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What can I give a contributor, except the joy of helping? How do I properly thank a developer when they spent two full afternoons with my very awkward issue?

Do I encourage upvotes on their answer at the beginning of my question? Can I nominate them for anything?

Or do I just accept that they are here for the puzzles?

This is probably a stupid question, but I'm just trying to show my full gratitude by every means possible.

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    Nothing, this isn't a social network. People contribute here for many reasons, rep, recognition, the fun of helping someone, self learning, etc. No one thing you could do would please everyone, so stick to what's available: upvote, accept the answer, and when you have the rep to do so you can offer bounties. – Kevin B Apr 5 at 14:45
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    When you have enough rep, remember to upvote their answer. ;) – PM 2Ring Apr 5 at 14:47
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    Although mentioned in passing in BoltClock's answer, once you earn at least 75 reputation, you can place a bounty on one of your questions that the user answered and subsequently award the bounty to them. This effectively transfers your reputation to them. Even if you can't come up with good questions or answers, find some existing ones that could use typographical or English language cleanup and propose some high quality edits. Each one that is approved earns you +2 reputation. – Ian Campbell Apr 5 at 22:29
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    @OlegValter Setting the right tone with such a popup would be tricky; see e.g. the related discussion in this Q&A. All in all, I think a larger issue still is that there is a lot of capricious voting in Meta, and nothing short of a culture change will fix that. – duplode Apr 5 at 23:16
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    @Oleg Valter: "and a moderator reacted nearly instantly with a detailed answer :)" Reading this absolutely made my day, I'm not even exaggerating, thank you. I've been a massive proponent of the welcoming movement even if I remain bitter towards Stack co. wrt issues I'd rather not talk about, and I can't stand seeing new users dogpiled by downvotes, especially this OP who's had an unconventionally good experience just before. I had to react, and I had to act fast. I haven't FGITW'd a meta question - or FGITW'd this hard any question - in a long long time. And I'm so glad it paid off. – BoltClock Mod Apr 6 at 5:21
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    @Oleg Valter: I've now done a thing where I've answered a meta question by a new-ish user who's had a thoroughly negative experience on both main and meta, and now one by a new user who's had a positive experience on main and been, I paraphrase them, intimidated, by meta, back to back within a day. And perhaps I might be the only person willing to go to such lengths against the grain, and I've yet to see how much good it'll do in the long run, since I'm just one person. But I'm a moderator, and I want to make the most out of my platform, for change. – BoltClock Mod Apr 6 at 5:26
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    For anyone who thinks downvotes are for general disagreement please carefully read the What is meta? page - that caveat is about Feature requests only - it was never intended to apply to discussion questions. And if you think about it, this makes sense. A FR is a suggestion for a new feature for the site and is in that way equivalent to an answer (a solution, if you will) so downvotes on that solution do, in fact, indicate that someone feels the solution is a bad one. Discussions (and bugs, support) should be treated like all other questions – Catija ModStaff Apr 6 at 5:36
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    Pay it forward, by contributing great content (questions and answers). – Matthieu M. Apr 6 at 9:31
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    @BoltClock you surely helped it made it go from -10 to +60, that's a feat :) Have we another system in place to express a sentiment (I will address Catija's point separately), I am pretty sure Meta wouldn't even look like a scary place to go. I am not a big fan of the welcoming movement because I think it is misguided in its attempt to compell people to be nice, but I can get behind the better aspects of it (like this Q&A). – Oleg Valter Apr 6 at 14:30
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    Btw, I usually do not inquire about comments and such, but why exactly was the comment BoltClock responded to deleted? – Oleg Valter Apr 6 at 14:36
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    @Oleg Valter: Yeah, I agree with the welcoming initiative in sentiment, just not its execution. Another mod cleaned up the comments talking about the initial downvotes. – BoltClock Mod Apr 6 at 14:54
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    @Catija - we are all aware of that page (at least I hope this is the case). There is one little problem: you are standing in the middle of the radioactive wasteland and saying "you are not supposed to launch nukes". Should the voting work the way you say it should, Meta would be much scarier place than it is right now. [Odiin - I am sorry in advance for what I am about to say, please disregard the harshness of what follows] Should the post be treated for its objective quality (usefulness), the "does not show any research effort" applies - you know which tooltip it is for. That said, [1/2] – Oleg Valter Apr 6 at 14:57
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    Can I nominate them for anything? Typically no, however, there may be the rare exception to "regale us with a tale of a Stack Overflow user going way above and beyond the call of duty in order to actually teach something to someone that wanted to learn" – C8H10N4O2 Apr 6 at 15:00
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    Didn't read any of the comments above yet. I'm shocked about the fact that 12 people downvoted this, as it just shows how (choose the term that fit the best) : evil/frustrated/arrogant/nonconstructive/elitists/unkind people are frequenting Meta. What is bad in this question? Why would this very kind question from a kind new user, would be bad and deserve a downvote? I know downvotes doesn't mean the same here as on SO, but in this particular scenario, I don't see why someone would use the downvote button to answer the question, like "do nothing" or "I don't agree with you". – Thomas G Apr 6 at 15:51
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    @Peter Mortensen: I reopened the question for a reason. – BoltClock Mod Apr 7 at 3:38
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Welcome! I'm glad you've had a positive experience on Stack Overflow so far.

