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I asked this question:

How can I figure out where SpamAssassin is ultimately pulling the PDS_OTHER_BAD_TLD list from?

(Please note the question includes a link to the code of the relevant plugin.)

This is the close reason:

We don’t allow questions about professional server or networking-related infrastructure administration on Stack Overflow.

I have added emphasis on the key part of this statement that does not seem to correlate with my question, which is actually about how to discover where a plugin is pulling information from.

How does Stack Overflow define "administration"?

(In case there is any confusion, my purpose for asking this is not to attempt to re-open my closed question, as there is a different tool created for that.)

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    it's ultimately defined by the users with the privilege to cast close votes. – Kevin B Apr 19 at 16:39
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    Now, I don't have much knowledge in administrating a server, but from a quick look, your question doesn't look like it has anything to do with coding/programming, but more of configuring a server. Asking how a code inside a plugin works doesn't really mean it's programming-related. Unless it's not the case, perhaps it was due to how the question was worded which suggested the close voters' action. – Andrew T. Apr 19 at 16:42
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    @KevinB This seems a difficult standard to meet... – Paul Apr 19 at 16:43
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    @Paul i mean, that's... how the system works. Stackoverflow is moderated largely by it's community. – Kevin B Apr 19 at 16:44
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    @AndrewT. The only way to know the ultimate goal of the person asking the question is to ask, but nobody asked for any clarity. My guess is that they assumed to know why I was asking the question because spamassassin questions can only be about configuration. As it happens, the ultimate goal of asking my question is to attempt to generate a tool for checking that a TLD is on that list as a contribution to an open source project, which seems an on-topic goal for Stack Overflow? Does it seem reasonable that such discussion be included in every question asking about a server software? – Paul Apr 19 at 16:48
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    Your “ultimate goal” is not what makes the question on-topic or not. The question is either about a programming issue or it is not. – yivi Apr 19 at 16:50
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    @yivi The question here in Meta is about the definition of administration in the context of the close reason. My original question is not about server administration at least as I understand the use of that word. Do you care to address my question here in meta? – Paul Apr 19 at 16:53
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    @Paul: Your question doesn't seem to be about programming -> offtopic. That you need to knowledge to write a program doesn't make it a programming question. – BDL Apr 19 at 17:00
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    When voting to close off topic questions, close voters sometimes pick the close reason that seems more accurate, although with some off-topic questions it’s not easy. The close reason list is not exhaustive, a question may be off-topic for more than one reason, etc. instead of worrying about the accuracy about “server administration “, it’s more productive to focus about the topicality of the original question. – yivi Apr 19 at 17:02
  • So why select any reason? Seems like some people went through a lot of trouble to create those reasons. Just chalk it up to "where the dart landed"? – Paul Apr 19 at 17:03
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    Voters try to pick the one they think better describe the situation. If many voters have trouble picking the “right” reason, maybe the question was unclear. And that’s another close reason. – yivi Apr 19 at 17:05
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    "Does it seem reasonable that such discussion be included in every question asking about a server software?" - No. But if there is a doubt for your question to be on-topic and you can clear that doubt in the question itself - why not do it? – Tomerikoo Apr 19 at 17:08
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    Nobody requested clarity, so I did not know to clarify. – Paul Apr 19 at 17:14
  • Something that was removed from that reason at some point: "unless they directly involve programming or programming tools". I was actually a bit surprised to find "administration" has been there all along; the reason works about the same without it (possibly better, or possibly worse). The point is less about the exact definition of this category of questions and more about them not being programming questions. – Bernhard Barker Apr 20 at 18:40
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I have added emphasis on the key part of this statement that does not seem to correlate with my question, which is actually about how to discover where a plugin is pulling information from.

Your question was closed due to it appearing to be a SpamAssassin configuration question. Your question on Stack Overflow does not contain a single line of code. This is evident due to the close reason that was selected.

