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Motivation:

  1. Swift 5.4 was recently released.
  2. , , and are all synonyms of
  3. can be created and become a tag synonym of as well.

However, I wish I was able to see questions specifically about Swift 5.4.


Tag info for :

Use this tag only for questions directly related to changes in version 5 of Apple's Swift programming language.

Q: I am confused about this phrase: "directly related to changes in version 5"
Does this encapsulate dot releases? (major dot releases?)

If not, I propose to remove the synonyms for , , , and to also create tags for and .

(Examples of tags for dot releases: Swift 4.1, Swift4.2, Swift3.2)

The problem is that these tags are not following a system.


Great Resources (but none of these have accepted answers):

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  • 1
    The tags are following a system (namely, keep the major version tag and synonymize minor versions to it). You may not agree with that system, and it may not be followed consistently for older versions, but there is a system. We don't create tags without questions to apply them to. If there are questions about specific changes made in Swift 5.0 or 5.4, your best bet is to list them here as evidence. May 6 at 15:50
  • @HereticMonkey That makes sense, thank you. Yes, I agree that the tags should stay a synonym. (If all the tags were split up by minor releases, someone would have to filter every question and categorize which release it belongs to – not exactly useful.) If this question is useful, I can accept an answer (or self answer) so as to prevent future duplicates.
    – 0-1
    May 6 at 16:13
  • 2
    Oh, I'd wait for others to pipe up. I am by no means a Swift expert (I can barely spell it :)), so it would probably be good to get some of those experts to weigh in. Meta questions tend to take a little longer to "germinate" than those on the main site; it might be a few days. May 6 at 16:18
  • @HereticMonkey sounds good.
    – 0-1
    May 6 at 16:18
  • 2
    As someone frequenting the python tag, I'm very confused these aren't unique tags – all of python, python3, python-3.9 (and so on) are separate. Why have all these tags otherwise? May 6 at 17:13
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    @Braiam I am sure that statement makes sense to someone who already knows the answer to my question. I don't, so can you please clarify how unique tags are not useful but just vacuous categories? Or perhaps the inverse – how all these synonyms are useful? May 6 at 17:53
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    I'm sure there are some beneficial uses of the Python version-specific tags (somewhere), but virtually every time I see a use of one, it really ought to just use the python tag. Even if the question really is version-specific, that doesn't necessarily mean it has to have a tag to say so.
    – khelwood
    May 6 at 17:56
  • @khelwood I understand "version specific tags shouldn't exist", e.g. because people don't use them properly. I don't understand "version specific tags should exist as synonyms". May 6 at 18:04
  • 1
    Is there preferable way to prevent or get rid of them other than by synonymising them?
    – khelwood
    May 6 at 18:07
  • 3
  • 4
    @wjandrea I'm sure there are. I'm just not sure that they need version specific tags.
    – khelwood
    May 6 at 21:24
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    @wjandrea A question can easily indicate that it's asking about some specific version (or versions) in the title (and some of your examples did). Having a tag indicating the version adds nothing to the question's quality. Your walrus operator question actually exemplifies this fact. General questions about the operator are going to have applicability to any following Python version for decades to come, even into Python 4 and beyond; it is actually not specific to Python 3.8. The vast majority of "version specific" questions are going to be like that: some version and beyond.
    – jpmc26
    May 7 at 20:09
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    I think whether or not the major version should encapsulate minor versions depends on whether the software follows semantic versioning or not. If it does then swift5 should encapsulate 5.1, 5.2 ... etc but if it doesn't then it shouldn't. The idea with semantic versioning is that everyone can just upgrade to the latest minor release without issues so the assumption is that everyone does.
    – apokryfos
    May 8 at 7:40
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    @apokryfos but is that relevant to us? Are 1.2.3 and 1.2.4 so alien that no knowledge is applicable for both?
    – Braiam
    May 8 at 15:21
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    @apokryfos You should address first why should we have version tags. Otherwise, you will be putting the cart before the horse.
    – Braiam
    May 10 at 13:53
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Tags do not exist for finding existing questions that already have answers. Search engines do a vastly better job of that. Tags exist for users creating or answering questions to filter by expertise. They allow experts to indicate what technologies and subjects they can provide answers for (so they can be shown questions relevant to their expertise), and they allow askers to indicate what sorts of expertise they believe is needed to answer their question. (Other users can edit tags if they believe a specific expertise the asker wasn't aware of is called for.)

As a result, it makes virtually no sense to even have version specific tags. An expert in Swift is going to have expertise across multiple versions; no one is going to have expertise in a single minor (or even major) version. While not all Swift experts can necessarily answer questions about the behaviors of specific versions, most of those questions are going to require expertise across multiple versions anyway (to be able to point out how something changed at a bare minimum).

While this is not an official position as far as I'm aware, this is the practical reality. Yes, I realize that tags are not used exclusively in the manner I describe, but other usages are ineffective and create more problems than they solve.

I say this even as someone well versed in Python, where and are commonly used because of major compatibility problems between the two. The questions involving the practical differences between the two are best answered by someone with expertise in both, and those only targeting the newest version will need to be updated as the newest version evolves just as older questions now do.

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  • 17
    Disagree with the premise that tags are only used by those providing answers and they aren't valuable for site search
    – charlietfl
    May 6 at 23:56
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    @MisterMiyagi "since they are effectively distinct languages" No, they really are not. There are a few incompatibilities in some of the basic features that you use every day is all. Granted that's high impact, but it's hardly "effectively distinct languages."
    – jpmc26
    May 7 at 6:34
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    @charlietfl Explain to me what's going to happen to all the questions tagged swift5 when swift6 comes out. Is someone going to go through and hand apply the new tag to all the questions that are relevant because the feature did not change in version 6? How are you going to know which version something changed in 5 years from now so you can search for the right one? Tags are a good way to indicate relevant subject matter (and the associated expertise), not version applicability.
    – jpmc26
    May 7 at 6:45
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    @MisterMiyagi "Are you saying it makes no sense to have version specific tags, or it makes no sense having version specific aliases, or both?" Sorry. I forgot to answer this. I am saying having version numbers in tags makes no sense and creates problems and provides an effective solution for nothing.
    – jpmc26
    May 7 at 6:50
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    I wasn't trying to litigate the nuances of version specific tags but rather take exception to the asserted generalization of what tags are for. Perhaps you don't use them for search but many many people do
    – charlietfl
    May 7 at 12:33
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    Quote from the tag page “A tag is a keyword or label that categorizes your question with other, similar questions. Using the right tags makes it easier for others to find and answer your question.”
    – 0-1
    May 7 at 14:49
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    @charlietfl: If you want your question answered, you better use a tag that is followed by people who can answer your question. If you tag with "swift5.3.2.4", good chances are nobody is following that tag. When I want to answer a Python question, I list questions tagged "python", so it's in your advantage to use the "python" tag rather than the "python3" tag. May 7 at 15:37
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    @charlietfl I'm not making an argument about how people use them. Lots of features are misused for problems they're bad at solving. I'm making an argument about what problems tags are an effective solution for and what our norms should be going forward.
    – jpmc26
    May 7 at 18:37
  • @CrisLuengo I follow the swift* wildcard tag for that purpose.
    – 0-1
    May 7 at 22:29
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    @0-1 I think the fact you followed a wildcard to catch all the versions kind of demonstrates my point. It also begs questions about the language specific library tags like swiftmailer or python-datetime, but third party library tags would seem to be more useful than version ones, in my estimation.
    – jpmc26
    May 7 at 22:43

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