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The comments and answers on many proposals to change the way voting works on Stack Overflow indicate there are strong opinions against many of these changes, mainly because such proposals alter the way downvotes can be used in various ways. Most such proposals to voting either restrict or remove downvotes from the system.

Why is there such disagreement when the concept of changing downvotes is raised?


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    Trying to imitate meta.stackoverflow.com/q/357436/792066 to list common reasons why proposals are met with strong disagreements. Lets see if it helps. – Braiam Mar 2 at 10:18
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    Excuse me, folks, but why somebody wants to close this as "needs details or clarity"? This is a FAQ-style self-answered question that is perfectly in line with how other meta FAQ entries look like. – Oleg Valter Mar 2 at 12:34
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    @Tomerikoo - I guess it would be beneficial to separate the FAQ on "why feedback is not necessary" and the FAQ on "why downvotes are a part of the content rating system" of SO. While the first one highlights one of the problems with voting (regardless of whether or not it is adequately solved), it does not question the downvoting as such. But, admittedly, a few posts do question the merits of downvoting per se, so I think it is time we have a FAQ on that (granted, the are bound to be some intersecting points) – Oleg Valter Mar 2 at 13:54
  • @Useless any improvement that limits or removes the downvotes. That's already included in the "because it somehow alters the way that downvotes can be used". – Braiam Mar 2 at 14:12
  • @ilkkachu self answered questions are still bound to the quality standards. You should be able to answer this question as is. If you can't, then explain why you believe you can't, or edit the question to make it better. – Braiam Mar 2 at 17:41
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    I don't really get the slack the question is getting right now - isn't the whole point of FAQ questions to be concise statements of hypothetical situations not tied to any particular post/tag/user/whatever. The only thing I would change about how it is currently worded is to rephrase the last part as "why downvotes are considered to be an important part of the voting system" instead to avoid being seen as asking to speculate about why people disagree with such proposals. – Oleg Valter Mar 2 at 17:49
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    @MisterMiyagi This question also says "my", nobody claims that is unclear. It's asking about a situation, but if that's your only complain, I can edit it to remove pronouns, but the situation remains. – Braiam Mar 2 at 18:11
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    I'm starting to believe FAQ stands for "Frequently Answered Questions", at this point... – Cerbrus Mar 4 at 14:00
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    @LuisMendo - isn't the most recent one that started all this one such "proposal"? Not sure about the other ones, since it is likely a lot of them are deleted (which is a subject of the parallel discussion) – Oleg Valter Mar 4 at 16:07
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    @OlegValter Thanks! I didn't know about it – Luis Mendo Mar 4 at 16:09
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    @OlegValter You’re right: you could try to keep up with everything, as I’m doing right now. I have a queue of comments to upvote, since I’m constantly running out of daily votes. I have several answers and comments yet to read. All the while keeping up with the outdated answers project. I don’t know why I like to follow drama this much… 🤷‍♂️ – Sebastian Simon Mar 4 at 17:16
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    I clicked on this accidentally and is a bit shocked how many people not on some tiktok but here on SO want to remove downvotes because they simple doesn't know how to treat them. A downvote is a way to mark that a post is not useful. A signal that it needs improvement. Yes, downvote is embarassing a bit because that means our shiny post isn't really as shiny as we thought. But it's not a personal threat. It's a completely different question if some concrete people use it like that but is the bread knife guilty if someone use it for harm purposes? My 2 cents on this, no offence. – Andrii M4n0w4R Mar 5 at 13:01
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    @AndriiM4n0w4R - well, the core of the whole debate is exactly the showdown between "feelings" and "curation". The far-left side says "to hell with curation if it hurts so much", the far-right - "to hell with feelings, curation justifies it". If one looks closely, they will notice this is a utilitarianism vs personalism debate. The issue is not helped by the former being the "silent majority", while the latter are the "vocal minority" as periodically a disgruntled user goes to meta and posts a disguised (or not-so) rant on abolishing downvotes, which surely triggers the rest (me included). – Oleg Valter Mar 5 at 14:48
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    Can you folks please stop adding political subtext to this? Comparing this to a "political issue", or identifying stances as "far-left" or "far-right" feels very out of place and implies some rather unpleasant, inappropriate things. – MisterMiyagi Mar 5 at 14:51
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There are many reasons, but from having read many different meta posts from all over the network of Stack Exchange sites, including Meta Stack Exchange, there are several themes of the reasons for disagreements:

  • Already heard arguments for an already heard change: since the sites existed, downvotes existed, and thus discussions about how to improve them. These proposals have been discussed for years and discussed from many angles. Discussing the same arguments, with the same solution and rehashing the same counter-arguments have gotten tiresome over the years. Whatever proposal you may have, you must research years of these discussions and show that you considered those discussions. Remember to read questions with all answers and comments.