This question does not meet Stack Overflow guidelines. It is not currently accepting answers.

How does Stack Overflow define "administration"?

I would define it as a question asking how to configure SpamAssassin to behave in a specific way. This would fall in the category of the administration of a server.

The only way to know the ultimate goal of the person asking the question is to ask, but nobody asked for any clarity. My guess is that they assumed to know why I was asking the question because SpamAssassin questions can only be about configuration. As it happens, the ultimate goal of asking my question is to attempt to generate a tool for checking that a TLD is on that list as a contribution to an open source project, which seems an on-topic goal for Stack Overflow? Does it seem reasonable that such discussion be included in every question asking about a server software?

The users who voted to close your question could only make their decision based on what you actually submitted. The user who voted to close your question are not new users. They all have more than 3,000 reputation on Stack Overflow, combined, and they have answered nearly 2,000 questions.

The question here in Meta is about the definition of administration in the context of the close reason. My original question is not about server administration at least as I understand the use of that word. Do you care to address my question here in meta?

While you might not have intended to have your question interpreted as a SpamAssassin configuration, that certainly was my first thought, when I read the question.

Nobody requested clarity, so I did not know to clarify.

The users who voted to close your question, probably didn't feel your question could be modified into something that was within scope, so they didn't bother submitting a comment. However, you could edit your question and upon the first edit, it would be placed in a queue to be reopened.

On a side note, I was able to find the file without much difficulty: 20_ntld.cf which might have been another reason the users voted to close your question. This file being the culprit was also submitted as a comment to your question.

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I would suggest that the definition of "server administration" is those topics that are:

  1. Not programs or programmatic actions
    • Include in this scripting and web development, generally, but Powershell and ZSH scripting blur this line some
  2. Not directly related to tools that are used by programmers to program
    • Or are related to administering tools that support many programmers, but would not generally be managed by/for a single programmer; some gray area here (RStudio questions, for example)
  3. Are related to a multi-user computing environment, and generally will affect many users

Once upon a time I'd have put a 4. there - 'Are usually performed by someone with a title of "XXXXXXX Administrator"' - but with DevOps being a thing nowadays, that's not so clear.

Most important though is the distinction between "Off topic for Stack Overflow" and "On topic for Server Fault" - Those aren't the same thing, and there are things that might be on topic in both places (some of the scripting might, for example). I would focus on what is on topic here - which roughly is covered by 1 and 2 - and then if it's not on topic here, as I think your question probably isn't, you can find another site it might be on. I'm not sure if it's on topic on Server Fault or not - it might be, but it also might be more of a SuperUser question or somewhere else.

Don't get too caught up in what the close reason is - sometimes people pick reasons that seem right to them but don't exactly match what they really mean. That's especially true with things closed that are somewhere near server administration - users will pick that reason even if they really mean something more like "This is a question about configuring software which isn't really a programming question" because there's no specific reason like that, and they don't have the energy to type out a custom close reason. They have to pick something, and they pick what's closest.

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    The question as it’s written has some problems, I personally cannot recommend, it being migrated to SF or SU in its current form. – Security Hound Apr 19 at 22:19
  • I’ve got to disagree with you in one place: like it or not, both web dev and scripting are programmatic actions, and neither is necessarily server administration – D. Ben Knoble Apr 20 at 21:31
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Administration is whatever task you need an administrator (or root) to accomplish. Configuration, installation, uninstallation, etc. of user-facing software using superuser tools. These exclude stuff that is being done programmatically, like using an API (like python-apt).

Now, some companies try to blur the distinction (PowerShell). In these cases always presume it's not programming.

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    I don't agree with this simplistic definition - because we support "... programmer tools". Lots of programmer tools require local administrative rights to install, but aren't off-topic here. – Joe Apr 19 at 21:28
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    @Joe It's not "programming tools" it is "software tools commonly used by programmers; and is a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development" There's an "and" there. – Braiam Apr 20 at 0:59

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