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Can a question which was asked in an online assessment be asked on stackoverflow?

Companies usually outsource online assessments to Hackerrank, Codility, etc. who have a non-sharing policy. They also tend to reuse the questions for a certain period of time.

If any such question is posted on stackoverflow, does it go against stackoverflow policies? It is also unfair to companies and other applicants who are attempting the test honestly.

Note: assuming the question is clear, shows effort, and demonstrates understanding.

I am revisiting on this post from 2016, now that the first step for remote interviews is an online assessment.

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    If someone states "I got asked this in an interview" it is completely irrelevant noise. Throw that out and treat the question as any other
    – charlietfl
    Mar 28 '21 at 10:54
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    @charlietfl I agree. However, there is basically one reason to mention it - to justify asking the question because otherwise comments would ask "Why are you trying to do instead of X"? where X is usually some well known part of the standard library and the question asks to re-create it.
    – VLAZ
    Mar 28 '21 at 11:19
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    I think this question conflating 2 issues: 1) interview questions (which Robert has linked to the existing discussion), and 2) online programming assessment, which the following discussion is kind of related: How to deal if the user asks for code in online programming competition?
    – Andrew T.
    Mar 28 '21 at 11:21
  • Hackerrank ToS does not have a clause preventing you from sharing. Codility's does, though (frankly, upon reading it, the latter's ToS has a lot of legal bs). You (as a poster) are usually solely responsible for ensuring you have the necessary rights to the content being posted but be prepared for the content to be taken down through a request (and if a company has the "no share" policy explicitly stated, it'd be safe to assume they also keep lawers around to enforce it). Mar 28 '21 at 12:18
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The origin of the question is not what matters, but rather instead it is the question's quality and site relevance that do, both of which are independent of origin.

Having said that, in my experience, many interview and homework-type questions are of low-quality and are often closed, but for the usual reasons -- too broad, unclear, and especially duplicate -- and again, not because they are interview or homework-related questions but more likely because (in my experience) most who ask these types of questions are new to the site.

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  • the homework question shpuld show some effort of solving it. so that comments can help. but most questions can be found here any way
    – nbk
    Mar 28 '21 at 11:03
  • Some interview questions are clear like "design an algorithm to do X". Precise, answerable. Others are deliberately not and expect the interviewee to ask follow-up questions. These aren't a good fit for Stack Overflow because we cannot ask these. Some interview questions are also just plain bad. That's just the source. Asking a question on SO is yet another hurdle.
    – VLAZ
    Mar 28 '21 at 11:23
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    Okay. Noted. Personally, I’ll avoid answering such questions only for the fact that it might help future test takers cheat. Mar 28 '21 at 11:27
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    @HarshalParekh - That is a good reason to decide to not answer (IMO) ... but it is a personal reason. StackOverflow policy is agnostic with respect to "cheating". It is neither encouraged or actively discouraged as a matter of policy.
    – Stephen C
    Mar 29 '21 at 4:42
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    "Some interview questions are also just plain bad." - like the annoying "how many objects are created by this Java code" questions. For which there is no correct answer.
    – Stephen C
    Mar 29 '21 at 4:46

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