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Since I recently got unbanned from reviewing (YAY!!!), I've been reviewing crazily for the past few days and have therefore accumulated a ludicrous amount (105) of pending flags:

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Should I wait for a little for my backlog of flags to clear, or should I continue flagging away?

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    Wouldn't be surprised if there is some caching of non critical data/pages like flag summary to cut down server load – charlietfl Apr 17 at 23:18
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    The biggest question is, what have you learned from your review ban? Whether you should continue flagging should hinge on that. – jaco0646 Apr 18 at 13:04
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    I regularly have between 30-50 pending flags. At the moment I have 19 pending flags. I remember a few times I had 0 pending flags. It might take a few weeks but eventually they all get handled. – Dharman Apr 18 at 14:48
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    If you got unbanned from reviewing, you might want to think why you got banned in the first place. It might have been the case that you understood something wrong. – dan1st Apr 19 at 5:17
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    "Should I wait for a little for my backlog of flags to clear, or should I continue flagging away?" My two cents. Wait a bit and see how many of them are helpful. If most of them are, continue like hell. And 105 surely isn't a ludicrous amount. – Trilarion Apr 19 at 7:45
  • Ton? Don't you mean quintal? – Sagar V Apr 19 at 17:49
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    @jaco0646 439 helpful, 18 declined. Seems pretty legit to me! – M-Chen-3 Apr 19 at 18:17
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    @GoodbyeStackExchange Note there is a difference between valid declined and invalid ones. I've had too many valid correct flags being wrongly declined by moderators. Where the correct action was eventually taken but the declines still exist. – Spencer Wieczorek Apr 19 at 20:36
  • I think my average pending flags is ~0. My peak is probably around 10, and that was all on comments during a flamewar. – user4581301 Apr 20 at 19:58
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Don't worry about having a lot of pending flags, they'll get handled eventually. Depending on the kind of flag, it may get handled by other users (e.g. when a NAA flagged post is deleted via review). Other flags (e.g. "Needs moderator intervention") will need to be handled by a moderator, and that can take some time. Some flags also age away after some time, but there's not much you can do about that.

Of course, you should make sure that you are only raising flags appropriately. For example, don't raise flags for the purpose of boosting your flagging stats. If you're only raising flags for content that needs to be flagged, then you're doing the right thing, and you needn't worry about having a lot of flags that haven't been reviewed yet.

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    Close flags in particular are only handled by users, not moderators, and there is generally a large backlog (several thousand) of close flags to review, so they often don't get reviewed and age away. – Ryan M Apr 18 at 2:12
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    "...they'll get handled eventually...Some flags also age away after some time..." That isn't consistent unless ignoring is categorized as handled. A reason not to continue flagging would indeed be a bottleneck in the consumption of the flags. – Trilarion Apr 19 at 7:48
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    @Trilarion True, but there's no way for a user to know if a flag is going to age away or not. I don't want users to not raise flags because they feel (since there's no way of knowing for sure) that they might age away. It's much more preferable for valid flags to age away than for valid flags to not be raised at all. – cigien Apr 19 at 13:56
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    "It's much more preferable..." Depends on who you are. If you are the one doing the flagging it might seem like a potential waste of time. For all others of course it's beneficial. It probably means that some feedback about the fraction of aged-away flags would be helpful, even only on a global scale. – Trilarion Apr 19 at 14:52

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