9

I asked a technical but precise post about how C++ handles certain regular expressions, What is the position of an unmatched group in C++? . The post was answered by https://stackoverflow.com/users/3807729/galik . It turned out the most common reference that C++ users use, http://cppreference.com , was missing the information I needed, but Galik found the answer in the standard, so this answer can be used to improve that cppreference.

So the post and answer were both useful, so useful it will might help improve a major reference. There seems no reason to delete the post.

Two of the three users who voted to delete the post seem to have no particular interest in C++, at least it is not in their profiles and I could not find any C++ questions they ever answered.

Why is a precise, useful, on-topic post that elicited a lacuna in a major C++ reference by a top C++ contributor deleted?

43
  • 4
    I mean, it's not for the op to decide what is or isn't useful, so forgive me for not taking your word for it. The voting seems to be... contested (+3, then -4 over a 9 day period leading up to deletion) – Kevin B Feb 16 at 17:10
  • 5
    "I could not find any C++ questions they ever answered." Really? One of them has answered 194 C++ questions. – Ryan M Feb 16 at 17:12
  • 14
    I agree that it's not obvious why this question was deleted, but can you please tone down the speech against non-C++-people? This person not very familiar with C++ can assure you that "But my question wouldn’t make sense to anyone who is not already very familiar with C++." is blatantly false. – MisterMiyagi Feb 16 at 17:13
  • 7
    All of that said...I agree this post should not have been deleted. It seems to be clear and have a useful answer. I would vote to undelete unless a reason that it's bad is given. – Ryan M Feb 16 at 17:14
  • 13
    Focus less on the users and more on the post. It's more likely you'll get a productive experience that way. – yivi Feb 16 at 17:21
  • 7
    c++ isn't the only tag on the question, and tags aren't the only way questions are found – Kevin B Feb 16 at 17:26
  • 2
    Look, can anyone give a single reasonable reason why anyone, C++ or non-C++ user, could possibly have voted to delete the question? You combine that with the fact that 2/3 of the voters probably have no interest in C++ - this all seems like possibly an indication of a more fundamental problem, at least if it is happening to others. Are other users going around deleting posts in areas they do not have expertise in for no reason (if that is what is happening here, and nobody has provided any evidence it is not). – kdog Feb 16 at 17:31
  • 2
    My guess would be that they disliked that an answer could potentially be obtained by simply running the code. But this doesn't answer what the spec requires, so I would disagree with that logic, if it is in fact the logic behind it. – Ryan M Feb 16 at 17:40
  • 3
    It's a good question, and the closure as "unclear" seems strange; I found it clear enough myself. I certainly don't think it deserved to be deleted. I have guesses as to why the question was closed and deleted, but I'm frustrated that I have to guess at all. It would have been really nice if at least one of the close/delete voters had left a comment explaining their rationale, but they don't appear to have done so (at least from the visible comments). – cigien Feb 16 at 17:43
  • 3
    @cigien Do they expect us to read the minds of the delete voters? I know what they want, but I don't know what they want to happen. – John Montgomery Feb 16 at 18:40
  • 4
    @kdog if you don't want people outside of C++ to know about the question please do not tag with additional tags. Regex is a tag with couple followers too and when you demand those people to look at the question by adding the tag then don't complain their looked at/acted on the post. – Alexei Levenkov Feb 16 at 18:51
  • 4
    @cigien this is exactly what OP complains about - one of the top SME of the regex tag acted on the OP's post tagged with "regex"... – Alexei Levenkov Feb 16 at 19:05
  • 3
    @kdog you may or may not be aware of the existence of "Review Queues". You can access it in the top navigation by clicking the icon of the box with the checkmark on top. The site relies on review queues to help moderate the vast amount of posts. Users who volunteer can go there and are presented with posts meeting different criteria (first time posters, suggested edits, etc.). They can vote to take an action such as deletion, closing, reopening, etc. So they probably didn't "go out of their way to delete the question". They merely saw it pop up in their review and voted to delete. – Kodos Johnson Feb 16 at 19:09
  • 5
    @cigien OP is complaining that non-C++ experts acted on the question. The question that wasn't brought to the attention of C++ experts only. Moreover, if the question is indeed so tightly related with C++ itself as to only rely on the specs of it, then it doesn't sound like regex knowledge helps there. It seems that OP believes it's a C++ question, related to C++ specifications and implementations and it happens to mention regex. But the last part seems irrelevant to understanding or answering the question. You could have the same situation with arithmetic or other implementations. – VLAZ Feb 16 at 19:13
  • 5
    @cigien it's less pointing fault, and more... avoiding such. Whether or not the users were wrong doesn't really seem to be important. People voted, as they are allowed to do, and the community is free to overturn those votes. that's simply how it works, we don't need to chase down these users and get an answer. There doesn't need to be an at fault at all. – Kevin B Feb 17 at 2:05
22

I'm going to dodge the main thrust of the question; it doesn't matter if someone doesn't have experience in the technology to moderate and close questions. If they can't understand the premise of the question in general (that is, assuming that they're technically competent but can't understand the nature of the ask), then it's fair game for anyone to close a question.