  • Painting voters in a negative light: this can be included in the above, but it comes so frequently and generates the strongest negative response that it deserves its own bullet point. People respond poorly to being painted as lazy, malicious, or with any other negative attribute. Voters are asked to give their honest opinion about posts, but when told that their honest opinion is nothing short of malicious or lazy or vindictive or petty, etc., they reject that outright. Imagine that for every action you do, thinking that you are doing right by the community, you are told that you are just doing it out of pettiness.

  • Despite all its faults, the site has been successful: you need to bring strong evidence that the current system around voting is jeopardizing the site, that can't be attributed to...

  • Voting, in general, isn't done enough: any limiting requirement has to take into consideration that for the model to work, frequent and early voting is essential. It's the only way that the system has to rate content.

  • There's one rule on voting: don't target users. It's the only rule enforced by the system itself. If you aren't targeting a user, the system will let you vote however you like.

  • And yet, voters vote on content: they try to collectively vote for the content itself, despite not being forced to. Users without accounts do the same since they are allowed to vote also, vote more frequently and are usually more critical of content. Presuming other reasons, dooms almost any argument about voting, since this is their purpose.

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    I tried to list the most important common themes. If I missed one, incorporate it into the post. – Braiam Mar 2 at 10:17
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    One problem i find with a lot of posts where people want to "fix" the "toxicity" (uncited) of downvotes to make the site more "welcoming" is it's often (so not always) one sided against those downvotes, and doesn't address other "problems" that exist with the voting system, including upvotes. For example, they should also be addressing the problem of "welcoming" votes, which only serve to bubble crap to the top of the pile (uncited). They should probably address the "meta effect" as well, and anything else that they can think of. – Larnu Mar 2 at 11:01
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    @computercarguy - excuse me, but how the consistency of voting is relevant to the point about people not liking being called "lazy", "malicious", "trolls", "unfriendly", "hostile", "toxic" and "cowards" (all cited per actual posts)? Not once in my life have I cast a vote without reading the post, or giving the poster the benefit of the doubt. My UV/DV ratio is 4.82 - and yet I find myself on the side of those who defend DV as a practice for 2 reasons: A. I see how voters are unjustly vilified. B. I am yet to see any suggestion of improvement rather than "I don't like it, let's abolish it". – Oleg Valter Mar 3 at 1:02
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    voting does need a revamp, what it does not need is yet another accusation of being completely useless, harmful, and wielded by egotistical maniacs. Can we please stop mixing the problems of the voting system and half-baked attempts to vent some frustration on how one's posts have been received? I would love to have a nice discussion on possible changes to the voting system, there is a lot to talk about. – Oleg Valter Mar 3 at 1:09
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    @computercarguy Sure, people do respond negatively to that, but a major reason why we have downvotes is so you can express a negative opinion without being insulting. Much content is legitimately low quality, and it's nigh impossible to express the problem in words without the author taking it personally. That ought to be obvious by the fact so many people take downvotes (which don't contain such words) personally. At some point, you have to accept that some people (a lot of people) are going to feel bad when we do quality control, and you have to pick either quality of positive feelings. – jpmc26 Mar 3 at 17:48
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    @computercarguy Just a note "but I've seen people that have DVed 2-3x as many times as they UV" there are only 10k users that have more downvotes than upvotes, meanwhile there are 355k users in the opposite way and this excludes users that haven't downvoted once. – Braiam Mar 3 at 17:49
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    @computercarguy at least is better than "but I've seen people that have DVed 2-3x as many times as they UV" which is purely anecdotal. Please, substain your affirmations with data. This discussion is very inflammatory to begin with, but you are already calling for actions against "problem users". Bring data that demonstrate that it is a problem, not just observations. – Braiam Mar 4 at 1:34
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    @computercarguy You appear biased towards seeing people have more upvotes than downvotes. While it is concerning when the ratio between upvotes and downvotes is at the far extremes toward either side (and there are a lot of votes), there isn't a demarcation point where one ratio or another is good or bad. People use the site in different ways. They encounter different posts. Those users who are focusing on curation see a far higher percentage of poor quality posts than those who are just asking or answering questions, or who are just searching for answers, so more downvotes is "normal". – Makyen Mar 4 at 4:40
