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Over the last few years I've been seeing more and more cases of users fishing for high rep by answering simple questions that are either duplicates or that the OP did not put any effort into researching how to solve the problem.

Since a lot of these questions are for very simple problems, they get a lot of traffic and a lot of votes. Some really simple things that are answered over and over had 100s and in some cases 1000s of votes up, this seems to encourage users to post low quality and duplicate questions and answers over and over to gain rep.

I would like to suggest a few possible solutions that may help (each by itself or all together):

These will probably hurt everyone's rep-points somewhat, but quality should matter more than your points do.

  1. Give a penalty for posting questions that are obvious duplicate (i.e. related question in list is voted as reason for duplication), this should not be returned on deletion of question. Why: encourage users to check for duplicates. How: save list of related at time of post, check if close vote includes a link from there.

  2. Give a penalty for answers to questions with no attempt in them by OP to solve alone, this should not be returned on deletion of answer. Why: discourage users from answering for rep without filtering for quality.

  3. Reduce rep gained from an answers to zero (if higher) if question is closed. Why: discourage users from answering for rep without filtering for quality.

  4. Award less rep to questions where OP did not link to related questions or documentation. Why: encourage users to post high quality questions.

  5. Award more rep to "hard" questions and answers than "easy" questions and answers e.g. in inverse to popularity of tags. E.g. a scale of rep between 2 and 20. Why: try to reduce rep mining on questions that can be answered easily by looking at the documentation and reward answers to complex problems. How: a. statistics algorithm like tf-idf, b. answer frequency, if multiple answers posted quickly, it's easy.

  6. Cap reputation at 20 per post. (Yes, even for my posts!) Why: popular questions aren't better, they are just for more used topics.

