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Would anyone be willing to take a look at my closed question here and vote for/against reopening? It has 2/3 reopen votes as of this writing.

The main reason is that mklement0 went and did some tricky research that solidly answers the question and is currently sitting in a comment/gist. I'd love them to get the points for it because I've tried it, it works, and it's a really neat answer to a tricky problem.

FWIW, I believe the closing as a "library recommendation question" was incorrect and was done because it's a tricky edge case and no clear answer was apparent to me when I posted, which left the question a little vague. Since then, I've added a couple of definite lines of inquiry to the question, and I think it is reopen-worthy, especially with a solid answer.

I feel like posting here is a big hammer for a small problem, so let me know if there was a better way I could have handled this.

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    I've cast the last needed re-open vote. I must say though, that your guesses for the reason of the close-votes are probably incorrect. "tricky edge case and no clear answer" isn't a valid reason to close a question. I suspect that paragraph is getting this question some downvotes. – Cerbrus Apr 26 at 7:48
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    Well, I believe it was actually closed for those reasons, which are, as you say, invalid. I think people didn't like the vagueness and shoved it into the "library recommendation" box, which it didn't belong in. But of course I don't really know. That was just my intuition. – xdhmoore Apr 26 at 7:49
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    Upvoted just to contest the awkward politics of SO – Lore Apr 26 at 14:56
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    I would have voted to close, as this is basically a code request. There's no attempt made to solve the problem here, just "I have a vague idea but I don't understand how to do it" which is fine, but not a good question for SO. – miken32 Apr 26 at 16:41
  • And it's getting close votes already. – Joshua Apr 26 at 16:42
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    OMG I just looked at the original rev of the question that got it closed. 4 sentences, one of which is "Is this possible?" No code attempts? That's an absolutely unacceptable question and someone with 6k rep should know that. – miken32 Apr 26 at 16:44
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    "Needs details or clarity"... I guess the question could benefit from an illustration of what is meant by getting the text of the current line, but I don't see how it could get much clearer than that. – BoltClock Apr 26 at 17:07
  • I think the question not only was valid but it demonstrated AND documented some insight into the subject. I5 should have never be closed – Spyros K Apr 28 at 12:32
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Yeah, I don't really understand why your question, even in its original form, was closed as a tool recommendation question. Nowhere in your question are you explicitly asking for tool recommendations.

It's reopened now though, someone got to the last vote before I did. You mentioned this meta question being overkill — well, I as a moderator tend to use my binding reopen votes wherever I can because I find the question reopening process unnecessarily slow and laborious, especially for questions that never should've been closed in the first place.

For those wondering if a gist being an answer renders the question a tool recommendation question... it's a gist because the question is closed, not because it's the source code for an external tool (even then, as I said, the question never explicitly asked for tool recommendations in the first place, so never should've been closed). Had the question not been closed, the code would've been posted directly as an answer.

Not sure why the haikus were there, maybe you were just messing around while waiting for your question to be reopened, but they're no longer needed now so I've taken them out.

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    Hah! Ninja'd :D – Cerbrus Apr 26 at 7:49
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    @Cerbrus: You win this time... – BoltClock Apr 26 at 7:49
  • I'm sure they'll move it into an answer now that it's reopened. – xdhmoore Apr 26 at 7:50
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    Lol, yeah, the haikus--; Just there for my own venting; Thanks for the review! – xdhmoore Apr 26 at 7:55
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    @xdhmoore: They may actually discourage people from voting to reopen your question tbh, as they're bad edits that detract from your question. I wouldn't recommend doing that next time. – BoltClock Apr 26 at 7:57
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    @xdhmoore a haiku is nice / it can bring beauty and joy / but in a comment – VLAZ Apr 26 at 8:21
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    It was closed as a tool recommendation because there's not a close reason for "give me some code" questions. I often use that close reason for these kinds of questions, though I personally would have chosen "needs focus" for this one. – miken32 Apr 26 at 16:51
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    @miken32: The tool-recommendation close reason is misunderstood and misused enough as it is, and I hope you can refrain from using it for that purpose in future. I guess "needs more focus" would have made some more sense, but I actually think the question was plenty focused even in its original state, by saying "But to do this, the first step would be to get the text of the current line, before it is submitted (before ENTER is pressed)." The only thing missing is, as you've said, some starter code - but the whole point of the question is to ask how to even start. – BoltClock Apr 26 at 17:01
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    Gimme teh codez questions are always tricky, in particular because we don't always know in advance how trivial, or monumental, a task can be, and some questions are either deceptively simple or deceptively complicated. But the addition of the options availed to the asker since first asking certainly has helped narrow their question down. – BoltClock Apr 26 at 17:04
  • FWIW, my original intentions were more of a "Gimme teh function name or docs page link". – xdhmoore Apr 27 at 21:59
  • @xdhmoore: "docs page link" would be as close to a recommendation question as it gets, as links fall under that too. But you never explicitly asked for one. Asking for what function to use, on the other hand, is the entire point of SO. – BoltClock Apr 28 at 4:15
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    @miken32 FWIW, "no attempt"/"lack of research" is a downvote reason, not a close-vote reason. If the question is too broad or unclear, those close reasons exist. If it's in fact asking for a library, then the chosen reason would've been appropriate. Otherwise, if the question is on-topic, not opinion-based, and not a duplicate, it should not be closed; downvoted, maybe. Just my two cents. – 41686d6564 Apr 28 at 11:20
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Thanks to the literal hundreds of people who've looked at this question at this point. Just to communicate that I've been absorbing both the positive/negative feedback, Here's a somewhat contrived answer to myself:


