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This is not a duplicate of the FAQ. Do not flag it as a duplicate of the FAQ. It is a response to and rebuttal of the FAQ.

SO should augment downvotes with an optional specific actionable feedback to the question or answer author**, like the ones at https://idownvotedbecau.se/

The list of reasons on idownvotedbecau.se, created specifically for Stack Overflow is:

Being unresponsive
Image of an exception
Images of code
It's not working
No attempt
No code
No debugging
Missing exception details
No MCVE
No research
Too much code
Too much information
Unclear what you're asking
Unreadable code
Wrong language

This list is far from definitive or final, and up for debate.

Each of these reasons links to a long-form post (example) that explains in detail what it means and what you can do about it. I propose adopting this format (if not this exact list of reasons).

I'm going to take a multiselect (not a dropdown) that users are encouraged to select at least one option from when downvoting as a proposed solution, and refute the arguments against it in the FAQ point-by-point.

I whipped up an example of what it could look like:

Sample implementation


Below, a response and attempted rebuttal to the points made in the canonical FAQ about the subject.

Downvotes are, first and foremost, a content rating system.

They are an overly simplistic rating system. Requiring a specific rating (unclear, incomplete, off-topic, etc.) would improve the quality of the rating system. A simple linear scale is not a good fit for "question quality" or "answer quality", when there are so many different ways a question can be "good" or "bad". A question might be outstandingly good in one way (thorough, well-written) and catastrophically bad in another (provides harmful advice and false information). A simple good/bad rating does not capture that.

In the vast majority of cases, nothing needs to be clarified. The tooltip on the downvote arrow already explains what a downvote means, and it is specific for questions and answers. In most cases, the "comment" in the tooltip already adequately explains the logic behind the downvote, so an additional comment would just be wasted effort and noise.

This entire paragraph is false. "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful" does not explain what a downvote means, and is not specific, because it gives three possible explanations and does not specify which (if any) apply. "This answer is not useful" is again completely nonspecific. Neither message "adequately explains the logic behind the downvote", because neither message adequately explains what is wrong with the question or answer.

Any requirement could be trivially circumvented by entering gibberish or something nonconstructive like "this is bad". Detecting and stopping those who enter such stuff through moderation/administrative action is simply not feasible on a site with millions of users.

At worst, a user could pick an irrelevant reason. However, in that case, the author of the question/answer would be able to figure out that the feedback is irrelevant (and potentially challenge it). A downvote without explanation provides no information and cannot be challenged.

It may not feel that way to you at the moment, but downvoters are doing the site a service, and making voting more difficult would impede the site's most important quality-control tool. Voting is ad-hoc and frictionless by design! Voting separates good content from bad, and makes the good content more visible. This is essential for the platform to work, even if it sometimes feels mean. If a vote is in error—which can always happen—the expectation is that the "swarm intelligence" of future viewers will eventually correct the problem. A single vote is nothing, really. What matters is the sum of all votes, which is why we only display the aggregate score.

Selecting a reason is a trivial amount of friction. Actionable feedback also separates good content from bad, and helps authors create better content. The expectation that "the 'swarm intelligence' of future viewers will eventually correct the problem" may be correct on average but that doesn't help individual authors that get downvotes with no actionable feedback. Some of them will improve enough to become part of that "swarm intelligence" if given the chance. If simply rejected outright, they will most likely leave.

Scale. Stack Overflow gets some 12,000+ questions every day. Many of them are of poor quality or just not a good fit for the site. It is beyond human capability to respond to each one of those bad or misplaced questions with custom-tailored advice. It would drain too much time and energy from the unpaid volunteers who answer questions and help users.

Adding one additional click (or keyboard shortcut) on a multi-select when downvoting is not arduous. Each reason would have a link to a more detailed explanation of the reason in the help center, which would have the beneficial effect of directing the author of the question or answer to relevant information without the person rating the post having to write "custom-tailored advice".

If downvoting is made more difficult, then upvoting would need to be made correspondingly more difficult. The system uses downvotes and upvotes to filter out the "good" content from the "bad." If consequence-free downvoting is a problem, then, logically, consequence-free upvoting is, too, because it potentially marks low-quality content as "good".