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    "Give a penalty for answer questions with no attempt in them by OP to solve alone" How would you propose to identify questions that both 1) need an attempt by the OP to be on-topic and 2) lack such an attempt? – Ryan M Apr 21 at 8:14
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    "Cap reputation at 20 per post" Why a cap? Why is an in-depth post that helps thousands of people worth as much as "btw foo is null"? Why would anyone bother writing the former instead of 100 of the latter? – Ryan M Apr 21 at 8:16
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    I was actually leaning towards upvoting this - until I reached the list.... I completely sympathize with your preface. I too get annoyed when I see poor questions or obvious duplicates being answered (even by high-rep users). But sorry to say this, none of your proposals make sense and implementing any of them will lead us to a dark place – Tomerikoo Apr 21 at 8:17
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    What is easy for one can be hard for someone else. How-To Questions are useful to a lot of users. I search for them when I need to do something. I've found that the less effort the asker put into the Question, the more useful the Answers are. Once the asker had made a failed attempt or listed all the things they tried, the Answers all focus of that very narrow thing. – Scratte Apr 21 at 8:23
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    I like the general idea of the post, I'm just not sure how we would implement it fully automated. How would we determine hard vs. easy question algorithmically? How would we determine obvious duplicates algorithmically? – BDL Apr 21 at 8:30
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    1. The reputation cap of 200 par day is already making users stop answering when they reach the cap. With this they'll put less effort into individual Answers. 2. People will start fighting about whether a duplicate is obvious or not. We're already divided on lots of other issues. 3. Almost every high-viewed high-scored post falls into that one. It will make users stop answering any new posts that may become future pearls. 4. More fighting going on. More close/reopen wars. This is not going to end well for anyone. – Scratte Apr 21 at 8:33
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    5. Question author doesn't know where to link, that is why they're asking. And how can anyone read their mind? Now the wars are going to be discussing what the question author may or may not already know. And only they will really know it. 6. Everything is easy once you know how to do it. What is easy for one person is hard for someone else. Again: More fighting going on. – Scratte Apr 21 at 8:33
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    @DannyVarod: The SO related algorithm is so bad that it usually doesn't even match the technology used (at least not in the tags I'm active in) – BDL Apr 21 at 8:34
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    @DannyVarod Among those top 3 Google result there will be at least 1 Stack Overflow post, because someone asked it and usually someone else answered it. Do you really want those to go away? – Scratte Apr 21 at 8:41
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    Hmm.. you changed the order of the list. My earlier comments refers to the list in revision 1 – Scratte Apr 21 at 8:44
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    "Personally, I think that voting this down without actually going through low quality posts (with high votes!) may indicate to how users voting here gained their rep." ⟵ The irony here is that you made my point for me. You seem to be assuming things here. You're basically telling us that the users that downvote your post don't know what they're doing - because they're ignorant :D Now.. we can fight about whether or not the meta crowd is ignorant :P – Scratte Apr 21 at 8:52
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    @DannyVarod The date that one created the account does not do the time that a user has spent on the site justice. Nor the moderation tasks. Sure, you've had your account here 10 years more than I have. But did you read all the meta posts that I did? It's hard to tell, no? Have you curated the site by a factor of 6 in comparison to my account? Seems not even close. Some have young accounts, but make more than up for that in the time they spent here since they created their account. Experience comes with the time spent on doing something, no? – Scratte Apr 21 at 9:46
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    @DannyVarod: Talking about missing experience is a mood point, especially when you only consider years that the account exists. Just for comparison: Scrattle has in the one year they are here made 5 times as many reviews as you did in your 10 years, they flagged 120 times more than you and have left more than two times as many votes as you did. You talk about knowledge of low-quality posts, but have never done a single review in any of the quality related queues (LQP, Late Answers, First posts). So where is your experience coming from? – BDL Apr 21 at 10:08
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    I hate when people answer low quality posts that have already been answered zillion times. But your proposed solutions bad and because of that I downvoted your proposal. I have been here for more than 6years and I have 24 Steward badges. I also voted to close more than 33.000 questions, most out of the queue so I don't have badges for those. I hope I am qualified enough to judge your request. The only thing we can do is close poor questions faster and SO could take some steps to ensure that people post less poor questions. – Dalija Prasnikar Apr 21 at 12:11
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    I didn't suggest alternatives because there are none. Besides voting to close. Yes, I know there is too many questions asked and we cannot close them all in time. But you cannot create automated system to fully automatically judge questions or answers, because otherwise we would not have that problem in the first place. Anyone posting poor question would not be able to post it, or it could be automatically closed. Adding another review queue on top of others would not solve actual problem - too many poor questions and not enough people reviewing. – Dalija Prasnikar Apr 21 at 12:28
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When you find questions getting answered that should not be answered then close and delete them. Problem solved.

Your proposal has many flaws. Let me provide some counterarguments.

  1. People who post questions don't care about penalties. All they care about is whether they can ask the next question. Most people asking questions do not care about this site at all. Penalizing them won't work as they can just create another account and post the same question again.

  2. What's wrong with questions that show no attempt? If it is a simple question then you can probably close it as a duplicate. If there's no suitable answer existing then you can answer it. Why penalize people for answering questions at all?

  3. No, this will only lead to more vengeance. You can see who closed the question and it will result in more close wars or revenge downvotes.

  4. This will only make people put random links into the question. Too easy to cheat.

  5. We already have that. You can award a bounty to good answers.

  6. The daily reputation is already capped. Capping the reputation gain on answers would do the opposite. People will have to answer more questions to get the same amount of reputation. This will lead to less questions closed and more of them answered.

If we want to improve the quality then Stack Exchange needs to do something to help people understand how to contribute better questions!

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    Yes, for god's sake! Education, not punishment - this is the only way forward if we are to stay afloat (and not drown either in bad questions or constant complaints). – Oleg Valter Apr 21 at 17:08
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A couple of practical considerations:

  • You're suggesting an awful lot of subjective criteria for an automated system to handle with any kind of reliability and repeatability. There's pretty much no way to make this work without moderating by hand, and that is a non-starter.