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    From what I've seen in these comments, and elsewhere where people discuss upvote/downvote ratios, both the vast majority of people and the numbers which are often stated as "good", "bad", or "normal", are heavily biased towards the ideal the person who's presenting the number has for how the site should be used, rather than looking at it with the understanding that the way which they experience and use the site is not the same as how every other person experiences and uses the site. There is no one "right" or "good" ratio, or even a narrow range of ratios which are "good", or "bad". – Makyen Mar 4 at 4:40
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    What this answer somehow misses is that it isn't downvotes that are needed -- they are a necessary evil. Its curating content thats needed. If someone can come up with a scheme that still allows content curation, but without downvotes, that would be worth exploring. But it needs to be well thought out and needs to be better then downvotes in order to replace them. But most discussions about downvotes are met with resistance not because we love downvotes -- but because the proposal would destroy the ability to curate content, and that is the ability that must be preserved - not downvotes. – Polygnome Mar 4 at 15:13
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    @Polygnome I'm not sure "necessary evil" is a good way of phrasing it. If I'm offered tea or coffee and express my desire for tea, that's not subjecting coffee to "necessary evil". When I order my socks drawer with my favourite pair on top, I'm also not subjecting the rest of the socks to evil. This is simply how things are - when ordering items by some criteria, some need to go down the list. Assigning moral judgement of any form is when and why friction arises. I'd agree that there might be a better system that leads to less friction. Just don't want to further fuel the fire against this one – VLAZ Mar 4 at 16:04
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    @computercarguy - let's separate meta and main voting patterns. Meta voting is like that because we do not have any other way to express agreement/disagreement with the poster. This is the limitation of the software we are using, not an indication of the voting inconsistency. Let's also separate close/delete and up/down voting - they are separate patterns, and while the question/answer can be upvoted, it can be closed/reopened. Let's also understand that posts are exposed to a huge number of different people with different views, levels of competency, tolerance and social skills. [1/2] – Oleg Valter Mar 4 at 17:14
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    [2/2] What is your experience with the site may not be the experience of others, so let us not extrapolate what we personally perceive is the case to the system as a whole. Voting is also influenced by the popularity of the tags and the general level of competence there (I already mentioned it). Frankly, any voting system suffers from that flaw. – Oleg Valter Mar 4 at 17:20
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    "you must research years of these discussions and show that you considered those discussions. ... read questions with all answers and comments." - this is just completely unreasonable. Before posting a question you should do a Google search or two and quickly scan a few results. This is going to answer most questions if you're even remotely competent. You should not need to spend many hours reading through how-many-ever pages in full. If that's the only way to find the answer, then it means it's extremely poorly organised and the burden is on anyone who objects to these questions to fix it – NotThatGuy Mar 4 at 19:19
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    Is there any resource with links to all the discussions on downvotes and the main arguments and counterarguments? If not, is there anyone who would be willing to pull together a wiki of sorts for this? It would make it much easier for people to know exactly what research needs to be done before they should contribute their ideas. – Pro Q Mar 5 at 1:15
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So, you are here because you proposed some change to voting, especially proposed to limit or remove downvoting at all, and you got a strong negative reaction from the meta community, probably lots of downvotes and maybe close and delete votes as well and you want to know why?

Downvotes are important for content selection

Additionally to the answer by Braiam I think I can give you some important insight and I think that this insight is that if you speak about downvotes you absolutely must be aware of the impact of downvotes on content selection. Downvotes on the main sites effectively suppress bad content and that is such a useful feature, maybe the main feature of downvotes and without alternative. It's extremely important especially if you are curating the content, i.e. managing and organizing it.

How do downvotes select content?