Downvoting already carries a reputation penalty, but upvoting doesn't. "Consequence-free upvoting" without "consequence-free downvoting" is the status quo, which the FAQ is supposedly defending. Regardless, I have no objection to requiring upvotes to select reason(s) as well (well-written, comprehensive, shows research effort, contains minimal complete reproducible example, contains exactly what I needed to solve my problem, insightful, etc.), since that could provide authors with useful feedback about why and how their questions and answers are considered valuable by the community.

Documentation on how to ask a good question is made easily available for those willing to read it. Stack Overflow's rules are special and arcane, but it's not like there hasn't been a lot written on the topic; even our #1 user, Jon Skeet has written explanations on how to ask a good question. Similarly, we provide extensive guidance on how to answer questions.

True, but not relevant, because none of that provides an explanation as to why a particular question or answer was downvoted. What is a user who has read the documentation, but still gets downvoted without explanation to do?

Leaving a comment accompanying a downvote can lead to negative consequences, like revenge downvoting and even off-site harassment.

Ratings, like votes, would still be anonymous.

Stack Overflow (the community, and the company) is actually doing a hell of a lot to make the place feel more friendly. The past few years have seen tons of discussions, initiatives, UI changes, help center updates and renovations, experiments like mentoring, and more—all aimed at making starting out at Stack Overflow a more pleasant experience without compromising on quality. Actually, a lot of veteran users feel that the sites' owners are putting too much emphasis on making the site feel nice, for the sake of traffic (which translates into money) over quality. Regardless of whether they're right or not, it is not accurate to say nothing is being done. It's just a really tough problem.

True, but not relevant. Saying a lot has been done is far from a reason to stop making improvements.

We can't accommodate everyone. There will always be more question-askers out there than there are competent answerers. You can't overburden the latter by allowing a huge quantity of bad or badly-fitting questions into the system—you'd destroy the entire system, and hence prevent any questions from getting answered. Not getting to ask your question on SO isn't a death sentence; many SO veterans have questions every day that they don't pose on Stack Overflow because they know they wouldn't be a good fit under the current model. The resources those veterans turn to to solve their problems are usually open to everyone on the Internet - they just take time, effort, and sometimes periods of frustration to understand. There are also other, more mentoring-oriented resources to turn to.

It is true no site can accommodate everyone. That doesn't mean you shouldn't try to make improvements to accommodate people better. Requiring slightly more granular feedback is not going to "destroy the entire system". https://www.thoughtco.com/slippery-slope-logical-fallacy-1692105

Using the heavy load on moderators and high-rep users due to SO's inadequate moderation tools and feedback systems to justify not improving SO's moderation tools and feedback systems is counterproductive.

Note: This question was incorrectly flagged as a duplicate of the FAQ. It is not a duplicate, but a response to the assertions in the FAQ. Creating a new question is the only way to respond to a FAQ.

2nd Note: It appears there is a similar feature request, Up and down vote tags (reason categories) for the OP to improve their post which the author of this feature request was not aware of at the time, did not get much attention when it was originally posted, and this feature request might be a duplicate of.