  • People have a way of doing very peoply things, like acting solely on their own interests. The users that care anything about the quality of the content on this site don't need a stick. For those users that don't, no stick is big enough.

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  • LOL on the stick. I don't think a site this large can work without automation. Moderation should help train the automation. However, in this rate, the moderators will be the very users who gain from this problem, so can their judgement be trusted? – Danny Varod Apr 21 at 12:20
  • What specific problem do you mean, and how do the moderators gain by it? – Mark Benningfield Apr 21 at 12:23
  • The problem is reputation-points farming and as those doing it get high reputation and thus moderation access, their motivation for stopping it is low. – Danny Varod Apr 21 at 17:32
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I would like to share my opinion on this.

  1. Give a penalty for posting questions that are obvious duplicate... How: save list of related at time of post, check if close vote includes a link from there.

Consider this: Pretty much every post on Stack Overflow has a public "Related" list on the right side of the post, be the post completely unique or a duplicate, and many times the "Related" posts aren't related at all.

So... how would checking if a close vote includes a link from there make any difference? If anything, it might be prone to abuse; a user who wants to give the OP a penalty could simply copy any link from the "Related" list and use it as a close vote target.

If you had a separate list of related posts in mind, for example, a more accurate one, wouldn't the developers of Stack Overflow have used that more accurate list in place of the "Related" list we currently have?

  1. Give a penalty for answers to questions with no attempt in them by OP... Why: discourage users from answering for rep without filtering for quality.

Why would answering a question with no attempt posted by the OP be categorized as "answering for rep"? I really don't understand...

  1. Reduce rep gained from an answers to zero (if higher) if question is closed. Why: discourage users from answering for rep without filtering for quality.

Interesting... but have you considered posts getting reopened? Say a user answered a post, their answer was upvoted and got accepted, but the question later got closed as "needs details or clarity". So the answerer lost the rep... but later the OP of the question added more details, and the question got reopened. Should the answerer get their rep back?

As you know, gold tag badge holders have the privilege to single-handedly close certain posts. Are you suggesting that users all over should have the power to single-handedly take away 10s to 100s of another user's rep? That's prone to abuse.

  1. Award less rep to questions where OP did not link to related questions or documentation. Why: encourage users to post high quality questions.

How does not linking to related questions or documentations mean that a question isn't high quality? What do you call "related"? If you're talking about questions that ask the same question, then the OP wouldn't have posted in the first place because the question already exists. Otherwise, we already have the "Related" list on the right side of the post. And what documentation? If linking to documentation became mandatory, the OP, for example, asking a Java question could just link to Java's home page.

  1. Award more rep to "hard" questions and answers than "easy" questions and answers... if multiple answers posted quickly, it's easy.

What is hard and easy is completely a matter of opinion. Multiple answers posted quickly does not mean that the question is easy. If this were to be how reputation from votes is measured, Stack Overflow would become far less productive; answerers might delay to post their answers in order to gain more rep.

  1. Cap reputation at 20 per post... Why: popular questions aren't better, they are just for more used topics.

The thing is, nobody said that more upvotes equals better. When a post has a lot of upvotes, it means that the post was helpful to many. A post could have the highest quality, and still have little upvotes, and it would be completely normal.

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  • Thanks for giving serious consideration to the suggestions. These were just raw ideas, I hoped more people would actually think about them and suggest alternatives or improvements. Regarding your feedback, some of these issues could actual be solved using various algorithms, if someone put serious effort into an attempt to do so. – Danny Varod Apr 24 at 0:24
  • @DannyVarod You're welcome, and thank you! But keep in mind that downvotes already do a pretty good job when it comes to giving off-topic/low quality posts a penalty. Also, you would need some super advanced algorithms to determine things like if a post is low quality without loads of false positives; that is why we have review queues. – Ann Zen Apr 24 at 2:40

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