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This is linked to Should Docker questions go on Stack Overflow, Server Fault, or Super User?

I am dealing with Docker and docker-compose for a few weeks only, still rather a beginner. Thus, I might be wrong in my view here.

Up to now, I have not had a single case where I would have seen the questions arising from that work as on-topic on Stack Overflow, in the sense that it would be about programming. It is just the management of parameters and commands. You can, of course, ask questions about real code inside Docker, and then it should be on-topic. I have not seen any such code up to now.

The question arises from this meta discussion in the comments below the question of How to run docker-compose with custom filename [duplicate].

(Please note: the question here is not about whether there is a wrong duplicate assigned or not.)

The question: Is an easy Docker question about a command parameter and which does not have any programming in it off-topic? And as a side-note, you could add where it should be placed. I am curious where this question would have to be put, is it

  • Stack Overflow
  • Super User
  • Unix & Linux
  • Server Fault
  • (Ask Ubuntu makes no sense to me as it is already a too-detailed choice of what Docker can do.)
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    "It is just management of parameters and commands." Hmm, well. If you're doing this by changing particular configuration files and application parameters, that seems indeed more related to topics handled at SuperUser, than programming problem oriented sites. – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 27 at 11:13
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    I haven't used docker, but if its a tool primarily used by programmers, it's on topic regardless of whether or not it could also be answered on sites like SU. – Nick Mar 27 at 11:18
  • A Docker project manager can run the already done programming, without ever doing any programming task. – questionto42 Mar 27 at 11:21
  • It's not necessarily about if the task involves programming, it's about if the task is primarily associated with programming. Configuring visual studio doesn't involve any programming task, but can be on topic – Nick Mar 27 at 11:23
  • @Nick I have missed that little detail, good to know. "That wraps it up. No more questions from my side." ;) – questionto42 Mar 27 at 11:27
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    Related to the close reason: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/357485/… – Nick Mar 27 at 11:29
  • And I imagine you'd get a lot of differing opinions on this topic, some will think they're off topic, others on topic... I don't know enough to vote either way – Nick Mar 27 at 11:31
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    I feel that merely using docker is not "a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development", even when interpreting "unique" very liberally. But your rules lawyering may vary. – MisterMiyagi Mar 27 at 11:36
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    This is much similar as Apache Url Rewrite, or (L|W)AMP stack, or cPanel questions. Another minefield of topicality. – rene Mar 27 at 12:19
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    As a beginner of Docker myself, I think that this is on-topic on both (multiple) sites since Docker can be an integral process of CI/CD (possibly on-topic on SO, like the interaction between Maven/Gradle with Docker), but can also be run independently and unrelated to programming at all (possibly on-topic on any other sites that are not SO, like using it as a "mini virtual machine"). – Andrew T. Mar 27 at 14:46
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    @AndrewT. that's why 'the problem unique to software development', the task, not the tool, is what determine topically. – Braiam Mar 27 at 14:50
  • I don't think it belongs on SuperUser. It's not a bad question. – Evan Carroll Mar 28 at 5:06
  • I've seen both programming-related and non-programming related Docker questions; I opined a little further on this in Question about running Docker got closed. This specific question could be easily answered with docker-compose --help, and I'm not clear it'd be a great match for any SE site. – David Maze Mar 28 at 17:04
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    This is one of those questions that I just can't answer for myself. Both yes and no have perfectly valid arguments. As a developer yes I am confronted with Docker and yes I do find a lot of answers to problems, specifically to do with docker(-compose) files on Stack Overflow. But docker COMMANDS... docker is documented, I don't need Stack Overflow for those. So where do you draw the line between a programming problem and a basic usage problem caused by not reading the manual... hard to say. – Gimby Mar 29 at 13:34
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Containerization itself requires Linux because only Linux supports cgroups and kernel namespaces. For this reason, all questions on Docker are suitable for Unix and Linux SE, and this is where I'd advise you to ask them. That's where I ask my questions about Docker, Podman, and Buildah.

But there is another strong option not yet mentioned, DevOps StackExchange which has 800+ questions on Docker now too. You'd likely find the expertise you need there as well.

