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This is not a duplicate of How should I flag questions trying to get around the “This post is mostly code” filter? because my flag was declined, meaning that the answers there are irrelevant to my question.

This question contains at the end:

It looks like your post is mostly code; please add some more details. It looks like your post is mostly code; please add some more details. It looks like your post is mostly code; please add some more details. It looks like your post is mostly code; please add some more details.

This is obvious filler, so I raised a custom moderator flag. That got declined, so I raised another fully explaining the situation, and that got declined too: Flags Does this mean that filler is allowed? If so, this effectively makes the filter useless.

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    Why is a custom mod flag needed? Just flag it for "Needs details or clarity". – M-Chen-3 Mar 20 at 15:36
  • @M-Chen-3 I think it had all of the details it needed, also if the custom flag was declined because it was a custom flag, I wouldn't have been told "flags should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention". – Anonymous Mar 20 at 15:39
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    Dunno what stopped you from suggesting an edit - removed the filler without triggering it just fine with a couple of improvements. Still a "code dump"-style question, though – Oleg Valter Mar 20 at 17:17
  • @OlegValter Strange, maybe it was edited between when I tried to edit and when you did or maybe it has something to do with the fact that you have 5,000 rep (they never did tell us the details of the filter). – Anonymous Mar 20 at 17:19
  • @Anonymous - I just removed several empty lines of code - that helps sometimes. 5K rep only gives the ability to edit posts without review (actually, 2K rep, the rest is irrelevant). Anyways, most likely it will be roomba'd, closed or deleted in the process, so I am not sure if it was worth it in the first place. – Oleg Valter Mar 20 at 17:25
  • @OlegValter there are extra restrictions on suggested edits that are gone at 2k rep. For example, there is a minimum amount of characters to edit for a suggestion to be allowed. With 2k rep you can make single character edits. I can't remember exactly if a suggested edit can bring a post under the threshold for "mostly code" but it stands to reason that maybe it doesn't. After all, the limit was active for OP, so it seems like a suggested edit might be bound by the same restriction. – VLAZ Mar 20 at 18:46
  • @VLAZ Once, I made a change that didn't add more code but still got that message, so it seems that it's more restricting to edit then to post for >2k rep users. – Anonymous Mar 20 at 18:52
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    Yep seems like <2k rep editors do get affected by the same filter: Question that is “mostly code” gets asked, but can't be edited | Is there a way to edit a “mostly code” question? – VLAZ Mar 20 at 18:54
  • @VLAZ - yeah, I know about the restriction on the minimum size of the suggested edit, but am not aware of any others (MSE FAQ item does not indicate there are any: meta.stackexchange.com/a/76284/786798. Will be grateful for any post to improve my reference list, though :)) that are specific to <2K – Oleg Valter Mar 20 at 18:58
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    @OlegValter I'm trying to find a canonical reference but it's not easy. Overall, suggested edits aren't explained in great detail. It's hard to find concrete information. I did list two posts that confirmed that suggested edits were stopped by the same filter. I remember other posts around the same thing, as well. But there isn't something I can find that lists all limitations on suggested edits outside the minimum character rule. Conversely, the full edit privilege just says that you can edit everything as if it's your own post - not quite descriptive. – VLAZ Mar 20 at 19:05
  • @VLAZ I tried to find one as well, but the best I could find is the MSE post, and it does not get into detail on whether there are any other restrictions for suggested edits. It seems like hitting a quality filter is just related to fixing the OPs post to the point where the filter is finally able to see that the post is "mostly code". Since OPs often break formatting to circumvent the filter, when editors bring the code back in proper code fences, they get hit by the filter. Not 100% sure on that, though – Oleg Valter Mar 20 at 19:08
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    Does this answer your question? Why was my custom flag declined? When should I use a custom flag? – John Montgomery Mar 22 at 17:41
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You have several options to try before a mod flag is needed to resolve the situation where OPs play tricks with our quality system.

  • leave a comment, explaining how they should improve the question
  • suggest an edit to make the needed improvements
  • flag to close the question as unclear/needs details
  • down vote the question for being not useful.

Only once those options are exhausted or are somehow reverted / rudely challenged by the OP it is time to raise a custom mod flag and explain what is going on and what you want to happen.

You're not alone curating, there are 6 to 8 other users around that can take it from where you left it.

Don't use custom mod flag as your first call to action. Use them once you've run out of options and a post or user behavior needs a human exception handler to sort out the mess.

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    I've already posted a comment, and got no response from the author. I can't suggest an edit because then the filter would trigger. This post has already been downvoted by other users, and I don't see how another downvote would change anything. – Anonymous Mar 20 at 16:01
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    Flag for closure then. You've done what you can. – rene Mar 20 at 16:03
  • I did. That's the custom flag I raised. – Anonymous Mar 20 at 16:10
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    @Anonymous Don't use custom flags to get the question closed. See Why was my custom flag declined? When should I use a custom flag? – Ivar Mar 20 at 16:21
  • @Ivar See the comment on the question. If the custom flag was declined because it was a custom flag, I wouldn't have been told "flags should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention". – Anonymous Mar 20 at 17:16
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    @Anonymous - this is a standard decline message for a custom flag, btw. Please don't take reasons literally. Besides, mods aren't editors or curators (they can be because they are active members of the community, but it is not in their "job" description). Normal users are able to resolve this without bothering mods. You could also drop by SOCVR chat and ask them to take a look since you are not involved with the question. – Oleg Valter Mar 20 at 17:21
  • @OlegValter I've had a custom flag declined before, and it said it was declined because it was a custom flag. Wouldn't one of the two moderators who reviewed my flag have done the same? – Anonymous Mar 20 at 17:24
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    @Anonymous - afaik, usually when a custom flag is declined because there are other non-bothering mods options that could be used instead, they are declined with "flags should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention". This was exactly the case both times, so I am not surprized they were declined with the same message – Oleg Valter Mar 20 at 17:38
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    Worth pointing out that, regarding the "flags should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention" message, closure of a question *doesn't require moderator intervention". The decline message is indeed an accurate one; mods don't get involved with the vast, vast majority of post closures, except for the uncommon cases for which custom flags are designed. This wasn't one of those cases. – zcoop98 Mar 22 at 15:32

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