That said I do want to call out this pattern that's been pretty popular as of late on Stack Overflow. Question closure exists as a way for the OP to come back to fix problems or deficiencies with the question. Question deletion exists to remove content which is irredeemable and unsalvageable from public view. Closing and deleting the question within mere minutes of each other is an anti-pattern that means that OPs don't have a chance to reach for the alleged olive branch that we're giving them in the first place with question closure.

To be blunt I saw no reason for the question to be closed. I don't understand C++ all that well, but I didn't see anything in the question to immediately raise a red flag, either. You ask a tight, specifically referenceable, "Hey I can't find an answer here; does anyone else have an idea??"-style question which shows that you've done your homework enough that any C++ expert should feel comfortable with filling in the gaps.

19
  • 2
    "Closing and deleting the question within mere minutes of each other" how? Are we seeing the same question? It was deleted several days after, so there was plenty of time for the OP to fix it. Also, even then, OP has by default 2 days unless it has a score of -2 or less, so in any case that statement has no basis on reality. – Braiam Feb 16 at 23:19
  • @Makoto If a question tagged C++ and <regex> should be understandable by people who do not know C++, should it also be understandable by people who do not know regex? Should I have included an introduction explaining what regexes, what capturing groups are, and how C++ handles them? Such a policy would make questions much longer and more difficult to read, and would cut against the utility of the site. – kdog Feb 17 at 1:25
  • 1
    @Braiam what do you mean “fix”? There was nothing to fix in the question. That’s the gravamen of the whole discussion here. – kdog Feb 17 at 1:28
  • @kdog When I read the posted question, I see several issues that should be corrected and a bit of rewrite to make the question better beginning with the title. – Richard Chambers Feb 17 at 2:39
  • 7
    @kdog Your question is understandable by people with only passing knowledge of C++ and regex. Please don't focus on that so much. It only distracts from the issue that even someone who is not an expert should not have closed and deleted the question. – MisterMiyagi Feb 17 at 6:33
  • 1
    @kdog Makoto's argument is that the author of the question weren't give enough time to "come back to fix problems or deficiencies with the question". I'm saying that the author did have such time. – Braiam Feb 17 at 11:56
  • The edit history shows post created Feb 2, post closed Feb 3, post deleted Feb 12 with no changes within more than a week from post closed to post deleted. – Richard Chambers Feb 17 at 12:54
  • 2
    Let's not focus on time too much. The point is, the close and delete happened without the OP having a chance to fix the question – because it was entirely unclear what to fix about it. – MisterMiyagi Feb 17 at 13:06
  • 2
    @MisterMiyagi they had plenty of time, as did anyone who wanted to keep the question around. the answerer could have edited it, or cast a reopen vote, any 3 random people who passed by could have reopened it in that 9 day period, it could have been opened in the review queue during that 9 day period, but none of that happened. That's not a very good look for a question that is "useful", you'd think something that was useful would get some attention – Kevin B Feb 17 at 15:29
  • 2
    @KevinB I cannot comment on the C++ tag, but if it is anything even remotely close to the Python tag then "useful" and "attention" are almost entirely uncorrelated. Either some experienced person adopts the questions (e.g. follows) quickly, or it just drowns in the noise. There is way too much crap to accurately find, let alone properly handle, the pearls in it. – MisterMiyagi Feb 17 at 15:35
  • 2
    and... a question asking for an answer that's in the standard is a pearl? it's a curiosity at best – Kevin B Feb 17 at 15:37
  • 2
    @KevinB It was a well-posed question, concise but complete, understandable to non-experts, and citing obvious references. Sneering aside, that's a pretty good question in my book. – MisterMiyagi Feb 17 at 15:44
  • 2
    @KevinB I would like to point out that this discussion is about whether the question should have been closed/deleted. If you find the question to not be useful (and you're certainly welcome to that opinion) then you should downvote the question. For example, I have never found a JavaScript question to be useful (because I don't write code in that language). While I'm welcome to downvote every JS question I see, I think you'd agree that this doesn't give me the right to close/delete them on that basis. – cigien Feb 17 at 15:57
  • 1
    @cigien yeah, that's not at all what I'm arguing, but thanks! – Kevin B Feb 17 at 15:59
  • 4
    I understand C++ quite well, and I endorse this answer. It appears to be one of those cases where people tried in vain to find a "general reference" close reason, couldn't find one, so applied one of the reasons that obviously doesn't apply. Not that the question is even "general reference", even if that were a valid reason to close questions on Stack Overflow. Time aside, deletion of that Q&A was contraindicated due to the high quality answer. – Cody Gray Feb 17 at 17:34

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .