May 22 at 22:01
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    One thing you can do at present is, if you see someone get an answer then self-delete, mod-flag it. Mods are often willing to restore a question if they see that the delete has removed valuable work from an answerer. – halfer May 22 at 22:01
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    @Makyen IMO as more question you answer as more careful you are. Reputation reflects it. If users delete their own question they also delete the answers. If new users have this right they should also have the right to delete answers in their own questions. It is exactly the same. – 0___________ May 22 at 22:06
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    BTW very often I see: 1. Question asked, 2. Question answered, 3. OP does like the answer 4. OP deletes question 5. OP asks the same question again. Nonsense – 0___________ May 22 at 22:08
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    Then it sounds like you should be raising flags fairly often. Repeatedly asking the same question is not permitted. Moderators even have a stock message to send to users who have had their question flagged due to the user repeatedly asking the same question. OTOH, deletion of a question with a single non-deleted answer is permitted by the system when there are no upvotes on the answer. Having at least an upvote on the answer indicates to the system that the answer may have value to future visitors, but the system isn't perfect. Humans sometimes need to make that decision (both directions). – Makyen May 22 at 23:41
  • If this is implemented, it would also cut down on the "why have I been question banned" posts since deleting questions with answers is a big contributor to that. – dbush May 23 at 1:30
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    One reason that OPs delete their question with a useful answer is that they are cheating on their homework, and they are trying to get rid of the evidence. We definitely don't want to encourage that behaviour, so mods (& users with the delete vote privilege) are generally happy to undelete such questions. OTOH, it's a good idea to avoid providing complete working code solutions to questions that "smell" like homework. At least, don't give the OP something they can just cut & paste and hand in, pretending that it's their own work. – PM 2Ring May 23 at 3:30
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    This is a tricky one. On one hand, you're right; this is very annoying when it happens for no apparent/good reason. But on the other hand, some users will answer any questions; good or bad. Preventing a user from deleting their own (terrible) question only causes it to attract more and more downvotes until it gets deleted by other means. From the viewpoint of a new user (who might not be familiar with the rules yet), this is not fair for them. Deleting an unsalvagable question at a -1 or -2 score is probably better than having it deleted at a -9 score. – 41686d6564 May 23 at 6:39
  • Additionally, if the question is actually on-topic, the user deletes it after you answer it, and then you mod-flag it, I believe moderators undelete that kind of questions almost every time. – 41686d6564 May 23 at 6:41
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Be pickier with answering questions. Questions that are well thought out, of higher quality the asker is usually more invested on those, so unlikely to be deleted. That obviously means answering less, since the 90% rule rules over this. That way you reduce your probability of being a victim of this behavior.

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    On the python tag this is not possible. Almost every question is low quality garbage, and the one question that's of good quality usually gets half-answered by someone with 30k , and the OP accepts their half answers and never checks back, leaving the rest of the people to despair. There's a reason I have 2k rep only. – 10 Rep May 23 at 1:09
  • That way you reduce your probability of being victim of this behavior. I know well that we must answer good-questions only but If there is some-sense while deleting questions will be great. – Kevin M. Mansour May 23 at 1:43
  • @KevinM.Mansour well, read this other discussion and see the responses to that. – Braiam May 23 at 10:51
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You must answer only good questions which are not opinion-based, seeking recommendations, extremely low quality, not reproducible or caused by a typo (which means it won't help future readers), duplicate, or need more focus. So just be a little picky and answer questions which are well detailed, have debugging details (if needed), focus on one problem only, and are not duplicates.

But personally I support your request, because most new users delete questions for various reasons and sometimes for unknown reasons.

I noticed that users having more reputation almost never do it (as they had to earn this reputation by helping other people and they understand how bad it is).

Yes, I agree with you. When people spend time and effort in writing a good post, they understand that other people have spent time and effort into writing a good post. And as I am a Stack Overflow User, I understand how bad it feels to have your answer be deleted just because the OP clicked the "delete" button. I know well that I must answer only good questions but if there are some restrictions while deleting questions that will be great.

Notice: Your answer won't be deleted if you have 1 upvote or your answer is accepted as @Makyen ♦ said in comments.

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I see folks focusing primarily on the question aspect, but I would like to linger a moment and discuss the answer aspect.

Currently, the system won't allow any user (new or old) to delete their question so long as there is a positively scored answer on that question (or more than one answer). The answer being 0-score or less indicates that either (a) the asker operates quickly in bad-faith and not enough people viewed the answer to judge it, or (b) the person answering provided a less-than stellar answer.

So I think some sort of delay is in order from the moment a question is answered until it is possible to delete it. This should provide some protection to people who work hard to provide generally good answers. Gives it enough time to get enough attention and be voted upon as it deserves. This will alleviate option (a)

But if one falls victim to this abuse by askers often, I can't help but wonder if there is really something to save here by reverting the deletion? Option (b) seems far more likely when this happens often. In which case I would encourage answerers to do some reflection. Providing low-effort junk answers to junk questions helps no one. And preventing deletion of said junk will make SO worse overall, not better.

So I'll echo other people by saying we should choose what we answer more carefully, and add that we should treat our answers more seriously when we do post them.

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