I'm the kind of person who's more than happy to dedicate anywhere from the better part of a day to a month to researching and answering a question I really like depending on the subject matter. You've probably heard this a million times by now, but sometimes, the joy of helping others really is the best gift we could ask for.

That said, I've had a few individuals thank me with anything ranging from extended thank-you comments (that I really wish I could keep), to full-on bounties. But you're new to the site, so you don't have enough reputation for a bounty. Unfortunately I don't think there is much else you can do for the user who helped you, directly, besides the usual upvote and accept. But you can pay it forward by trying your hand at answering some questions yourself. Or, if you prefer sticking to asking questions for now, continue asking well-written and well-researched questions following our guidelines.

Your latest question seems to be one where the answerer spent time walking you through your problem after posting their original answer. Generally, extended comment discussions do get frowned upon as they can get unwieldy fairly quickly. In this case you managed to sort things out, but do be careful when asking future questions to keep your question well-scoped and state your needs, assumptions and restrictions upfront. This makes it easier to answer your question without having to get too involved after the fact. Not that we don't want to spend time helping others, but it does make things easier not just for us but for question askers too in the long run.

Thanking others is something that gets asked a lot here, but I wanted to address some of the options you had in mind:

Do I encourage upvotes on their answer at the beginning of my question?

This isn't recommended; votes are regulated quite strictly here and as such, we can't condone editorializing a question to encourage readers to vote on the accepted (or any other specific) answer, or voting on answers by specific users at the expense of others. Great answers will speak for themselves, and you'll find that popular Q&As do tend to receive a healthy amount of votes over time.

Can I nominate them for anything?

I don't think so! Not directly. There are badges you can earn on your profile for answers that cross certain voting milestones, but the questions do have to be pretty popular for them to receive enough votes.

Or do I just accept that they are here for the puzzles?

I for one can tell you that having interesting questions to answer has been one of my central driving motivators for coming to Stack Overflow over the years. And although I've tapered off lately, well, I'm still here. Some other users are here more for the reputation score than the joy of helping others, but I suppose as long as it motivates them to produce compelling, educational answers, everyone still wins.

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    "so far".... :P – Andras Deak Apr 5 at 21:59
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    "extended comment discussions do get frowned upon as they can get unwieldy fairly quickly" - they also typically don't really fit into the Q&A format (unless perhaps they end with an edit to clarify the answer) and they could mean the question was asked in a way that won't be helpful to anyone else with the same problem (having questions that can also help others is something we strive towards). – Bernhard Barker Apr 6 at 10:31
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    I'm a big proponent of the "extended thank-you comments" that you mentioned. Those are the best. A bounty is nice but doesn't have the power of a really thoughtful thank you... for me at least. – JeffC Apr 6 at 16:40
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    @JeffC: I get some under my popular answers, appreciate the thoughtfulness that's been put into explaining how exactly I've helped or what sort of impact I've made... then check back several months or years later and find them gone, get sad about it, and sometimes even undelete them only for them to be deleted again later. It's probably the closest thing I have done to mod abuse. It never ends. I get not wanting the comments to be cluttered, but I would like to be able to keep at least one or two around, for other viewers to upvote if nothing else. – BoltClock Mod Apr 6 at 16:44
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    @BoltClock Agreed... I think SO is a little too "aggressive" about categorizing human kindness, please and thank yous, etc., as "clutter". I'm fine with "Thanks for the help in advance" in the question and so on but I can understand deleting hundreds of generic "Thanks" or "Thank you" comments under questions or answers. We could probably use a little more mutual human kindness in SO right now (as in the last few years). – JeffC Apr 6 at 16:51
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    I personally don't mind thank you comments. When I used to get them I felt really happy, but they would get deleted in like 5 minutes unfortunately. – 10 Rep Apr 6 at 18:50
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    I've gotten the rare "@Flydog57's answer was the perfect fit for my question; too bad all I can do is accept and upvote it" (or something like that). It warmed my heart's cockles (whatever that means). – Flydog57 Apr 6 at 23:14
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    @Flydog57: Oh god, that idiom has become a meme where I live. – BoltClock Mod Apr 7 at 3:36
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Sort of related:
https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/403859/704803

While self-promotion isn't allowed in comments/answers, it is allowed on profiles.

On one occasion somebody gave me a really helpful answer, so I checked his profile and saw that he specialized in that tag and had a Ko-fi link, so I sent him a few dollars as a form of gratitude.

So while that is not common, it doesn't hurt to check their profile and see if they list any specific way that you can give thanks there. This doesn’t necessarily have to be a donation, maybe they published an e-book or a related package that you could download and support them in that way.

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