How is this achieved? Downvotes directly only influence the number that is displayed next to a contribution, but that again influences other things. The default sort order is a ranking of that number and top ranked contributions get much more attention, bottom ranked contributions much less. Readers typically are biased by the number, i.e. take it as a prior quality/popularity assessment. A negative score can lead to automatic removal of content and a lowered score also lowers reputation, which can lead to a loss of privileges even up to the ability to ask further questions. Downvotes have arguably a deterrent effect on the amount of future content creation.

Active users on meta are managing content using downvotes and love them

Active users on meta are organizing and managing the content of Stack Overflow much more likely than the average user and there is lots of bad (low quality) content produced every day and downvotes are very useful in suppressing this bad content. Naturally, it will be a beloved feature here.

If there was no bad content or somebody else would manage the content...

If there was an alternative way to suppress bad content (a secret algorithm maybe like the Google search algorithm that simply decides what is good and what is not) or if there was only good content produced because people would put an awful lot of carefulness into the preparation of their content, maybe people would see the need for downvotes less, but such things do not exist currently.

It's still a compromise

Yes, people here know about the downsides of downvotes, mistakes in voting, negative feelings when you receive some, which might lower motivation of contributors that could otherwise contribute useful content, but the general idea is that the benefits by far outweigh the disadvantages.

How to really propose changes about downvotes

So, if you think something should be done about downvotes and want to present the idea here, you better gather a lot of eloquent arguments, do a great amount of research before (to not just repeat what others have said before), are open to discussions and learning from others and come with modesty. And even then it will be an uphill battle.

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    @Cerbrus Yes, it's a bit long for mainly only a single point. I tried to make it more readable by adding section headers. – Trilarion Mar 4 at 10:13
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    That's much better :D – Cerbrus Mar 4 at 10:13
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    @Braiam More like "Why people around here love downvotes", which is probably the first step to understand why a possible change proposal hasn't worked. It was also designed to give an idea how to make a better proposal next time. A better proposal would probably explain how people can achieve what they want to alternatively. – Trilarion Mar 4 at 13:51
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    We don't need downvotes, let's just show both of the current votes, the upvotes with a header "This question/answer is useful" and the downvotes with a header "This question/answer is not useful". Both would have positive number, no negative votes can be seen anymore, and everybody will be happy ... Then we also would have two reps, one for useful posts, and another for not useful posts, both always above zero. Everything under the hood would work like it always has worked, only that you can't see any negative scores on the site. – Teemu Mar 4 at 18:36
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    @Teemu - an interesting take on the psychology of voting, I think it actually can help, because it certainly seems like the side that wants to abolish downvoting talks more about feelings DVs incite, and the other side appeals to curation needs. The situation is not helped since we are conditioned to think "green is good, red is bad", "addition is good, subtraction is bad" throughout our lives, and not only rep is deduced for being downvoted, it is also colored red. It is also a relatively cheap solution which makes it more likely to actually be implemented – Oleg Valter Mar 4 at 18:45
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    @Oleg Both of the numbers shown in neutral grey, of course. Then we could also see hilarious comments like: "I'm voting up this post in the category of not useful". – Teemu Mar 4 at 18:53
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    @Teemu - certainly hilarious :) Joking aside, this form already feels more lighthearted and less confrontational (which, I guess, is one of the main reasons for the whole drama around downvotes) - although I am sure people will find a way to become upset about anything. – Oleg Valter Mar 4 at 19:33
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    @Teemu "Everything under the hood would work like it always has worked, only that you can't see any negative scores on the site." Would help those that are allergic to negative numbers, but otherwise it wouldn't take very long before people would mentally add the minus sign. A more serious proposal might be to for example not show the score below a certain threshold, say -1 on the main sites. Who really cares if a question or answer is at minus 10 or minutes 20, it's dead anyway. – Trilarion Mar 4 at 19:42
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    @Trilarion - true, not a silver bullet by any means. Not "kicking a dead horse" should also help, especially if combined with the above. It both caters to the content curation side since votes are still recorded and to the "feelings" side since users do not plummet into the abyss of peer disapproval. With improvements to onboarding and the overall guidance, this could very well lead to a positive change for a change (pun intended). – Oleg Valter Mar 4 at 20:01
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    @Trilarion That is an option too (wasn't it even tested on the site a couple of years ago?). But when having two reps, you could see the all time "positive" rep you've earned, the "negative" doesn't even have to be public, it could be placed in the private data shown on the Profile page. That might keep a new user in good mood, when their hard-work-earned rep doesn't just vanish because of a single poor question. – Teemu Mar 4 at 20:07
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    [2,2] My stomach turns a little at the thought of a community run site having some secret algorithm determining content quality on our behalf. We know that visibility and engagement are key for the health of meta and stack* . Who else should curate the content we rely on and contribute to? And in many cases, care about? You'd never afford the staffing to manage the current workload, and back to line one re:algos. – QHarr Mar 4 at 21:09
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    @Trilarion how do you propose to visualize Reps in a clear way then? Not the number .- but the reasoning why User A is allowed to do X and User B is not allowed to do X because well - User B has far more less usefull posts so the rep he has is lower and hence his interaction possibilities are different. And frankly there is a difference between a -1 post and a -8 post, especially for fresh content which we want to curate. If a post collects 8 DV in the same timespan others collect 1 (maybe driveby, whatever) it tells you loads about the question or answer. – Patrick Artner Mar 5 at 6:31
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    @QHarr "Who else should curate the content we rely on and contribute to?" I agree with you, I feel safest with the current method. But I'm also programmer enough to dislike manual work and inventing algorithms to replace that work fully or partly has a certain appeal. Anyway, most of the visitors to Stack Overflow come through search engines and they may or may not regard the numbers printed next to the content. We keep duplicates because they are search magnets. If score and number of visits correlate, they might be exchangeable. I don't think we should stop voting though. – Trilarion Mar 5 at 17:47
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    @PatrickArtner "If a post collects 8 DV in the same timespan others collect 1..." A score of -1 is sometimes repairable, i.e. if the question has a minor flaw, which gets repaired, it can make the turnaround. The difference between score -7 and score -8 is negligible, the question is dead. The idea here was simply to replace the display of scores smaller than say -1 with "<-1" because there isn't much useful signal contained in these numbers. It would be pure cosmetics and as such maybe the smallest possible change. Even that already feels like a big leap, doesn't it. – Trilarion Mar 5 at 17:56
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    @Trilarion SE/SO ran an experiment about a year and a half ago(?) with limiting the displayed score to basically what you're talking about. I'd suggest you search here on MSO to find the various posts describing what was done and the results. – Makyen Mar 5 at 19:29
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Many of such proposals miss or ignore the purpose of downvoting and the purpose of the whole site.

