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I started using Stack Overflow not so long ago and I'm a little lazy to read all the rules. Will it make my life and other users' lives better if I read that stuff?

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    Yes. They are there for a reason...
    – Tomerikoo
    May 18 at 7:45
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    The idea that one should read and study the whole Help Center before you interact in any way with the site is unrealistic and not productive. In my experience, it's generally enough to read the relevant rules, articles and guidance as you go along and as soon as you encounter "friction points" where reality defies your expectations.
    – yivi
    May 18 at 8:16
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    I suggest that you do take the tour as you haven't; that gives you a good introduction. As for the rest, if you are linked to a specific help center article (perhaps when you ask a question, or it's closed), or FAQ then I would suggest reading them at the latest then; people link you to them for good reason as normally your question is lacking the quality or focus for the site and people are directing you on how to make it meet the guidelines.
    – Larnu
    May 18 at 8:22
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    I'd also at a minimum recommend you read stackoverflow.com/help/dont-ask
    – Nick
    May 18 at 8:27
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    I wouldn't really say that the question answers what the OP is asking here, @gnat . That answers how much effort the OP should put in to solving their own problem before asking a question, not how much effort they should put into reading the help center before using the site.
    – Larnu
    May 18 at 8:54
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    This is one of those questions where if have to ask it, then the answer is "yes".
    – VLAZ
    May 18 at 9:15
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    Guessing the situation, you might at least need to read this particular article from the help center.
    – Andrew T.
    May 18 at 9:38
  • i believe alomst nobody has read them. so be like you are around nice people and do like the romans do
    – nbk
    May 18 at 10:43
  • "Is it necessary to read all the rules in Stack Overflow?" If it was necessary then you would need to submit a notarized signature before creating an account. Yes, they exist. Yes, it would be wise to read them. No, your success isn't guaranteed by reading them. I participated on this site for years before ever looking at the rules. The only reason I read them is because I made my way over to meta where discussions about how new users are ruining the site are prevalent.
    – MonkeyZeus
    May 19 at 13:55
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I'm a little lazy to read all the rules.

We have two features to counter your laziness: Closing and Downvoting.

Will it make my life and other users' lives better if I read that stuff?

It depends. By not reading all that stuff, you keep room in your brain for enjoying Cat videos. If you hoped for participating on these sites for more than 6 to 8 weeks, you better spend time familiarizing yourself with what is expected when building a canonical knowledgebase for generations of developers to come.

We're happy to use our close votes and downvotes on lazy content. Do accept that this might bring you closer to a quality ban which basically locks you out from posting questions or answers when you want.

I suggest going over the help articles (notice the pinned topics if you're in a hurry) as well as our or even the FAQ on the uber-meta. Also, take the tour.

Do study the tags https://meta.stackoverflow.com/tags and their tag wikis.

I admit Stack Overflow with its Q/A model is different from regular forums. Our sites are strictly moderated for quality. That comes at the price that onboarding / getting started has a bit of a steep learning curve.

Not everything goes here (outsiders like to call that toxic but you better not make that association in front of us). We're sorry for that and we do everything we can to provide info and guidance up-front, while you're asking a question and once you posted content.

Ultimately, there is Meta where we're happy to help in coaching / guiding on the effective use of the site and get the best help from the community. That asks for time investment from all parties involved. With an open mind and eagerness to learn, there is a lot on offer.

I've started with my part (as did others in the comments). Now it is your turn.

Happy to help.

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Just as one does not have to read the whole criminal code to behave properly in society, it is not necessary to read all the rules in this platform — and to be fair there is not a page clearly labeled "Here be the Rules", which are rather spread around the help center. There is a minimum you need to do, however.

  1. Search and research before asking. If you can't find a solution,

  2. Find out if your question is on-topic. If it is,

  3. Ask. Present your attempts. We are fed up with lazy, do-my-work-for-free questions. Don't let laziness leak into this step or don't complain when the question has been downvoted into oblivion and closed. Include a minimal example whenever applicable. Help us help you, we cannot see your data, error codes, failed attempts etc. if you don't show us.

If one is reasonable enough in asking for help in life, he may really only need to get to know step 2. It is a matter of politeness that if seeking volunteered help, you should show that you've put your efforts in the first place. If you want someone to do your work, hire someone.

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