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  • 8
    "Downvoting already carries a reputation penalty, but upvoting doesn't". Only for answers.
    – yivi
    May 17 at 15:49
  • 4
    A dropdown containing all possible reasons I might downvote something is far from feasible.
    – Erik A
    May 17 at 15:50
  • 3
    You're also omitting one very important aspect of this feature request: How is this feadback going to be shown on the downvoted post?
    – Cerbrus
    May 17 at 15:52
  • 4
    No. Disliking a post shouldn't be any harder than liking it. Rating content should be as straightforward as possible. Besides, we need way more downvotes on SO, I think what you propose here is not only nonsensical, but harmful too. May 17 at 16:01
  • 2
    Well, for one, this question at least quotes from the canonical "mandatory feedback with downvote" FAQ. On the other hand, it just chooses to disregard most of the points as if they didn't matter. It also seems to assume that selecting from a fixed list of reasons, which by the way were not defined in this proposal, will satisfy those who receive downvotes. I've seen enough complaints to know that it won't. May 17 at 16:04
  • 2
    As the specific list of reasons was now edited in, it's safe to say that most of us will disagree with it. The list is at least missing "not useful"; and some of those specified are either redundant or already exist as reasons to close. May 17 at 16:13
  • 7
    Downvoting is not a feedback mechanism for the OP. Downvotes are a signal for future visitors that the content is not useful. As such it can not be replaced. Those that want to comment on posts that can use a bit of extra care probably use the auto-comments plugin
    – rene
    May 17 at 16:14
  • 2
    Let's assume for a moment that we run an experiment (much like we did with reactions) where this feature gets implemented. The outcome of the experiment is that the number of downvotes cast significantly goes down. Do you call the experiment an success? Isn't this whole FR driven by the motivation to get rid of downvotes? If it is not, explain why not.
    – rene
    May 17 at 16:37
  • 3
    "Voters have no mechanism to give anonymous, constructive negative feedback." - Of course we do, votes. And votes aren't primarily intended as feedback for authors, so your second point in that comment is moot.
    – Nick
    May 17 at 16:40
  • 6
    Why on earth does SO need to change their downvoting practice for a single downvote on your AskUbuntu post. Go post on their meta.
    – rene
    May 17 at 16:50
  • 3
    @ClementCherlin If you want a different response you're going to have to ask a different question, votes are constructive for that reason, it doesn't matter if you want votes to come with some form of useful feedback that the OP can actually action in order to improve it. That's not their purpose.
    – Nick
    May 17 at 16:55
  • 4
    @ClementCherlin Please stop arguing that votes aren't constructive just because they don't do what you want them to do :facepalm:
    – Nick
    May 17 at 16:58
  • 5
    The tooltip has all the feedback you need.
    – rene
    May 17 at 17:12
  • 3
    I think the most useful thing that would come out of this would be some metrics on how few people actually edit their post in a meaningful way after receiving comments (or closures). In my experience <10% probably <5%.
    – Warcupine
    May 17 at 17:14
  • 5
    I like the idea of being able to give anonymous feedback along with (or orthogonal to) a downvote. As long as it were optional and did not make downvoting any more difficult or awkward. One of the main reasons not to tell people what's wrong with their post is that you're putting yourself on the hook to be blamed for downvotes.
    – khelwood
    May 20 at 18:29
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I strongly believe that it would not be beneficial to the platform in the long run. In short, this falls into wanting more than voting was designed to do, introducing an anonymous feedback mechanism which does not encourage voting (potentially the opposite), makes a tighter link between feedbacks and downvotes, and without fixing the core problem of people taking downvotes personally. All of this under a principle that not everyone agrees with: that you should explain your downvotes (you should not).

I will quote some of the takes in the question, not with the intent to exhaustively counter-argue every statement made, but to clarify my stance described above.

The list of reasons on idownvotedbecau.se, created specifically for Stack Overflow is:

Being unresponsive
Image of an exception
Images of code
It's not working
No attempt
No code
No debugging
Missing exception details
No MCVE
No research
Too much code
Too much information
Unclear what you're asking
Unreadable code
Wrong language

We are unlikely to be in full agreement with that list. Even after a good deal of discussion, finding a list of reasons that every stakeholder would say "OK, let's go with that" would not be so easy. For starters, "not useful" is one of the key reasons presented in the downvote button's tooltip, and yet is not on that list. Some other reasons seem either the kind of feedback that is:

  • Very likely provided in comments already when applicable (Wrong language);
  • Incorrectly suggesting a hard rule to downvote (No code);
  • Not even based on the content of the post (Being unresponsive);
  • Already provided anyway, once the question is closed (Unclear what you're asking, No MCVE);
  • Possibly not different enough to justify a separate item (Image of an exception vs Image of code; No attempt vs No research, No code vs No MCVE vs Too much code).

Not to mention that idownvotedbecau.se is not an official resource and is not even that well endorsed here. Comments linking the site are known to disappear quickly, in spite of the useful information within.

They are an overly simplistic rating system. Requiring a specific rating (unclear, incomplete, off-topic, etc.) would improve the quality of the rating system. A simple linear scale is not a good fit for "question quality" or "answer quality", when there are so many different ways a question can be "good" or "bad".

A linear scale is eventually required for knowing how to sort answers by vote, and when to hide questions. The part where it improves the quality of the rating system is subjective.

This entire paragraph is false. "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful" does not explain what a downvote means, and is not specific, because it gives three possible explanations and does not specify which (if any) apply. "This answer is not useful" is again completely nonspecific. Neither message "adequately explains the logic behind the downvote", because neither message adequately explains what is wrong with the question or answer.