Purpose of the site

The goal SO aims is that once you isolate and describe the problem you are facing, a search will show an already asked question with your problem stated (asked by someone who had similar problem earlier) and that question will already have answers that fit you.

Purpose of voting

Not all users put the same effort to isolate the problem and search for solution. So there are probably many questions with similar problem, some of them better worded, some of them a bit unclear. Also each one may have multiple answers, some of them more useful, some less useful, some even harmful. You don't want to read all of them and evaluate each answer. You need some content rating. And on SO this is done by voting. Those, who read an answer and find it useful, upvote it (at least some of readers do it). Those, who find some answer not useful, downvote them. If a problem is stated in two questions and one of them is poorly worded and unclear, it will get downvoted and the other one upvoted, encouraging answerers to answer the question with better quality 1. As a result there is a chance that you will have to read one question with few good answers sorted at the top, instead of gazilion questions each having gazilion answers, all with unknown quality.

Back to your proposal

If the proposal does not address above purposes and does not explain how to achieve them in different way, it will not be received positively.
If you disagree with above purposes or don't think they are important, you should start discussion about this first, not start discussion about downvotes that assume those purposes are not important.
If you suggest some better way to achieve content rating, without using downvotes, I believe your proposal will be better received.


1 In fact one of the questions should be closed as a duplicate of the other, but it is a separate process.

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  • Interesting that this answer tries to give "Purpose of the site" which isn't very similar to "create a library of high quality programming questions" – Braiam Mar 4 at 15:32
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    @Braiam - well, the core still seems to be there, maybe it will be more understandable to the target audience of such a FAQ entry (after all, what else library is for if not to be useful to others) as (probably) curators should already have this goal as an axiom – Oleg Valter Mar 4 at 18:49
  • @SebastianSimon Is it now better? Feel free to improve if you have ideas. English is not my native language. – Tadeusz Kopec Mar 5 at 7:29
  • @TadeuszKopec Neither is it mine. 😉 It’s good now. – Sebastian Simon Mar 5 at 8:34
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I can summarise it as such: don't create meta posts in the form of "downvotes bad, people hate them, remove them".