Trying to figure out if a feature exists can indeed be a tricky research task, especially if the search space includes several tools. Also, getting excited about a new "crazy idea" is a great part of programming! But asking for help is also about good communication to the people helping. I think a couple things could've helped you communicate more clearly in your original question:

  • Question clarity - Regardless of your intentions, "Is this possible?" is not very clear to other users. Do you want a plain "Yes, this is possible. Have a nice day." as an answer? Do you want them to write some code for you? Are you looking for the name of an API function/hook that does what you want? A link to the doc page for such a piece of the API? Your question can be interpreted in different ways and, I believe, was.
  • Do effort - While you did some research after your question was closed, you posted your initial question after a quick google. Probably jumped the gun here. Your post-close research--digging around in the PSReadline docs and source code--did in fact back up your intuition: that there probably wasn't a clear existing hook for this. But it would have been good to have done this first. The SO community wants you to do this first.
  • Show effort - And as importantly, it could have helped to let people know you'd made some effort. Including in your answer "I spent some time reading the docs & digging around in the github source code for library X" helps people know that you're not just looking for a code handout. Making the effort, and then mentioning it in the question helps communicate that.
  • Professional language Using words like "crazy side project" in a post may give people a bad vibe. I don't love it, but it's the world, kid.

I've tweaked the SO question again slightly as a result as well.

I wonder if there had been a better close reason like "Doesn't show effort" if it would have helped me identify some of these things faster. I don't know if that would work well or not.

Finally, it is possible to be kind and polite while giving negative feedback. It takes more energy and intention, but it is possible.

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    Merely saying that you researched is not helpful. At least summarize where & what you searched for & address how it didn't help. "Doesn't show effort" is neither a close nor downvote reason. "Shows no research effort" is not a close reason but is a downvote reason; but the consequences of not researching can lead to a closeworthy post. – philipxy Apr 29 at 2:47
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Your question was originally, and correctly, closed because it showed zero research effort. Yes, I know that's not an official reason for closure, and no I don't care. Questions that lack research effort are implicitly of low quality, and as such are orthogonal to a high-quality Q&A site like this community aspires to make Stack Overflow into.

So, that closure is entirely your fault for writing such a poor question. Attempting to abrogate responsibility with snarky haikus that imply the opposite, is both rude and self-entitled. Take this as a learning opportunity to write well-researched questions, that won't get immediately closed, in future.

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    Thank you for using Microsoft Edge. – BoltClock Apr 28 at 11:31
  • Why do people not like this response? Literally such little effort the entire original post fits in a comment: ----" Getting powershell current line before ENTER is pressed I had a crazy side project idea to write a visualizer that displays an AST of your PowerShell line as you type it. But to do this, the first step would be to get the text of the current line, before it is submitted (before ENTER is pressed). Is this possible? I am using PowerShell Core 7.1.0 on the new Windows Terminal." – hythis Apr 28 at 17:47
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    Yes, I know that's not an official reason for closure, and no I don't care. --> Lack of effort is a downvote reason, not a reason for closure, unless said effort is absolutely required to answer a question. I don't see "lack of effort" on the list, therefore a post should not be closed because of that. Just because you don't care doesn't mean the post should stay closed... – 10 Rep Apr 28 at 21:30
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    I both upvoted this cause I think it's a good point, and flagged it cause I think the way it's worded is unnecessarily abrasive. But whether my question should have been downvoted vs closed isn't super interesting to me at this point either. – xdhmoore Apr 28 at 22:06
  • @10Rep The downvote tooltip says "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful". That semi-colon is like an and. So lack of research effort seems to not be quite enough ;) The post could be perfectly clear and very useful. – Scratte Apr 28 at 23:20
  • @Scratte I always thought a semicolon was just there to split a sentence in half :). On the other hand, yes, you are right, but downvoting is more free than closing. I could downvote a post for any reason I want as long as I am not targeting a user. So the folks who aren't fans of no research questions can downvote them and are within the rules to do so. – 10 Rep Apr 28 at 23:28
  • @10Rep Yes, but my point is that the "reason" isn't as per the tool-tip, if that is what one is going for with saying no effort is a downvote reason. One can downvote well researched, useful, clear and focused post too.. Or upvote rants on meta ;) – Scratte Apr 28 at 23:44

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