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    I'm not going to debate that Docker for Windows is a thing. My gut feeling was that these type of questions would be better served on other sites and your answer nicely lists the sites I had in mind. This still leaves open if say creating a compose file is considered a task often faced by programmers. Can you share some strong arguments that it is not so we can safely close and migrate all Docker usage stuff away from SO and to sunnier places. – rene Mar 28 at 6:04
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    I don't think this actually answers the question. Just because something is on-topic on another SE does not mean it is off-topic on SO. – MisterMiyagi Mar 28 at 6:21
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    @MisterMiyagi I'm not concerned with what's on topic on SO. I'm concerned with what's best for humanity. And the best thing for humanity isn't to reduce a question to "if I squint hard enough can this question about not-programming be on topic on a programming site." You can get to Tallahassee on a dog sled, but that's hardly the right way to address the problem. – Evan Carroll Mar 28 at 18:08
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    @rene Docker for Windows runs Linux in a virtual machine, so it's a thing. But it's a Linux Thing. ;) I do think creating a Docker Compose file is a task a programmer may do, like editing his projects logo in gimp, but I do not think doing that task should make it on topic at StackOverflow. And, regardless, I don't think that's the best place for it. =) I would shop the two sites I listed above as they seem like better homes for the question (to me). U & L works great for me on my podman/buildah questions. Dan Walsh, the creator of the tech, uses the site too. – Evan Carroll Mar 28 at 18:12
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    I was sold after the Logo -> Gimp argument ... let's move it, move it, move it ... – rene Mar 28 at 18:22
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    I consider docker equally much a developer tool as e.g. git – Jonas Mar 28 at 22:14
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    @Jonas the word "develop" occurs 7 times in man git, 0 times in man docker. I can't see how a method to deploy software is as much of a development tool as a method to create software. Why should docker, or containers as a deployment platform be any more on topic than Windows XP as a deployment platform. And regardless, even if you really want to make that argument it seems even more far fetched to argue it's more on topic here than elsewhere. – Evan Carroll Mar 28 at 22:25
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    @EvanCarroll I guess we all have seen at least one Tallahassee dog sled parade on SO. Unless it is off-topic on SO, with at least some metapost to for reference, it's hard to get humans to do what's best for humanity. – MisterMiyagi Mar 29 at 6:03
  • I have just posted my ROS Docker question on Robotics, that is missing in the list as well. In the end, the split exchanges are in order to get the experts together (and make the voting points a gain of a certain expert topic only). If I wanted to post the same questions on DevOps, which I would now see as the best Docker exchange, then that site would not have any ROS tags again. If the core is about an expert topic, go to that expert site. If it is not, go to DevOps. Do not use Stack Overflow ;). – questionto42 Mar 29 at 15:16
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    Unix & Linux makes no general sense (and then perhaps no sense at all) since you can as well deal with Windows if you use WSL2. I have just worked on Windows related questions for many days - and they are all even typical "Docker" questions. – questionto42 Mar 29 at 15:18
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    @questionto42 WSL2 is literally a Linux Kernel virtualized on a Microsoft Hypervisor (Hyper-V). I'm not sure why that would be no sense at all. You're running software made for Linux, on Linux just virtualized by Hyper-V. Would your opinion change if you were running Docker on Ubuntu under Ubuntu's VirtualBox (which is itself a hypervisor)? What about Docker on Ubuntu under Windows VirtualBox? What about Docker on Ubuntu using Microsoft Hyper-V? What about Docker on the Linux Kernel (without apt or rpm) under Hyper-V? Because that's pretty much all we're talking about. – Evan Carroll Mar 29 at 15:40
  • @EvanCarroll don't forget Docker Windows Containers ;) docker.com/products/windows-containers – Jonas Mar 29 at 17:01
  • @EvanCarroll I had to deal with some Windows questions because I had to setup a Windows X server as a frontend of the visualization that was fed by Docker's Linux on WSL2. WSL = "Windows Subsystem for Linux" says it all. Of course, the Docker script is on Linux, but the work is about the two. Docker questions on Unix&Linux do not cover this. And on Ubuntu even less, I could also run Docker on Debian or Red Hat with the same questions arising. That is why I see DevOps as a promising idea. All Docker questions on Stack Overflow should be force-moved to it :). – questionto42 Mar 29 at 20:28

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