At least... not yet. It is too soon. And that is not specifically to do with downvotes either but any existing system; they were all designed with a purpose in mind, a problem to solve. They were not created just to hinder and annoy people. They were not created by stupid people who did not know what they were doing, quite the contrary.

Fact of the matter is that despite its overwhelming success, Stack Overflow is not a self-sustaining knowledge base; it needs a lot of human intervention, unfortunately. Curation and content rating being the two usual suspects, they make or break the success of this site which is that you can find answers to questions or to find questions to answer. And for that to keep happening now and in the future, good, relevant questions and answers need to be first in line in search results. Good questions need to be answered and bad questions need to be either fixed or go somewhere else. For good questions to be answered they need to be not hidden away behind a mountain of bad questions.

And therein lies the problem; before you can open a narrative about restricting or removing features which allow that curation and/or content rating, the self-sustainability needs to be drastically improved first. Hence why I say: too soon, Don't sell the hide before the bear is shot. Any ideas on how to do that in particular can be very welcome indeed. If you want a Stack Overflow without downvotes then you will need to design a Stack Overflow where it is possible to have no downvoting while you can still find good answers to questions, or find good questions to answer. That is likely not going to happen in one sweep, it'll need to happen in smaller improvement steps; steps we can comprehend, agree on, measure and tweak if necessary.

But which steps? Or maybe back up one step further... what do we need to know to be able to define those steps? Good questions. Hard questions.

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    Side note: Although I value the existing answers, to me they focus a little too much on explaining yet again why voting exists and is necessary. I thought I'd take a slightly different approach, as an addendum to that valuable information. – Gimby Mar 5 at 8:44
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Why is there such disagreement when the concept of changing downvotes is raised?

Part of it is because the identity of the site is rooted in those initial mechanics including downvotes.

If you've spent the last 13 years downvoting and believing downvotes solve problems, of course you're going to be upset when someone says "They cause more problems than they solve, and therefore should be eliminated".

This is exactly the sort of political issue that won't be solved through reason; and that makes any discussion about it difficult to have.

There's 13 years of inertia around the idea that downvotes are a requirement, and that's going to create a stiff headwind towards any discussion on changing that.

Another part of it is a lack of frame of reference for a better approach. Downvoting meets a need that people have; and there's not yet been a suggestion that allays the downvoter advocates' fears; and therefore the effect is "we can't possibly continue to discuss this since this is the best there is".

We're getting meta-meta at this point, talking about the problem with talking about the problem; but these are the sorts of conversations a community needs to be able to have, because the conversation here will shape how we talk about the problems (like downvoting) going forward.