A downvote is not meant to convey a specific explanation. In fact, as already mentioned, "not being useful" is indeed a reason to downvote, even when it is not necessarily actionable. If this option is not listed, then you are basically passing a different, incomplete idea for when to vote down. If it is listed and people use it, the authors will still be upset anyway, at the risk of perceiving this option as an insult to injury if they take it personally. This last matter is an education problem, not solved by any kind of feedback mechanism.

At worst, a user could pick an irrelevant reason. However, in that case, the author of the question/answer would be able to figure out that the feedback is irrelevant (and potentially challenge it). A downvote without explanation provides no information and cannot be challenged.

There is a very serious problems with this argument. Downvotes are not meant to be challenged. If a user legitimately found the post worthy of a downvote, then no justification is in order. The only exception comes from fraudulent voting, which is only rarely the case, and in that case you should reach out to a moderator via flags, not to the voter. If an author of a post sees the downvote, or any other feedback, as not applicable, they can just shrug it off (see Tim losing his keys). Even this assessment of whether feedback is irrelevant is not always best done by the author of a post, but this is only a matter of assuming good will first. Is someone suggesting that the question not have an MRE? Inspect the question for what you may have missed. Mistakes can happen sure, but so many times we witness askers insisting that their question is fine, to the point that they refuse to incorporate suggestions clearly given in text. It would not have been very different from comments in this regard.

Selecting a reason is a trivial amount of friction. Actionable feedback also separates good content from bad, and helps authors create better content. The expectation that "the 'swarm intelligence' of future viewers will eventually correct the problem" may be correct on average but that doesn't help individual authors that get downvotes with no actionable feedback. Some of them will improve enough to become part of that "swarm intelligence" if given the chance. If simply rejected outright, they will most likely leave.

Again, downvotes are not designed as feedback to the author. The idea of correlating a downvote with a set of reasons from a multi-list is... pretty much an attempt to make it a feedback mechanism, in a platform where the last thing people should be doing is to argue about whether a downvote is warranted or not. The rest is just "the OP wants feedback", which unfortunately is not always true, as already hinted in the FAQ.

Downvoting already carries a reputation penalty, but upvoting doesn't. "Consequence-free upvoting" without "consequence-free downvoting" is the status quo, which the FAQ is supposedly defending. [...]

Hold up. Voting has been deliberately designed to be frictionless, be it up or down. The penalty for casting a downvote on answers (previously on any kind of post) only existed as an attempt to prevent abuse. Eventually, as the site realized that we should be optimizing for perls rather than sand, the penalty was removed for downvoting questions. This penalty has also been recently indicated as one of the things discouraging downvotes. Nowhere does the FAQ defend this penalty, or explicitly claim to defend the current state of things "just because".

What is a user who has read the documentation, but still gets downvoted without explanation to do?

Sounds almost like a rhetorical question to me. Just a user is the answer. That they may feel that they should have the right to an explanation is a problem of false expectations.

Ratings, like votes, would still be anonymous.

At least that, but it wouldn't prevent comments like "The blind downvoter who said there's no MCVE should have their eyes checked". Insults of this sort are found (and deleted) still fairly often, but they are still bad and cause harm to the already scarce curator base. This proposal would not change that unless people are properly educated to stop taking downvotes so personally, and stop trying to find or extrapolate who downvoted. Or again, trying to challenge downvotes. This feature would emphasize the correlation of downvotes with feedback, thus being counterproductive to this goal.

The only way to prevent this is to enable this form of feedback without having to vote, but that in turn would be paradoxal, because selecting these options would suppose that it makes sense to downvote the post. There would be a risk of people doing one and not the other, thus not downvoting where it's due. It would at least make an interesting research topic to know how often this would happen. Hopefully without much head rolling in the process. At best, give multi-select-like feedback with no voting required a trial for a month, and let SO withdraw some conclusions from there.


An experiment was made specifically for providing private feedback to articles, not very different from what was proposed here. Other than the reasons already stated above, there are many more for the poor reception of this mechanism:

  • It annoyingly pops up when voting down (again, heavily correlating votes with feedback).
  • The feedback is private, meaning that only the author of the article gets to see it. At least with comments one can see when the same reason has already been given.
  • Even though the feedback itself is private, it does not make the user anonymous to the author.
  • It follows a weird assumption that feedback provisioning mechanisms are more relevant in articles rather than Q&A.

See also:

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