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I spent a few days exploring the content of meta and discovered that the tag wiki is sorely lacking content. So as a part of exploring the content of meta, I began to update selected topics in the tag wiki with two types of information: (1) a selection of links to posts on the tag subject and (2) associated tags.

As I do not have a great deal of reputation nor the necessary reputation in any of the meta tags, any edits I made were suggested edits that were then reviewed and either approved or rejected. As far as I can tell from my limited experience few of my suggested edits were rejected by reviewers.

It appears that a user objected to the suggested wiki edits which has been approved and decided to revert them. They did this on at least two topics:

Why can a single person arbitrarily revert changes that have gone through a review just because they object to changes? This goes beyond modifying changes to make them more accurate or to remove an inappropriate tag or link.

screen shot of comments

I'm not sure what having these edits flagged for moderator attention means however I have seen nothing that indicates that a moderator has taken any action against my account.

The rationale for the changes I made

I made the two edit choices of links to posts and adding meta tags based on my experience with reviewing and editing product documentation as well as my experience editing Wikipedia. The goal was the DRY principle while maintaining all or most of what originally existed in the tag wiki entry and adding additional, useful content.

One helpful tag wiki entry I found was the wiki which had a list of the various types of flags with clickable links (see https://meta.stackoverflow.com/posts/250285/revisions) done back in 2018. The same user had done something similar for (see https://meta.stackoverflow.com/posts/250233/revisions).

What was nice about this was any reference to the meta tag of flags or reputation in any other topic in the tag wiki would lead the user to those lists. More importantly adding associated tags to a wiki entry was not something new that I just dreamed up.

For adding links to posts, I actively looked for posts that appeared to be used when closing a posted question as a dupe. I thought that since the community thought those posted questions were sufficient for using as canonical posts, then they should be part of the tag wiki entry in order for users to find them easily.

I found the following two posted meta discussions of people complaining about too many wiki edits:

Neither of these seem applicable to my questions.

Why so many edits in such a short time?

I'm retired and now have the time to explore Stack Overflow. I have spent little time on Meta until after retirement as I really didn't have much time for it. Just as I am now exploring some of the microcontroller Reddits because now I have time.

I also appear to be in the autistic spectrum which means that it is very easy for me to get sucked into something such as exploring links, reviewing content, and pulling together various threads of posts. For me there is a kind of joy in looking at just one more thing before I shut down for the day, one more time of comparing and contrasting various posts in order to develop a mental model of how it all fits together and then documenting those linkages.

Questions

When can a meta tag wiki be updated and under what conditions can a user suggest an edit?

How often can a user update the meta tag wiki and how many suggested edits can a user make per day?

What criteria should a user use to determine that a suggested edit that has been approved should be reverted?

How would I know what moderator action has been taken and how any such action has affected my account and the edits I have made in the meta tag wiki?

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    Oh, on the point of tag wikis - you probably know about that one, but this FAQ entry has very good guidance for writing tag wikis: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/318338/11407695 (just linking it here for the benefit of fellow tag editors) – Oleg Valter Mar 6 at 21:57
  • It's a little disappointing that this question was asked and then seemingly immediately forgotten about... – Cerbrus Mar 10 at 10:59
  • @Cerbrus I haven't forgotten about it. I just realized after reading your answer, and the voting and the lack of any other response, it was pointless. – Richard Chambers Mar 11 at 13:53
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I'm the user that reverted a few of the edits.

I've tried to get your attention on one of the posts you edited, as you can see in the comment you screengrabbed. Since I got no response on that, a mod flag seemed to be the only possible action. As for the moderator flag, it's currently pending:

enter image description here

The reason I reverted these edits is because in my opinion, most of them added a lot of noise to the tag wikis.

In the case you screengrabbed, you added to a question that wasn't discussing the code of conduct. An old question at that. When old questions get updated (incorrectly), I tend to dig a little deeper. That's when I found 5 pages of meta tag revisions (That's about 65 tags) on your profile over the last month, with no prior revision history. To me, that looks suspicious, and reason enough to dig a little deeper.

For example:

  • On deleted-questions, you added a long list of barely related tags. reputation and badges? licensing, code-of-conduct, moderators? You bring up the "DRY" principle, but I don't see how that applies to adding a load of tags to the wikis of even more tags.

I don't see the added value of linking to a load of other tags, in the tag wiki. It's like googling for "car" and it asking you "Did you mean "bicycle"?"

Those are 2 of the 3-4 mandatory tags. I don't see the added value of that line.

  • You consistently write the common phrase "See also" as "See as well".

This is admittedly a personal preference, but for me it weighs against the edit.

Now, to answer your questions:

Why can a single person arbitrarily revert changes that have gone through a review just because they object to changes?

It's possible because of my rep, and the review process isn't flawless. "Reviewed" edits aren't "locked" or anything like that, because reviewers do make mistakes from time to time.

When can a meta tag wiki be updated and under what conditions can a user suggest an edit?

They always can.
The only footnote I'd add here is that, on a scale like you've been doing, I'd suggest discussing it with the community, first.

How often can a user update the meta tag wiki and how many suggested edits can a user make per day?

This isn't something we can really pin a number on. If it's a single occurrence, it's probably fine. If it's a systematic change, you're probably better off discussing it first.

What criteria should a user use to determine that a suggested edit that has been approved should be reverted?

Basically, if they look at the edit and disagree it's an improvement... There's quite a lot more that goes into it, mostly covered in the help center.

How would I know what moderator action has been taken and how any such action has affected my account and the edits I have made in the meta tag wiki?

If an action was taken that affects you, you would know. Possibly from a moderator message, or in extreme cases by restrictions placed on the account.

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    When I started making edits to tag wikis, it also seemed like a good idea to add a "relevant tags" section - but since then I changed my mind: we have a native "related tags" sidebar (which, ironically, means that such additions violate DRY), and the tags can be renamed, synonymized, burninated, etc - which adds an unnecessary maintenance cost to wikis referencing such tags. – Oleg Valter Mar 6 at 14:05

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