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    There is only one issue I have with the post - it is overtly biased against downvoting as it is worded right now and would benefit from a more neutral point of view (only in the scope of providing input on why such proposals are met with harsh disagreement). That said, these proposals do seem to hit a nerve, and not in the least because the practice has been around for more than a decade usually without bringing forth anything that would take the best of both worlds: keep the benefits and avoid the pitfalls of downvoting. – Oleg Valter Mar 2 at 18:51
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    If after 13 years one of the fundamental governing principles of the site is still not understood (slightly different from accepted), it feels to me like a severe communication failure from SO. – QHarr Mar 2 at 21:12
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    Evidence against this theory: you'll never see an argument for why downvoting is not useful, only the argument that a user believes it's not useful and therefore it should be abolished. See what I did there? Both are statements that require data and arguments to be substantiated, they are not axioms. Also: 1, 2, 3, 4. These are from spending 5 mins to look for. True, those who [1/2] – Oleg Valter Mar 3 at 1:27
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    [2/2] believe downvotes are useful are not the whole community. But the same is true on the other hand - the other party is also not representative of the whole community. This is why it is important to have productive discussions about the voting systems every once in a while (hell, I think even decoloring the downvotes will go a long way in making them feel not "unwelcoming"), but it is also important to differentiate between those that have potential to bring change from those that do not have one from the get-go. – Oleg Valter Mar 3 at 1:34
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    "This is exactly the sort of political issue that won't be solved through reason; and that makes any discussion about it difficult to have." This is insulting and toxic. You're essentially declaring your opponents to be irrational, despite the fact that many solid arguments about the benefits of downvoting have been given over the years. Perhaps it is that attitude, which seeks to ignore when your detractors have a point, that is creating problems. – jpmc26 Mar 3 at 8:00
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    gnat looking at site traffic stats saying "11m visits/day". Hmmm if this is inertia then it seems to be of the kind worth keeping – gnat Mar 3 at 8:55
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    @GeorgeStocker - no one is saying the issue is not political. What is argued is that you have an incorrect notion of what "a political issue" means by reducing it to "sentiment" checks and whim of those "who's in power". Frankly, it is a bit insulting to be considered so out of touch to not get that "in real life" there is no such thing as pure "hard fact or data". What is desirable is to have an educated and reasonable discussion, which is not helped by rehashing the same on both sides. If all we want to measure "sentiments", we can run a poll without spending days on end arguing. – Oleg Valter Mar 3 at 15:13
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    @GeorgeStocker If you feel you have been misunderstood, the traditional response on SO is to edit your content to clarify. That said, your comment constitutes a general argument against having any discussion of the issue at all. If it's correct, then there is nothing to be gained by debating the merits or drawbacks of the feature on Meta, as only the whims of the company matter, and any post doing so ought to be deleted as a drama creating waste of time. – jpmc26 Mar 3 at 17:34
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    I reject the premise that we're doing anyone any favors by coddling them with a lack of negative feedback. I also have seen nothing, and I mean nothing, in any discussion of this topic that would indicate that we can effectively enforce norms without it. Not even a fig leaf of wishful thinking a la "it'll work itself out". Instead, it always seems to be an attack on the norms themselves. That's why people get so heated about this, we are in effect being told "your culture is wrong". Which is about as well received as one would expect. – Jared Smith Mar 3 at 22:22
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    @JaredSmith "..we can [not] effectively enforce norms without it..." Good point. Any discussion would have to start with what are the best ways to enforce norms. This should then be ontopic. Maybe we can learn from parenting. Bringing kids to obey norms is an established problem and afaik penalties alone do not result in the best outcome. Guidance, being a good example, .. also plays a role. Maybe we should think about DVs on a more fundamental level as part of an integrated strategy to achieve our goal. – Trilarion Mar 3 at 22:38
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    @Trilarion agreed. I would be all for a DV alternative that preserved the things DVs are supposed to preserve. And per this answer, maybe DVs have outlived their time and their usefulness, but I never see it broached from a perspective of what would serve the function they were intended to serve. Just "oh noes, the downvotes hurt my tiny little feelings, so since the problem obviously can't be with me they must just all be toxic cowardly malicious jerks". – Jared Smith Mar 3 at 22:54
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    I mean, Facebook and Twitter have lately single handedly banned thousands of accounts, content creators and stuff because they were wreaking havoc with disinformation. I would bet that, have there been a way to downvote content on either of those platform, that would have been mitigated by the very users of those platforms. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 4 at 15:37
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    FWIW, apparently it's still necessary to dump this on twitter, out of context, where we can't defend ourselves, unless we're specifically stalking george there. (@jpmc26) – Cerbrus Mar 5 at 10:35
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    @GeorgeStocker I don't appreciate being pilloried on a platform I don't even belong to and that is well known for generating outrage by people who have so little understanding of SO's platform that they actually believe its model to be racist. I wasn't upset that you called it a "political issue." I was upset that you appeared to be calling others unreasonable for supporting the downvote feature, and it appears I wasn't the only one who thought that's what you meant. I don't like the bad faith assumption that the only reason people do so is because we've been doing it a long time, either. – jpmc26 Mar 5 at 12:52
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    @GeorgeStocker - albeit I wouldn't phrase that so harshly, in the tweet you do seem to misrepresent the issue the comment takes with your quote as the issue with "calling something a political issue", while the objected part is with the "that won't be solved through reason" part. As already mentioned multiple times, no one (at least I hope) is arguing the issue is not political, it is argued that political issues can and should be reasoned about without devolving into sentiment analysis – Oleg Valter Mar 5 at 14:26

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